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Why India Needs To Fuss Over FOSS

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OSS

Did you know that over 85% of India’s Internet runs on FOSS, or Free an Open Source Software that strikes at the heart of software patents?

If your answer is ‘No’, you may be pleasantly surprised to know that India now ranks 3rd in the world in terms of FOSS usage, according to GitHub. In fact, some of India’s largest government projects, many technology startups, and some of India’s largest software services companies extensively us FOSS, according to a recently-released report titled ‘The State of FOSS in India’ by CivicData Lab.

FOSS communities in India, according to the report supported by Omidyar Network India, have also organized themselves to solve India’s challenges like digital inclusion by creating Indian language fonts, dictionaries and other essential tools that are widely used across the country.

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Android Leftovers

Stable Kernels: 4.4.267, 4.9.267, 4.14.231, 4.19.188, 5.4.113, 5.10.31 and 5.11.15

I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.267 kernel.

All users of the 4.4 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.4.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 4.9.267 Linux 4.14.231 Linux 4.19.188 Linux 5.4.113 Linux 5.10.31 Linux 5.11.15