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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Siemens, IBM, Red Hat Launch Hybrid Cloud Initiative to Increase Real-time Value of Industrial IoT Data

    Siemens, IBM and Red Hat today announced a new collaboration that will use a hybrid cloud designed to deliver an open, flexible and more secure solution for manufacturers and plant operators to drive real-time value from operational data. In one month, a single manufacturing site can generate more than 2,200 terabytes of data according to a report by IBM – yet most data goes unanalyzed.

    Through the joint initiative, Siemens Digital Industries Software will apply IBM’s open hybrid cloud approach, built on Red Hat OpenShift, to extend the deployment flexibility of MindSphere®, the industrial IoT as a service solution from Siemens. This will enable customers to run MindSphere on-premise, unlocking speed and agility in factory and plant operations, as well as through the cloud for seamless product support, updates and enterprise connectivity.

  • IT leaders see open source as higher quality

    While enterprises believe open source software provides benefits including higher quality software and innovations, they also perceive barriers to adoption including levels of support and compatibility, according to a Red Hat report assessing enterprise open source usage.

    Curiously, security shows up as both a positive and negative in the report, with open source seen as offering better security but the security of the code seen as a barrier. Released on March 2, the 2021 State of Enterprise Open Source report covers data collected from interviews with 1,250 IT leaders worldwide, who were not necessarily Red Hat customers, Red Hat said.

  • Operators over easy: an introduction to Kubernetes Operators

    You've probably been hearing a lot about Kubernetes Operators, but if you don't work directly with Red Hat OpenShift or another Kubernetes distribution you may not know precisely what an Operator is. In this post, we'll explain what Operators are and why they're important.

    To better understand the "what" and the "how" about Kubernetes Operators, we need to understand the problem(s) that motivated the need for Kubernetes Operators.

    Kubernetes is notorious in its ability to integrate and facilitate declarative configuration and automation. This was out-of-the-box manageable for most stateless applications. However, for stateful applications this was a bit problematic. How do you manage and persist the state of your application and it’s dependencies? How do you keep the rest of your application going when you add or remove dependencies? Of course, much of this management was done manually and/or required additional personnel resources to help manage (i.e., DevOps) and, in general, required more of your attention.

    Much of these pains, boiled down to one ultimate question at hand: How do you effectively automate stateful applications on Kubernetes?

    That answer came in the form of what we call Kubernetes Operators.

  • Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2021-09

    Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)! The Beta freeze is underway. The Fedora Linux 34 Beta Go/No-Go meeting is Thursday.

    I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

  • Colin Walters: Why I work on OpenShift and Fedora/RHEL

    Every weekday for many years now I’ve woken up, dropped my kids off at school, then grabbed a coffee and sat down at my computer to work on OpenShift and Fedora+RHEL.

    Doing this for so long, over time I’ve thought about and refined the why I do this, and I want to write it down so that I can refer to this in various places. Some of this is a more condensed/rephrased variant of this blog post.

    I was inspired to be here originally (over 20 years ago) by the Free Software movement – one thing in particular I remember is seeing the Emacs start screen linking to the FSF website on our school’s Solaris workstations (In app advertisement worked!). Along with that, one thing I always found fascinating about software in general is the feeling of "the power of creation" – I can type something and make it happen.

    Since then, software has become much, much more foundational to our society (in some cases, probably too much re: social media, etc). In particular here the rise of software-as-a-service and the public clouds. And while we say "public" which has connotations of "openness" – these are all very proprietary clouds.

Openwashing as the Doom of "Open Source" as a Label

  • Ever wondered why the big beasts in software all suddenly slapped an 'I heart open-source' badge on?

    A shift within the enterprise to open source is gathering pace due less to total cost of ownership and more to innovations around infrastructure and container technologies, according to a new report.

