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Peacock Linux

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Linux

Today, we are pleased to be able to reveal a new operating system: Peacock GNU/Linux. Of course, who better to tell you about it than its creator, Drew Peacock:

"Peacock Linux - the Galactic Operating System - aims to make the best of both worlds. It's the perfect amalgam between free and proprietary."

At the moment, Peacock Linux is still largely in the planning stages, but Drew has made very clear how Peacock Linux aims to impress:

"Most Linux distributions only include free and open source components, but they're missing out on a lot of fun! Some include non-free components, but they just don't go far enough - we need to look at the Windows world, and take some of the best bits. All the best software is written for Windows, so its about time we stopped being left out and used Wine to its full impact."

More Here.

More in Tux Machines

Games: ASCII, Carrion and Slippi

  • The 20 Best ASCII Games on Linux System in 2020

    If you are looking for the ASCII games on Linux, then you are in the right place. Who doesn’t love to play games? In this modern era, you have access to the various graphics-intensive games right into your mobile phone. If you own a latest-generation console or a monster gaming PC, then you are ahead of the time. You can play abundant games of different categories that almost look like real movies. [...] Linux is not a gaming platform. The gamers always lean towards a PlayStation, Xbox, or a Windows machine. But the ASCII games library on Linux is huge. Although, these are not like those AAA titles that everyone wants to play. Rather, these games will bring you back to childhood. [...] Well, trying to play modern games on Linux is not always possible. This is because of the lack of support. Besides, most of the Linux geeks use their Linux distros for their work purpose. Hence, if you want to try some games just for driving the boredom away, these can be some great options. ASCII games on Linux don’t require that much CPU, GPU, or RAM to run. Instead, they are of just a few kilobytes of size. Moreover, some of the games mentioned above will remind you of your childhood. Lastly, if you think that we missed your favorite ASCII game to include in this list, just let us know in the comment section. Happy gaming!

  • Carrion Launches July 23 for PC, Linux, Mac, Switch, and Xbox One

    Devolver Digital have confirmed the release date for Carrion, during the D3: Devolver Digital Direct pre-recorded press conference. This “reverse horror game” has you become a The Thing style monster- reaching out and munching on the personnel of the facility keeping you captive. Eat, grow, and evolve to gain new abilities, to bring more terror to your prey.

  • Play Smash Bros. Melee Online With Slippi

    For a game that’s nearly 20 years old, Super Smash Bros. Melee for the GameCube has still been a staple in the fighting game community. To this day some prefer Melee‘s more sophisticated mechanics over the other games in the Smash Bros. series; namely, L-canceling, wavedashing, being able to hog the ledge to prevent other recovering players from grabbing it, and other more complex additions. Brawl was too slow for some and introduced new mechanics that threw many veterans off. And even though Ultimate picked up the pace in terms of speed, the overall design of the game is to appeal to casual gamers; gamers who are new to the fighting genre. Fan-made mods like Project M and Project Plus have given players the itch that they wanted for Melee‘s mechanics, but as far as I know there’s no easy way to play online with other players.

today's howtos

Kernel: Rust, Language, and Linux Plumbers Conference

  • Linus Torvalds' Initial Comment On Rust Code Prospects Within The Linux Kernel

    Kernel developers appear to be eager to debate the merits of potentially allowing Rust code within the Linux kernel. Linus Torvalds himself has made some initial remarks on the topic ahead of the Linux Plumbers 2020 conference where the matter will be discussed at length. In the mailing list thread when discussing Greg Kroah-Hartman's past comments on the Rust prospects for the kernel, it was mentioned that one of the conditions being sought is that it would effectively be disabled by default until there has been sufficient testing.

  • Linux 5.8 Formally Adds The Inclusive Terminology Guidelines

    Merged overnight into the Linux kernel source tree are the new guidelines concerning the use of "inclusive terminology" for future code. It was just one week ago that the inclusive terminology guidelines for the Linux kernel were first proposed to mixed reaction and have now been merged into the source tree after receiving enough approval of various upstream kernel maintainers. [...] There are around 19.5k mentions of "slave" within the kernel source tree, mostly within the kernel networking code. The string "master" is mentioned some 26.9k times. For "blacklist" are around 888 mentions when checking in the current Git tree. Linux is currently at around 69.3k text files with around 3.54 million lines of code comments and 20.1 million lines of code (along with 3.6 million blank lines).

  • Linux team approves new terminology, bans terms like 'blacklist' and 'slave'

    Linus Torvalds approved on Friday a new and more inclusive terminology for the Linux kernel code and documentation. Going forward, Linux developers have been asked to use new terms for the master/slave and blacklist/whitelist terminologies.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Systems Boot and Security Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Systems Boot and Security Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference! Computer-system security is an important topic to many. Maintaining data security and system integrity is crucial for businesses and individuals. Computer security is paramount even at system boot up, as firmware attacks can compromise the system before the operating system starts. In order to keep the integrity of the system intact, both the firmware as well as the rest of the system must be vigilant in monitoring and preventing malware intrusion. As a result of last year’s microconference Oracle sent out patches to support Trenchboot in the Linux kernel and in GRUB2. An agreement was also reached on problems with TPM 2.0 Linux sysfs interface.

  • GNU Tools Track Added to Linux Plumbers Conference 2020

    We are pleased to announce that we have added an additional track to LPC 2020: the GNU Tools track. The track will run for the 5 days of the conference.

Programming: GNOME/GTK, GNU C Library, Perl and Python

  • Implementing Gtk based Container-Widget: Part — 2

    This write-up is in continuation of its previous part — setting up basic container functionality. In the past couple of weeks, we moved on from just adding children to actually repositioning them (child widgets of the container, NewWidget) when enough space is not available for all widget to fit in the given width. Though the grid structure is yet to put in place, the widget could be seen taking shape already (look at below gif).

  • This week in GNOME Builder #2

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  • Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS CPUs Now Supported By GNU C Library

    The Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS is designed for high performance embedded environments with the 32-bit HS5x and 64-bit HS6x series. Synopsys has long offered their own GNU toolchain builds to support the DesignWare ARC hardware on Linux while now the mainline support is in good shape with glibc for the ARCv2 ISA having been mainlined. Though do note it's ARCv2 and not the latest ARCv3 ISA.

  • A FIXIT-dive into an old CPAN module

    Let’s have a thought experiment. Assume there is an Open Source-licensed Perl module published on CPAN that you care about, and that hasn’t had any updates in a very long time - what are your options? In this blog post, I’ll take a dive into this problem, and use the Geo::Postcodes::NO module as an example. As of this writing, the module version is 0.31, and it’s most recent release was in September 2006. [...] Contribution information for the module is missing (or at least, less than expected). The author ARNE has offered his email address, and after a quick search one can find his Github page. He hasn’t published this module there, though. If we are going to contribute with this, then just adding a CONTRIBUTING.md file is a probably a good place to start. If the module you are looking for has the same problem, then check out it’s “How to contribute” page on MetaCPAN (you can find a link to it in the menu there). There’s another issue though – we can’t offer a pull-request! At best we can send a patch(1) file attached to an email. While this is a bit old-school and should still work (assuming the author accepts those), there might be better options available.

  • Chapter 3 - Google Correlate example update

    In Chapter 3 on Page 87, the book refers to the Google Correlate service. However, as of December 2019, the service has been shutdown. Since the chapter requires you to download a CSV formatted data, it is no longer possible. However, you can instead download a version of the data that I had used 5 years back when writing the book from here.

  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 004 - Class Attributes and Inheritance

    Learnt about Class Attributes and Inheritance, today.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxv) stackoverflow python report