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Laptop Machine

HP Pavilion dv6105us Media Center Notebook PC
US Product Number - RG253UA#ABA

  • Microprocessor - 2.0 GHz AMD Turion™ 64 Mobile Technology MK-36
  • Microprocessor Cache - 512KB L2 Cache
  • Memory - 512MB DDR2 System Memory (2 Dimm)
  • Memory Max - 2048MB
  • Video Graphics - NVIDIA GeForce Go 6150 (UMA)
  • Video Memory - with up to 128MB (shared)
  • Hard Drive - 80GB 5400RPM (SATA)
  • Multimedia Drive - Super Multi 8X DVD±R/RW with Double Layer Support
  • Display - 15.4” WXGA High-Definition BrightView Widescreen (1280 x 800) Display
  • Fax/Modem - High speed 56k modem
  • Network Card - Integrated 10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN (RJ-45 connector)
  • Wireless Connectivity - Broadcom 4311 802.11b/g WLAN
    [lspci output: Broadcom Corporation Dell Wireless 1390 WLAN Mini-PCI Card (rev 01)]
  • Sound - Altec Lansing MCP51
  • Keyboard - 101-key compatible
  • 1 Quick Launch Button - HP Quick Play Menu
  • Pointing Device - Touch Pad with On/Off button and dedicated vertical Scroll Up/Down pad
  • PC Card Slots - 1 ExpressCard/54 Slot (also supports ExpressCard/34)
  • External Ports:
    • 2 Universal Serial Bus (USB) 2.0
    • 1 Headphone out
    • 1 microphone-in
    • 1 VGA (15-pin)
    • 1 TV-Out (S-video)
    • 1 RJ-11 (modem)
    • 1 RJ -45 (LAN)
    • 1 notebook expansion port 3
    • 1 Consumer IR
  • Dimensions - 14.05" (Loser x 10.12" (W) x 1" (min H)/1.56" (max H)
  • Weight - 6.8lbs
  • Power:
    • 65W AC adapter
    • 6-cell Lithium-Ion Battery

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