    The survey, based on interviews with 1,250 IT leaders (unaware that it was Red Hat sponsoring the activity) found 64 per cent of respondents citing "infrastructure modernisation" as the top use for enterprise open source (up from 53 per cent two years ago) with application development and the nebulous "digital transformation" coming second and third respectively.

    Almost half of respondents had container technologies (such as Kubernetes) in production and another 37 per cent were using containers for development.

    It all seems a little fast-moving for the traditionally lethargic world of enterprise technology.

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  • What is Raspberry Pi 4 “Model B”? [Ed: I'm still waiting for them to formally apologise for going behind customers' backs, making secret deals with Microsoft to put Microsoft malware on all those devices]

    Raspberry Pi has conquered the world of SoC (System on a Chip). It has already garnered millions of followers since its release in 2012. Not only is it inexpensive, but it’s also versatile, modular, and multi-purpose. It has become popular not only as a credit-sized computer board but also as a controller in electronic, robotics, and IoT projects. The size, features, and price drive the popularity of the Pi, especially in the DIY community. To keep up with the current technological trends, the tiny board has undergone plenty of upgrades over the years, and there have been many varieties so it can cater to the needs and demands of its users. In 2019, the Raspberry Pi Foundation released the fourth generation of the multi-purpose board, the Raspberry Pi 4 B. It is the most powerful Pi to date, sporting huge upgrades from its predecessors. The compact board is touted to deliver a PC-level performance, and it didn’t disappoint.

  • Kentaro Hayashi: Grow your ideas for Debian Project

    There may be some "If it could be ..." ideas for Debian Project. If idea is concreate and worth to make things forward, it should make a proposal for Project Funding. [...] I'm not confident whether mechanism works, but Debian needs change.

  • Sam Thursfield: Calliope, slowly building steam

    There are some interesting complexities to this, and in 12 hours of hacking I didn’t solve them all. Firstly, Bandcamp artist and album names are not normalized. Some artist names have spurious “The”, some album names have “(EP)” or “(single)” appended, so they don’t match your tags. These details are of interest only to librarians, but how can software tell the difference? The simplest approach is use Musicbrainz, specifically cpe musicbrainz resolve-ids. By comparing ids where possible we get mostly good results. There are many albums not on Musicbrainz, though, which for now turn up as false positives. Resolving Musicbrainz IDs is a tricky process, too — how do we distinguish Multi-Love (album) from Multi-Love (single) if we only have an album name? If you want to try it out, great! It’s still aimed at hackers — you’ll have to install from source with Meson and probably fix some bugs along the way. Please share the fixes!

  • Neovide Is A Graphical Neovim Client Written In Rust

    Neovide is a really cool GUI client for Neovim. Although it essentially functions like Neovim in the terminal, Neovide does add some nice graphical improvements such as cursor animations and smooth scrolling. It even has me thinking about making it my new "vim" alias.

Linux 5.11.13, 5.10.29, 5.4.111, 4.19.186, 4.14.230, 4.9.266, and 4.4.266

Get involved with Mageia, become a Packager

With Mageia 8 just released and development for Mageia 9 getting underway in Cauldron, the unstable branch of Mageia, now is a great time to get involved with packaging. We are starting to look at the features that we want to include for Mageia 9, and as it is so early in the development cycle, now is the time for major developments, or big updates to key pieces of software. This is a great time to join the project as you can propose features you would like to see, help to implement large changes or see how a distribution evolves through development, stabilisation and then is released. If there is an application that you are interested in, if you want to help maintain part of the distribution, or if you want to learn something new, there are many opportunities to do so with the packaging team. Read more

Google does not want you to tell your players about your donation page

I recently updated Pixel Wheels banner image on Google Play. That triggered a review of the game: shortly after the update I received a message telling me Pixel Wheels was "not compliant with Google Play Policies". What nefarious activity does the game engage in? Sneak on users? Mine bitcoins? [...] Meanwhile you can still get the game from F-Droid or itch.io, since they do not have a problem with a link to a donation page. Read more