Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Australia outlaws using Internet to incite suicide

Filed under
Web

People who use the Internet to incite others to commit suicide or teach them how to kill themselves face fines of up to A$550,000 ($430,000) under tough new laws passed in Australia on Friday.

Using the Internet to counsel or incite others to commit suicide or to promote and provide instruction on ways to do it has been outlawed but the new laws were not designed to stifle debate about euthanasia, Justice Minister Chris Ellison said.

"These offences are designed to protect the young and the vulnerable, those at greatest risk of suicide, from people who use the Internet with destructive intent to counsel or incite others to kill themselves," Ellison said in a statement. Individuals convicted of such offences face a fine of up to A$110,000, while corporations face a fine of up to A$550,000.

Use of the Internet to organize suicide pacts emerged as a grim problem for Japan last year, with dozens of Japanese killing themselves in Internet-linked group suicides.

Helping someone to commit suicide is illegal in Australia but there has been a long-simmering debate about euthanasia.

Dr Philip Nitschke shot to fame in 1997 when he helped four people die in the Northern Territory, where the practice was briefly legal before the national government stepped in to overturn local laws.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

GNOME: Maps shaping up for 3.20

So, we're soon approaching the UI freeze for GNOME 3.20. It's looking quite good when it comes to OpenStreetMap editing in Maps (among other things). But first I thought I was going to show-case another improvement, namely the expanded place bubbles (show information about places you search for on the map). Read more

The Influence of Debian in Linux Open Source Community

The Linux community, and the technology world in general, were shocked by the news of Ian’s Murdock tragic death a couple of weeks ago – and rightfully so. Ian’s legacy and vision as the founder of the Debian project not only influenced many others who went on to start their own distributions, but also were the means to create a rock-solid operating system that many individuals and businesses of all sizes have used for more than 20 years. Read more EOL:

  • Debian 6 LTS reaches end-of-life on February 29 - it's time to upgrade
    The Debian Long Term Support team has announced that Debian 6 - a long term support release - will stop receiving updates on February 29, 2016. Debian 6 was first released on February 6, 2011, and saw ten point releases while it was supported by the main nucleus of the Debian community. Since July 19, 2014, maintenance of Debian 6 has been left to the Long Term Support team.
  • Debian GNU/Linux 6.0 LTS "Squeeze" to Reach End-of-Life on February 29, 2016
    Today, February 12, 2016, the Debian Project has announced that the long-term supported Debian GNU/Linux 6.0 (Squeeze) is about to reach end-of-life (EOL) in approximately two weeks, on February 29, 2016.

Fysbis: The Linux Backdoor Used by Russian Hackers

Fysbis (or Linux.BackDoor.Fysbis) is a new malware family that targets Linux machines, on which it sets up a backdoor that allows the malware's author to spy on victims and carry out further attacks. Read more

Faking Open, Debian Influence, Da Linux

Matt Asay today said that there is no money in Open Source software because the "open source companies" that get rich don't do it with Open Source software. The big story today must be the Russian government's plan to dump Windows for Linux. Debian 6.0 will reach its end-of-life at the end of the month and Tecmint.com recently looked at the influence Debian has had on the Linux community. A new website helps you decide what you can do for Fedora and I Love Free Software day approacheth. New openSUSE Board member Bryan Lunduke sees some problems in KDE Neonland and Swapnil Bhartiya shared his picks for best distros of 2016. Read more