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today's howtos

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  • Visualizing system performance with RHEL 8 using Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) and Grafana (Part 2)

    In this post, I’d like to show you how to use Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) with Grafana and Redis to store and graph performance data for all the machines in your environment. We’ll do this in a simple two machine setup, but the concepts are the same as you add more machines.

  • Calibre 5.0 for Linux

    For those who like to read, Calibre is a wonderful program for managing e-books. Calibre will not only allowed to maintain and organize your library of e-books but also perform format conversions.

    Calibre can also let you read your e-books on your system without needing an e-reader. Of course, you can always read an e-book on a smartphone.

  • Firecracker: start a VM in less than a second

    Initially when I read about Firecracker being released, I thought it was just a tool for cloud providers to use – I knew that AWS Fargate and https://fly.io used it, but I didn’t think that it was something that I could directly use myself.

    But it turns out that Firecracker is relatively straightforward to use (or at least as straightforward as anything else that’s for running VMs), the documentation and examples are pretty clear, you definitely don’t need to be a cloud provider to use it, and as advertised, it starts VMs really fast!

    So I wanted to write about using Firecracker from a more DIY “I just want to run some VMs” perspective.

    I’ll start out by talking about what I’m using it for, and then I’ll explain a few things I learned about it along the way.

  • 3 email mistakes and how to avoid them

    In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 17 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021.

    OK, so we've talked about some things we should do with our email - Stop treating it as an instant messenger, Prioritize things, trying to reach Inbox Zero, and filtering it effectively. But what things SHOULDN'T we do?

  • 6 Steps to Teach Yourself System Administration

    Looking for ways to get started in system administration? In this Skills article, we’ll provide an overview of resources that will help you on your way. If you’re unfamiliar with the basics of what a system administrator does, we recommend starting with this introduction.

    There is no traditional path for acquiring the technical skills needed as a system administrator, according to Enable Sysadmin. “Some sysadmins have an associate or college degree, and some don’t. Depending on when a sysadmin began their career, he or she might have a variety of technical certificates ... or none at all.” Here, we provide an array of options with which to plot your own course of study.

  • How to install KaOS 2021.01
  • How to Install Krita 4.4.2 via Another PPA in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10

    For those prefer installing apps via apt method, the digital painting software Krita 4.4.2 now is available to install via another well trusted PPA for Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 20.10, Linux Mint 20.

    Krita 4.4.2 was released a week ago as the latest version of the free open-source painting software, with new features: SVG mesh Gradients, mesh transform, new gradient fill layer type, new brushes, and improved HiDPI support.

  • How to set up static IP address on Debian Linux 10/11 - nixCraft

    I have Debian 10 Linux cloud server, and it is configured to get IP addresses via DHCP. How do I convert DHCP address to static IP address settings?

  • How To Enable Hardware Accelerated Video Decode In Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi And Opera Browsers On Debian, Ubuntu Or Linux Mint

    Google Chrome 88 (and newer) has made hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux, but it's not enabled by default. Google Chrome is not the only Chromium-based web browser to support hardware acceleration on Linux though. This article explains how to enable hardware-accelerated video decoding in Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi and Opera web browsers running on Debian, Ubuntu, Pop!_OS or Linux Mint (Xorg only).

    Using hardware-accelerated video decode in your web browser should result in using less CPU usage (and thus, less battery draining) when playing online videos.

    It's worth noting that Chromium web browser had patches that allowed making hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux for some time, and some Linux distributions packaged it using those patches. So Chromium users have had hardware acceleration on Linux for some time, depending on their Linux distribution or if they installed the patched Chromium in some other way. E.g. on Ubuntu / Linux Mint there's a PPA with VA-API patched Chromium builds. Thus, these instructions may also work for Chromium browser, depending on how it's built.

  • How to Manipulate Images in the Linux Terminal

    Ever tire of constantly opening up your favorite image editor for a simple crop, resize, or to change the file format? Maybe you have a need to easily perform these tasks in batch or within software?

    Here's how to use the Linux convert tool, which allows you to do all this with terminal via the command line, and much more.

More From Derrik Diener

  • Debian: install Deb file [Guide]

    If you’ve used Debian Linux for any amount of time, you’ll have heard of “Deb” files. What are they? Deb files are packages for Debian Linux that contain software. They’re similar to EXEs on Windows.

  • Linux: download file from URL in terminal [Guide]

    Want to download files to your Linux PC from the command-line but don’t know how to do it? We can help! Follow along as we go over ways you can use the Linux terminal to download files!

  • Linux: list all users [Guide]

    On Linux, there are many different tools for creating new users. Each Linux desktop environment has a user manager, and these user managers, while very handy, come up short. None of them support viewing hidden system users such as root, dbus, etc.

