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No, really! Ubuntu is not Linux! Try it on for size!

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Ubuntu

Or: "The Futility of trying to fit square Windows users into round Linux holes."

Even the best of us blow it sometime, and some of us idiot bloggers blow it every day.

My last post will have a place next anniversary as this year's "What Was I Thinking" award.

Let's start over, shall we? Here's my logic for this idea:

Linux started out 15 years ago as a free version of Unix. With me so far? OK.

Currently, the system with the biggest user share is Microsoft Windows. A lot of people want to leave it. This is a GOOD thing! A lot of people just want something that works without needing a Master's Degree in computer science. I AM PERFECTLY HAPPY WITH THAT! It is a *GOOD* thing that they are able to seek their own freedom, however they define it. I haven't messed up yet, have I?

Now, there's this project called "ReactOS", which is being built as a free replacement for Windows. For reason/reasons unknown, ex-Windows users leaving Windows and seeking a free alternative somehow do not seem to be flocking to ReactOS.

More Here.

re: nutcase

Someones been snorting that powdered herring again.

I've had a beef with this

I've had a beef with this guy since this guy bashed me for using the word elitist in one of my blog posts and told me the following:

""Elitist" is a hate word. Same category as "nigger", "kike", and "fag"."

In this article: penguinpetes.com/index.php?title=no_longer_linking_to_yet_another_linux

I wonder what set him off so much in this instance. He totally missed everything I said in the article he references...but I guess he had his heart set on looking inept and pissing and moaning. He's excellent at throwing fits and making up meanings of words but interpreting intentions and imbued meaning he is not.

Notice the link in his blog links are "the REAL Yet Another Linux Blog". Nice quip at yours truly. Of course, people know he's full of crap on this...but he does have a small following of fanatics that love to see him stroke his ego (no pun intended) on his poorly designed blog. But hey, it's XHTML compliant so woot! Confused flipping retarded.

Insert_Ending_Here

re: beef

Like gnats, the world is full of morons.

More efficient to just ignore them all then try to swat a few.

What a waste of time

This blog post's just dumb. Ubuntu is, without a doubt, aimed at people who don't want to futz with the guts of the operating system, or even a command line; they just want to Get Things Done(tm). More power to them. But guess what, Penguin Pete? Even with its odd "sudo" usage and its simplified GUI, beneath the hood, Ubuntu's all Linux. (And sooner or later, most Ubuntu users will start experimenting with the bash prompt.)

Guess what else, Penguin Pete (if that is your real name)? There are quite a few Windows users out there who are better at using Windows to get their work done than you are at using Linux.

The reason more people aren't contributing to ReactOS is that nobody wants a freaking Windows clone. The real one's bad enough (or good enough, depending on your point of view) already.

The post beneath this one, "Linux Hates Me," is even dumber.

I wonder if we could know where the story link goes from the front page? Maybe give the name of the blog?

re: waste of time

eco2geek wrote:

I wonder if we could know where the story link goes from the front page? Maybe give the name of the blog?

I'm gonna try, but I can tell that's gonna get to be a drag pretty quick. It messes up my finely-tuned copy & paste routine I've gotten down. Big Grin

Thank you, Susan

I owe you one for adding those sources!

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