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Games: Assassin’s Greed, Yorg, Wanted Raccoon and More

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Gaming
  • Assassin’s Greed

    I don’t think any sane person is going to disagree with the quote, “Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely.”

    For those unaware, that quote came from British politician Baron Acton in 1887. That’s one of the few sayings man has uttered that stands against the test of time. Keep in mind, Acton coined this phrase from politicians who said something similar even earlier than his time; Acton’s phrase just seems to be the most popular, since it reads like modern English.

    Now, I’m not trying to get into politics; we’re a gaming web site, after all. But sadly, after a number of events have occurred — for the gaming industry in particular — within the past couple of years, I feel like even us Linux gamers get the short end of the stick. True, we always had the short end of the stick, up until Valve stepped in and basically saved our bacon around 2012-2013. But as far as native Linux games are concerned, and as advanced as Proton gets, competition that has arisen lately can either be a plus for us, or, as I bring out here, competition can be more so of a nuisance than it is anything else.

    [...]

    Yeah, some were probably expecting me to point the gun at Microsoft first. I’m not a total Microsoft hater, as I do appreciate some of their work, like some of the code they’ve contributed to the Linux kernel. But I seem to hear it all the time. Microsoft bought this company.

    [...]

    Microsoft joined the Linux foundation late 2016. Supposedly, they’re a high-paying “Platinum Member.” I don’t know if their claim, “We love Linux,” is actually true. If anything, they consider Linux as a threat, as long as they’re not making revenue via this platform. They haven’t made any official drivers for Linux as far as their Xbox controllers are concerned. Microsoft is invested in Linux at least when it comes to their whole Azure cloud services, a competitor to AWS and Google Cloud, and they have made it easier to develop for Linux within Windows with the WSL module developed in partnership with Ubuntu.

    Microsoft tried to make their own locked garden during the Windows 8 era with the Windows Store and trying to force everyone to put their applications through there. Fortunately, they failed miserably, thanks in no small part to Valve creating SteamOS. But it doesn’t mean Microsoft won’t stop trying.

  • FOSS racer Yorg has a new release with improved gamepad support | GamingOnLinux

    Top-down open-source racing? Yorg is a little bit like some of the classic Micro Machines games and while rough around the edges as it's in development it's showing promise as another FOSS game.

    With fast arcade racing along with some amusing physics, Yorg is already a lot of fun with multiple tracks, vehicles and different drivers to pick from. You can play against AI, local multiplayer and experimental online multiplayer. There's weapons too, so you can blow everyone up.

  • Wanted Raccoon is an upcoming comedy game in the spirit of Goat Simulator

    Remember the craziness of Goat Simulator? Wanted Raccoon has a familiar theme of animals going wild and it's entering Early Access on March 19 with Linux support.

    A game that seems like a big gimmick but apparently there's a little more to it. The developer mentions an actual storyline and some sort of research system. You can ride skateboards, fight people, upgrade skills, and of course - steal food. Everything a good Raccoon does right? There's also something about a kidnapped family. Hero Raccoon to the rescue?

  • Building a Retro Linux Gaming Computer - Part 2: Selecting a Graphics Card

    Linux graphics support is still remarkably similar to how it was 20 years ago, even with all the progress that has been made in the years since. The Mesa 3D graphics library had its origins all the way back in 1995, and through the Utah GLX project attracted the attention of industry luminaries such as id Software’s John Carmack and vendors such as ATI, Intel, Matrox, S3, and 3dfx. By the turn of the millennium all of them had at least some support in Mesa.

    Nvidia went a different route, one which continues to set them apart to this day. Rather than choosing to cooperate with Mesa they instead ported their Windows drivers over to Linux directly, maintaining their own proprietary binary blob separate from the main Linux kernel. This driver model was also later adopted by ATI when they switched focus to their own proprietary “fglrx” driver, although this was largely reversed again after AMD acquired the company in 2006.

    By the time of Red Hat Linux 9 the Direct Rendering Infrastructure or DRI was firmly in place in Mesa and offered 3D support for a wide number of cards. This included the ATI 3D Rage Pro Turbo, which was the AGP card I had selected to test the machine. While a solid 2D performer it offered lacklustre 3D graphics even for the time of its release, and was intended more as an OEM graphics solution than for gaming. That makes them easy to find, but also not worth a lot.

More in Tux Machines

Make Linux look like Windows - 2021 edition

Here we go again. Roughly three years ago, I showed you how to skin your Linux installation to look more like Windows, should your particular taste lean in that direction. It was an interesting little experiment. Also nerdy to the core. But apart from possible nostalgia and tech glamor, there might also be practical reasons for why someone would want to make their distro look more like a Microsoft product. And the answer is: entice non-techie people who expect the familiar. Say you install a distro for folks with zero Linux knowledge and some rudimentary Windows familiarity. Normally, this is a recipe for disaster. I call this The Grandma Gentoo Test (TGGT), AKA how likely is the ordinary person to master the subtleties of computer usage without your nerdy help? But this is true for all operating systems, except Windows had been around for a long time, and it's the primary desktop interface that most people somewhat know how to somewhat use. So then, can you make your chosen distro behave like Windows, and nonce the wiser? Read more

Security Patches and GNU/Linux Security

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (nettle, squid, and thunderbird), Debian (libebml, python-bleach, and python2.7), Fedora (batik, gnuchess, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, ruby, singularity, and xorg-x11-server), Mageia (clamav, kernel, kernel-linus, and python3), openSUSE (chromium, fluidsynth, opensc, python-bleach, and wpa_supplicant), Oracle (gnutls and nettle), Red Hat (dpdk, gnutls and nettle, mariadb:10.3 and mariadb-devel:10.3, and redhat-ds:11), and SUSE (kernel, qemu, and xen).

  • Openwall Releases LKRG 0.9.0 with a Long List of Major Changes, Improvements & Bug Fixes

    Openwall recently announced the release of LKRG (Linux Kernel Runtime Guard) 0.9.0, featuring a host of major changes and improvements, as well as fixes for multiple security bugs. LKRG is a kernel module that performs runtime integrity checking of the Linux kernel and detection of security vulnerability exploits against the kernel.

  • Can Linux Be Used To Offer More Security In A WFH World (On And Offline)?

    Operational security at least seemed so much easier back when traditional 9-to-5 office life was still dominant. Talk of professionals taking their work home with them was largely metaphorical, with only occasional instances of C-suite types dragging their laptops everywhere they went. Business hardware and systems would be shielded through physical security and isolated networks. One office (or office complex), one place to guard: entirely straightforward. Now, after a year that’s seen countless businesses (some eagerly and others reluctantly) adopt the working-from-home model, there are different challenges to overcome. Teams are scattered and must share sensitive data across the internet — data to which other companies and fraudsters would love to gain access. When information gets out, reputations are destroyed and businesses (particularly those working entirely online) struggle to survive.

Audiocasts and Videocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack, Ubuntu Budgie 21.04, and openSUSE 15.3

  • LHS Episode #408: Let’s Get Metaphysical

    Hello and welcome to the 408th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short topics episode, the hosts discuss the new, upcoming YOTA contest, Pop! OS, the new amateur radio census, codec2, Linux Mint, the Universal Ham Radio Remote and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week!

  • Ubuntu Budgie 21.04 overview | Simplicity and Elegance in one package.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Ubuntu Budgie 21.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • openSUSE 15.3 First Impressions & Preview

    openSUSE 15.3 is the next version of Leap, due to be released this year. I decided to take a look at the upcoming distro in its current state, to not only refresh myself on openSUSE itself, but to also see what the developers are up to nowadays.

Android Leftovers