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Easily Convert .WMA to .MP3 in Linux

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HowTos

If, like me, you find that the majority of applications outside of the fuzzy, feel good realm of Windows do not inherently recognize .wma file format, then this script help you out.

Open up a file named wma2mp3 in your favorite editor, copy and paste the following code, then save. Don't forget to 'chmod +x wma2mp3' when you're finished so you can execute the script.

If you're in Ubuntu, or some other familiar distribution, place the script within ~/ .gnome2/ nautilus-scripts/ to be able to use the script from within the context menu.

Full Story.

help?!?!?!

Hi,
I'm very new to Linux but have been trying very hard to catch up. there are a few basic concepts I don't get just yet. Like:

"Open up a file named wma2mp3 in your favorite editor, copy and paste the following code, then save. Don't forget to 'chmod +x wma2mp3' when you're finished so you can execute the script."

can you talk to me like I'm 8 years old so I can understand how to work in the linux environment. I guess thats not all that true, if I were 8 it would probably make since to me.

Thanks so much
Michael Manning

tried Audacity?

Probably side tracking (slightly) from the way that you want to solve this problem, have you tried Audacity?

I recommend installing this program (there should be plenty of help from your distro of choice on how to do this).

And install lame if you want to use mp3's.

Audacity is a great GUI prog and is more than suitable for my needs so should be good for this problem.

If you want to change an audio file in this prog;
start audacity,
open the file you want to change
export it as a different file type.

Not as quick as running a bash script but nice and clicky with a mouse.

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