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FreeBSD 13.0-RC1 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The first RC build of the 13.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 13.0-RC1 amd64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC1 i386 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC1 powerpc GENERIC
o 13.0-RC1 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 13.0-RC1 powerpc64le GENERIC64LE
o 13.0-RC1 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 13.0-RC1 armv6 RPI-B
o 13.0-RC1 armv7 GENERICSD
o 13.0-RC1 aarch64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC1 aarch64 RPI
o 13.0-RC1 aarch64 PINE64
o 13.0-RC1 aarch64 PINE64-LTS
o 13.0-RC1 aarch64 PINEBOOK
o 13.0-RC1 aarch64 ROCK64
o 13.0-RC1 aarch64 ROCKPRO64
o 13.0-RC1 riscv64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC1 riscv64 GENERICSD

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/13.0/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/13.0" branch.

A summary of changes since 13.0-BETA4 includes:

o An update to handle partial data resending on ktls/sendfile has been
  added.

o A bug fix in iflib.

o A fix to pf(4) for incorrect fragment handling.

o A TCP performance improvement when using TCP_NOOPT has been added.

o Several SCTP fixes and improvements.

o Several other miscellaneous fixes and improvements.

A list of changes since 12.2-RELEASE is available in the releng/13.0
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/13.0R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 13.0-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/13.0-RC1/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

BASIC-CI images can be found at:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/CI-IMAGES/13.0-RC1/

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-024a37d8ee55504a9
  eu-north-1 region: ami-0f7e6ef964131a5c5
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0da383cf93cddac9d
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0c2e5eecf725c8480
  eu-west-2 region: ami-07e739abd39787f83
  eu-south-1 region: ami-042c036041ab5c683
  eu-west-1 region: ami-02b72374c39f164f4
  ap-northeast-3 region: ami-06b158bab2dc009b8
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0fbcb7db014004a7f
  me-south-1 region: ami-0a5040da848631036
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0ea2e5573427aa49c
  sa-east-1 region: ami-0e8ca0e56ecd00395
  ca-central-1 region: ami-08503cd732e74743f
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0fa7c7d12cd5c992f
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0adc820ff9c36b582
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0f031e3027fe5ed45
  eu-central-1 region: ami-0685d9bbc37652517
  us-east-1 region: ami-0dc102bfa2a63a6c0
  us-east-2 region: ami-0d65407784cf103ac
  us-west-1 region: ami-0d676e4b02aeac56e
  us-west-2 region: ami-0f2f2e90ae8956750

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-00bc7809c32164ef7
  eu-north-1 region: ami-079c3b3939e1422f5
  ap-south-1 region: ami-09f83dd115907186c
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0b466ac2ccb1d9a17
  eu-west-2 region: ami-03127626a3b795617
  eu-south-1 region: ami-04b543c7eca712cb2
  eu-west-1 region: ami-04bec8381d23b2d33
  ap-northeast-3 region: ami-08ec822521c26b950
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-08b8dd381dcc36d65
  me-south-1 region: ami-07253323150004fb7
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0979ee58e90456542
  sa-east-1 region: ami-06effcb873d7718ef
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0c5838a8f4369ddb8
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0ee5d390ccfa85ec5
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0bda890b388931e8e
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-069ccae98ade21bc2
  eu-central-1 region: ami-0c06b28ffd66f0a3c
  us-east-1 region: ami-04f0d8aef11064219
  us-east-2 region: ami-022f3e436ebcf74f2
  us-west-1 region: ami-037a2837218ac2a61
  us-west-2 region: ami-0f0a390fdd1ca6fba

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-13.0-RC1
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 13.0-RC1

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

Now in Phoronix as well

  • FreeBSD 13.0-RC1 Released With TCP Performance Improvement, Other Fixes

    With plans of formally releasing FreeBSD 13.0 at month's end, FreeBSD 13.0-RC1 is available this weekend and on-schedule for helping to test and evaluate this forthcoming major BSD operating system update.

    Over the prior betas, FreeBSD 13.0-RC1 has a TCP performance improvement when using TCP_NOOPT, SCTP fixes and improvements, and a variety of other low-level fixes and improvements. But at this stage most of the additions are mundane.

Microsoft Tim pushing against the GPL (which Microsoft hates)

  • License to thrill: Ahead of v13.0, the FreeBSD team talks about Linux and the completed toolchain project that changes everything

    It's not as well known as Linux, but FreeBSD has plenty of hardcore fans. In a wide-ranging chat covering licensing, architectures including RISC-V, and a development model that's free of a "dictator", The Reg spoke to members of the project about new release features and more.

    FreeBSD 13.0 has just reached release candidate 1 and is scheduled to come out at the end of March – with key new features including a complete LLVM toolchain, faster networking, and improved ZFS file system.

    Major new releases come every two years or so: 12.0 was pushed out in December 2018, and 12.2 in October 2020. We spoke to kernel developer John Baldwin and Ed Maste, who is a FreeBSD committer and director of Project Development for the FreeBSD Foundation.

This is wrong. FreeBSD 13.0 is out out. Only RC2 today.

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