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Review: DragonFlyBSD 1.8.1

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BSD

I have been neglecting the BSD line of operating systems lately, but a new release of DragonFlyBSD has come out and I figured this would be a good opportunity to try it out. I have never used DragonFly, but I used to use FreeBSD extensively (I still have it running a few servers) and I’ve also used OpenBSD and NetBSD in the day.

What is DragonFlyBSD?

DragonFlyBSD is a project led by Matthew Dillon and branched from FreeBSD in 2003. The reason for the fork was due to differing ideas about how the OS should handle multiple processor systems.

I downloaded the dfly-1.8.1_REL.iso.gz file from the link off DistroWatch and decided to try it in a QEMU virtual machine on my desktop. I was going to try it on an old Dell Optiplex at work, but didn’t get a chance to. So QEMU it was.

I setup QEMU with 1GB of RAM and 2 CPUs and booted it up.

The boot loader came up, and I chose the default.

Full Story.

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