Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Portrait: GNOME Foundation's Dave Neary

Filed under
Interviews

Many free software advocates make a name for themselves by being involved with a single project. Dave Neary casts a wider net. He is a GNOME Foundation member, community manager of the OpenWengo project, and a former contributor to the GIMP project.

Neary, the oldest of five kids, describes himself as "farm-boy redneck at heart" who caught the computer bug at an early age. "I had my first experience with computers in school -- a row of Apple IIes that had a BASIC interpreter built in. I had a teacher who loved computers and used to enjoy teaching us to peek and poke.... I got a Sinclair ZX Spectrum 128K +2 at home with a cruddy monochrome monitor when I was around 13. I mostly played games on it, but I also messed about with BASIC on there too; as I got older I got a kick out of rendering Mandelbrot and Julia sets."

Neary says his introduction to free software came later, while he was working on a postgraduate research project at Dublin City University in Dublin, Ireland.

"The project I was working on wouldn't compile or run properly under Windows (something about the paging in the memory model) so I was doing must of my work remotely through xterms on the department's Sun workstations. Emmet Caulfield convinced me that I'd be better off with my own personal Linux workstation, so I finally gave in and bought Linux for Dummies, which included an install CD for Red Hat 5.0.... A month later, I was up and running with my new shiny FVWM 95 desktop."

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) to Ship with OpenStack Liberty

Canonical's James Page posted an interesting message on the Ubuntu mailing list, informing all Ubuntu developers about the steps they need to take in order to update the OpenStack cloud software to version 2015.2.0 (Liberty) in Ubuntu 15.10. Read more

Mark Shuttleworth Details Ubuntu 15.10 Highlights [VIDEO]

Ubuntu developers are closing in on the next major release, with the Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf set to debut on October 22. Ubuntu 15.10 is in many respects an incremental release ahead of the 16.04 Long Term Support release in 2016. Among the key innovations in 15.10 is wider use of the Snappy technology for packaging, though it won't replace the core .deb packaging system anytime soon, if ever. Read more

Improving Security for Bugzilla

Openness, transparency, and security are all central to the Mozilla mission. That’s why we publish security bugs once they’re no longer dangerous, and it’s why we’re writing a blog post about unauthorized access to our infrastructure. We have notified the relevant law enforcement authorities about this incident, and may take additional steps based on the results of any further investigations. Read more

RHEL 7.2 has an updated kernel target

As mentioned in the beta release notes, the kernel in RHEL 7.2 contains a rebased LIO kernel target, to the equivalent of the Linux 4.0.stable series. This is a big update. LIO has improved greatly since 3.10. It has added support for SCSI features that enable VMWare VAAI support, as well as data integrity (DIF), and significant iSER work, for those of you using Infiniband. (SRP is also supported, as well as iSCSI and FCoE, of course.) Read more