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Today in Techrights

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Security Leftovers

  • How the NAME:WRECK Bugs Impact Consumers, Businesses [Ed: Now they go ALL CAPS to increase the SHOCK FACTOR]

    How this class of vulnerabilities will impact millions connected devices and potentially wreck the day of IT security professionals.

  • Linux Foundation sigstore finds ‘origins’ in software supply chains [Ed: Companies connected to the Pentagon trying to centralise "trust" and over time control what people can and cannot install and run on their own GNU/Linux systems]

    The Linux Foundation announced the sigstore project this spring. Designed to improves the security of the software supply chain, sigstore is said to enable the adoption of cryptographic software signing backed by transparency log technologies. Software application development professionals will be able to securely sign software artifacts such as release files, container images and binaries. Signing materials are then stored in a tamper-proof public log. The service will be free to use for all developers and software providers, with the sigstore code and operation tooling developed by the sigstore community.

  • NSA uncovers new "critical" flaws in Microsoft Exchange Server [Ed: It sort of misses the point that there are NSA back doors in everything from Microsoft]

    Microsoft released three new patches for its Exchange Server software on Tuesday after the National Security Agency (NSA) alerted the company to a fresh batch of critical vulnerabilities. The new fixes are for three versions of Exchange Server - 2013, 2016 and 2019 - and the flaws are said to be different vulnerabilities to the ones disclosed in March. However, US agencies continue to find and remove vulnerabilities in their systems a month after the previous flaws were first discovered.

  • Not even the best antivirus could have shielded you from this Linux and macOS malware [Ed: Misinformation. It neglects to say that Microsoft delivers this malware. Instead it blames the recipients of Microsoft (NPM)]

    Researchers have identified a new strain of Linux and macOS malware capable of eluding even the most reputable antivirus services. According to security company Sonatype, the malicious program was discovered on the npm registry, a developer resource that catalogues various open source JavaScript packages.

Top 6 Web Server Performance Testing Tools

Web server benchmarking is a way of determining the performance of a web server with the aim of establishing how well it copes under a sufficiently high workload. Performance testing is important to help maintain continuous system performance. The performance of a web server can be expressed in a number of different ways including the number of requests served within a certain time, the latency response time for each new connection or request, or the throughput. The open source Linux benchmarking tools featured in this article enable the performance of a web server to be tested prior to releasing it in a production environment. Accurately testing a web server is quite a challenging activity. This is, in part, because a web system is a distributed system. Further, Hypertext Transfer Protocol, the application protocol for hypermedia information systems, can cause connection usage patterns that the Transmission Control Protocol was not designed for. Moreover, problems are generated in testing the performance because of the sheer dynamism of a web server. Read more

reTerminal – A Raspberry Pi CM4 based 5-inch HMI Terminal

Seeed Studio has just unveiled reTerminal HMI terminal that reminds me of the company’s Wio Terminal based on Microchip SAMD51 Arm Cortex-M4F microcontroller with a 2.4-inch display. But as we’ll look into the details, reTerminal is quite a different beast as a Linux-capable device powered by a Raspberry Pi CM4 module with up to 8GB RAM, equipped with a 5-inch capacitive touchscreen display, and supporting plenty of connectivity options from GIgabit Ethernet to WiFi to LoRaWAN. Read more

today's howtos

  • LFCA: Learn Binary and Decimal Numbers in Network – Part 10

    In Part 9 of the LFCA series, we covered the basics of IP addressing. To better understand IP addressing, we need to pay more attention to these two types of IP address representation – binary and decimal-dotted quad notation. As mentioned earlier, an IP address is a 32-bit binary number that is usually represented in decimal format for ease of readability. The binary format uses only the digits 1 and 0. This is the format that your computer comprehends and through which data is sent across the network. However, to make the address human-readable. It is conveyed in a dotted-decimal format which the computer later converts into binary format. As we stated earlier, an IP address is made up of 4 octets. Let’s dissect the IP address 192.168.1.5.

  • 6 advanced tcpdump formatting options

    The final article in this three-part tcpdump series covers six more tcpdump packet capturing trick options.

  • 5 Funny Commands to use in Linux and Terminal

    Not everything in Linux is serious, fortunately we can find fun programs created for the sole purpose of entertaining us. You may be wondering why? Well, because we are human and at the end of the day we need a little variety, laughter and maybe a drink on the train. And yes, speaking of the train, let’s introduce you to the first fun command-type application in Linux.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Should you ever reinstall your Linux box? If so, how?

    Broadly speaking, the Linux community can be divided into two camps – those who upgrade their operating systems in-vivo, whenever there is an option to do so in their distro of choice, and those who install from scratch. As it happens, the former group also tends to rarely reinstall their system when problems occur, while the latter more gladly jump at the opportunity to wipe the slate clean and start fresh. So if asked, who should you listen to? The question of system management in Linux is a complex one, with as wide a range of answers as there are distributions. In this blog post, we discuss the concept of reinstall, and whether it’s necessary. Then, we address several other closely related ideas like system imaging, full disk encryption, and data backups. [...] System problems are an unfortunate side effect of software usage. With some luck and operational discipline, you can avoid most of them. When they do happen, you want to know what to do. Reinstalling your Linux system is always an option, but it’s usually not necessary, even for various difficult, complex problems. Even if you do decide to reinstall, you should consider using a live session to inspect the system or perform any last-minute backups, have a solid backup procedure in place regardless, and weigh the benefits of encryption against your day-to-day needs and risks. System images can also help you reduce the hassle of getting back to speed when you do decide to “reset” your distro. That’s all we have on Linux reinstallations. If you have any comments or suggestions, please join our forum, and let us know your thoughts.