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Raspberry Pi Leftovers

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GNU
Linux
  • StereoPi v2 stereoscopic camera is powered by Raspberry Pi CM4 (Crowdfunding)

    StereoPi stereoscopic camera based on Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 was introduced in late 2019 on Crowd Supply. The camera can record 3D video, create 3D depth maps with OpenCV, and benefits from the Raspberry Pi software ecosystem.

  • What is the Difference Between Raspberry Pi 3 and 4?

    Raspberry Pi may sound like an appetizing raspberry-flavored dessert, but it’s far from being edible. It’s a credit card-sized, Broadcom-based, single-board computer, that’s easy on the pocket.
    Hailing from the United Kingdom, the first generation of Raspberry Pi was released in 2012 with the intention of teaching students about computers. Due to its size, cost, and modularity, it has been utilized for other purposes, such as in IoT (Internet of Things), robotics, electronics projects, and is now being promoted for industrial use as well.

    The unbelievably tiny computer has spanned four generations so far. There are normally two versions for each generation, models A and B, but revisions and enhancements come along the way, upgrading the models to A+ or B+. Although inedible, these Raspberries have delightful features. Two of the most in-demand models are from the third and fourth generations of the Raspberry Pi. Expectedly, Raspberry 4 is a better model, but it costs more than its predecessors. Is it a worthy upgrade from Raspberry Pi 3? Read on as we dig deeper into the gratifying features of its two recent versions.

  • What is the Raspberry Pi Zero used for?

    Raspberry Pi was built to educate students about computers and teach them about programming. The Linux-based kit is complete with all the basic components of a desktop computer board despite its credit card size. Just put the tiny board in a case, load the OS in a microSD card, and connect all the necessary peripherals, and you can already boot up a computer! Surprisingly, it became popular among DIY enthusiasts and project builders too. Raspberry Pi boards are already small, but would you believe that the Raspberry Pi Foundation managed to make an even smaller board?

Universal design for learning in computing

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