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PCLinuxOS becomes PCUbuntuOS

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PCLOS
Interviews
Humor
-s

PCLinuxOS founder Texstar said in a private interview that they would using Ubuntu for the base of future versions of PCLinuxOS. Citing the old adage 'if you can't beat 'em, join 'em,' Texstar states that PCLinuxOS 2007 will be delayed for another six months or so while the new change is implemented.

When asked why they would make such a drastic change Texstar said, "If Ubuntu is going to take over the Linux world, then perhaps we should be on the winning team."

Texstar also said that the upcoming default interface would indeed be gnome. He added, "All indications point to a confused user when faced with too many choices and Gnome has the built-in advantage of limited user configuration and customization."

What of all your software in the PCLOS repository, I asked. Texstar answered, "Again, it seems that the new influx of Linux users just does not want too much freedom of choice. This makes things easier for the developer in that I will not need to recompile all those packages for our new PCUbuntuOS. It seems clear that most users are happy having one app chosen for them for each task and we should be able to fit most onto a standard cdrom sized iso. We see no further need of an online repository of thousands of extra applications compiled especially for our distro anymore."

Texstar explains their position on sudo by saying, "Sudo is a very important element of the Ubuntu experience. It offers numerous capabilities while advocating very little concern over restrictive security issues. Sudo makes sure anyone can execute any command desired without having administration privileges. It removes all the unnecessary permission confusion for the new Linux user."

Not quite all the developers on the PCLOS team will be staying on during and after the conversion. Sal is quoted as saying, "This is bullsh*t! If I wanted to work on Ubuntu, I would have joined their development team long ago and got paid for it." OClient is quoted as saying, "I'm taking the sources to the current PCLOS and forking it to my own distro. I'll be calling it PCRealLinuxOS."

When asked how he felt about the dissention in the ranks, Tex said, "Well, it was to be expected. Humans naturally resist change, however good for them it may be. Most of us are excited about the change and all the extra free time it will give us."

In closing, Texstar stated to look for a test of PCUbuntuOS to be posted sometime in the near future.

Dude..

...you almost had me there.

Thanks for the heads up

April Fools' day was yesterday in these parts. I was completely taken in and was about to head off to the forum to let off some steam. sudo indeed.

Oh, the relief. Happy Dance

Way to go, Susan!

MEPIS and GpcGLos!

Haha

If this was true I would've been crying my head of now. lol

PCUbuntuOS

I don't think Ocilent1 would have been that polite... he would have been far from Oh Silent One!

PCUbuntuOS

I gotta hand it to Texstar. This has to take the Linux insider South Park-type April Fools joke contest hands-down. It has a very smooth but biting level of irony to it.

At the same time, PCLinuxOS feels to me to be fast becoming the sole "uncompromised" Linux distro that offers all the things it does. Without huge, corporate sponsorship. Without Microsoft sponsorship. Without Michael Robertson's sponsorship. And without Ubuntu's repositories! (gimme a yay!)

I mean face it; what do we have left that really works for an uncompromised desktop distro? Not very darn much.

Thanks, Texstar.

regards,
-dc

re: PCUbuntuOS

oppps. I guess I should state that Texstar didn't actually have anything to do with this. He didn't say any of the stuff in this article. He would never publically insult anyone or anything. In fact, he might be a bit put out with me for doing this. Texstar is innocent, it was all from my evil mind. }:)

Evil mind

Oh, you are awful. But we do like you.

Haha!

"Again, it seems that the new influx of Linux users just does not want too much freedom of choice. This makes things easier for the developer in that I will not need to recompile all those packages for our new PCUbuntuOS."

I loved that. Good stuff Susan.

re: Haha!

re: Haha!

Wow! I bet you didn't expect that kind of reaction!

re: Haha!

No, I didn't. I would have spent a bit more time on it had I known. Big Grin Strange how the ubuntu forum didn't realize it was a joke too.

TuxMachines Renamed FaxMachines

'Nuff said!

It's true! And preparations

It's true! And preparations for the GNOME DE are well underway and progressing nicely over at MyPCLinuxOS dot com. And on that note, I think Devnet is also changing the project site's name to MyPCUbuntuOS.com.

I'm installing Slackware.

Registered Linux User No. 401868

Make that "MyPubuntuOS.com"

Quote:

And on that note, I think Devnet is also changing the project site's name to MyPCUbuntuOS.com.

A source familiar with the project, who requested anonymity because they're not authorized to speak to the press, reports that the new name for the popular web site will be MyPubuntuOS.com, pronounced "my peuw-buntu OS". "We wanted to make the name as memorable as possible," said the source, who added, "Go ahead. Pull my finger."

That was GREAT!

Just caught up with this thread, it had me ROTFL! Only thing you missed would have been my "expletives deleted" comments on gnome. Smile
Love ya girl.
Sal

I'm sure glad I read the comments...

before I yelled pull, and let both barrels go on my stack of PCLinuxOS releases.

Good Joke

Rich D.

Preserve for posterity

The article and responses on the forums should be preserved. I hope one day I will be able to look at my archive of the Ubuntu thread and say "I'm glad that distro didn't last".

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