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Linux 5.11-rc5

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Linux

So this rc looked fairly calm and small, all the way up until today.

In fact, over 40% of the non-merge commits came in today, as people
unloaded their work for the week on me. The end result is a slightly
larger than usual rc5 (but both 5.10 and 5.8 were bigger, so not some
kind of odd outlier).

Nothing particularly stands out. We had a couple of splice()
regressions that came in during the previous release as part of the
"get rid of set_fs()" development, but they were for odd cases that
most people would never notice. I think it's just that 5.10 is now
getting more widely deployed so people see the fallout from that
rather fundamental change in the last release.  And the only reason I
even reacted to those is just because I ended up being involved with
some of the tty patches during the early calm period of the past week.
There's a few more still pending.

But the bulk of it all is all the usual miscellaneous fixes all over
the place, and a lot of it is truly trivial one- or few-liners. Just
under half the patch is for drivers, with the rest being the usual mix
of tooling, arch updates, filesystem and core (mm, scheduling,
networking).

Nothing here makes me go "Uhhuh" in other words.

            Linus

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Also: Linux 5.11-rc5 Kernel Released Following A Busy Sunday - Phoronix

Kernel prepatch 5.11-rc5

  • Kernel prepatch 5.11-rc5

    The 5.11-rc5 kernel prepatch is out for testing. "Nothing particularly stands out. We had a couple of splice() regressions that came in during the previous release as part of the 'get rid of set_fs()' development, but they were for odd cases that most people would never notice. I think it's just that 5.10 is now getting more widely deployed so people see the fallout from that rather fundamental change in the last release."

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