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L4L hosts a Live Chat with the KmyMoney folks

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Software

Come one, come all! On 27 June, 2005 at 9:30 pm CST, Lobby4Linux is proud to sponsor a Live Chat with some of the DevTeam of KmyMoney. This personal finance application is quickly becoming the “Quicken Killer” for Linux. We at Lobby4Linux have used this application extensively and find it to be not only complete, but pretty to look at not at all difficult to use. The DevTeam of KmyMoney deserve a rousing round of applause for their hard work. Lobby4Linux is happy to host these gentlemen and give them a chance to give us a peek under the hood and behind the curtain of this wonderful application. Please take the time to register at Lobby4Linux.com so you don’t have to wait in line come Monday. We expect a large turnout and we hope to see you there. Remember, this Monday, 9:30 PM CST at Lobby4Linux.com. The chat board is powered by X7 Chat and can accomodate everyone who is interested.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Due to a technical glitch within our PHP page, the confirmation email you receive when you register will have a blank “from” line. Many email clients see this and immediately deposit it in the junk or trash folder. If you do not see a confirmation email from L4L upon registration, check these folders. We are working to get this fixed as fast as possible.

I would also like to take this time to announce a new staff member of Lobby4Linux.com. Mr Tracy Kuhlman, AKA “Okie” has assumed the duties as Linux Technical Representative. Okie’s broad knowledge of Linux and his ability to communicate on the new user level make him a valuable asset to Lobby4Linux and we are proud to call him a TeamMember. If you get a chance, email him, Okie at Lobby4Linux dottt kom and say hi. Pardon the spam-trap email address. It’s a sad state of affairs when one must butcher the language in order to make a point. Wait a minute…I do that several times a week in writing my blog. Never mind.

Please take the time and drop by Monday night for our Live Chat with the DevGuys from KmyMoney and give Okie a shout when you get time. Both of those things will be appreciated.

Alrighty-then

helios

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