    If you’ve been trying to get a complete list of all users on your Linux PC but don’t know where to start, this guide is for you. Follow along as we show you how to list all users on your Linux system, including ones that don’t appear in your Desktop Environment’s user manager.

More from askmetutorials

  • [Older] Install Firefox 84 on Ubuntu / Linux Mint / CentOS & Fedora

    In this tutorial, I will show you how to install Firefox 84 on Ubuntu 20.04 / 18.04 LTS, LinuxMint 20, Fedora 32, and CentOS 7.X / 8.X.

    Firefox most commonly used browsers by everyone and one of the standard browsers too.

  • [Older] Install HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) 3.20.11 in Ubuntu / Debian

    In this tutorial, I will show you how to install the latest version of HPLIP 3.20.11 On Ubuntu 20.10 and Debian 10.6.

    HPLIP stands for HP Linux Imaging and Printing, which is developed by HP for using HP Laserjet and HP Inkjet Printers Printer in Linux Platforms.

    HPLIP supports more than 2000 Printer models including all business models, inkjet, laser and etc.., you can also check the list of supported devices here.

  • [Older] Install Blender 2.91 On Ubuntu / Linux Mint Via PPA

    Blender is a free and open-source application for 3D Computer graphics software products used mainly for creating animated films, visual effects, art,3D Printing Models, Video games, and many more.

    Blender contains the following features sculpting,3D Modeling, animation, camera tracking, Rendering, Video editing, compositing, and many more and it supports multiple operating systems (ie) Windows, Linux, and MacOSX.

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More in Tux Machines

Rocket League Still Thriving on Steam While Delisted

As you can see from the above chart, the Rocket League community on Steam has never been as active as now, even though the game is officially delisted. The game is alive and well and continues to be receive frequent updates on Steam – and the increase of the player base through EGS has potentially made the game more enticing than ever to play online, regardless of the platform. Wile you cannot purchase Rocket League directly on Steam anymore, it can still be obtained through third party resellers. Such third party key are selling at crazy prices, sometimes above 100 USD. [...] Also, this is a reminder that Rocket League still works fine on Linux even after the termination of the native port and the big Epic client update in September 2020… Read more

Small Image Tools that Pack a Real Punch

The spotlight usually focuses on the heavyweight Linux graphics tools such as GIMP, Shotwell, digiKam, Inkscape, and Krita. However, there are many other open source graphics tools that merit attention. Linux offers a vast collection of open source small utilities that perform functions ranging from the obvious to the bizarre. It is the quality and selection of these tools that help Linux stand out as a productive environment. A good utility cooperates with other applications, integrating seamlessly. Although command-line tools are very useful for updating, configuring, and repairing a system, their benefits are not only confined to system administration. The majority of the applications featured in this article are command-line tools. They are very light on system resources, fast and efficient, don’t rely on a windowing system, and are great for integrating with other applications and scripting. The term lightweight is a label attached to computer software which is relatively simpler or faster than its counterparts. Feature bloat is endemic in software especially commercial software. Often, the easiest way to persuade users to upgrade to the latest version is to add new spangly features. This happens with open source software (to a lesser degree), and open source graphics software is not immune to feature bloat. Well, there is no feature bloat here! To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of small image tools that are incredibly useful. Read more

Debian: Rejections, LTS Work, and Bugfixes

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in February 2021

    FTP master This month I accepted 162 and rejected 28 packages, which is again a small increase compared to last month. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 291. Debian LTS This was my eightieth month that I did some work for the Debian LTS initiative, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian.

  • RCBW 21.9 – jwiltshire.org.uk

    A recent upload of electrum suffers from the serious bug #981374. On the face of it this is just a missing package dependency: can you help with testing and preparing an updated package to fix this? You don’t need to be a Debian Developer to get stuck into this one!

Videos and Shows: KDE Community Edition PinePhone and This Week in Linux

  • KDE Community Edition PinePhone Unboxing and First Try! - YouTube

    In this video I'm "unboxing" (or, rather, showing the box and its contents) of the pinephone, and trying it for my first time!

  • This Week in Linux 141: GRUB 2 Security Flaw, Linux Mint to Force Updates?, Valve’s Steam Link

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’re going to try something different with the show. Let me know what you think of the changes. This episode is completely stacked with exciting news, we’ve got a ton of Distro News from Ubuntu, openSUSE, Linux Mint, SystemRescue, IPFire, and even Linux From Scratch. A vulnerability was found in GRUB 2 that lets someone bypass Secure Boot so we’ll talk about that and just how bad is it? The EU announced some great news related to Right to Repair. Valve has announced that Steam Link is now available on Linux and it’s a real game changer. We’ve also got some media production news to check out this week from Blender, Ardour and a new synthesizer called Vital. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!