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Debian: Vendoring, FOSSHOST and Freexian’s Debian LTS

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Debian
  • Bug#971515: marked as done (kubernetes: excessive vendoring (private libraries))
    This means that you claim that the problem has been dealt with.
    If this is not the case it is now your responsibility to reopen the
    Bug report if necessary, and/or fix the problem forthwith.
    
    (NB: If you are a system administrator and have no idea what this
    message is talking about, this may indicate a serious mail system
    misconfiguration somewhere. Please contact owner@bugs.debian.org
    immediately.)
    
    
  • The Debian tech committee allows Kubernetes vendoring

    Back in October, LWN looked at a conversation within the Debian project regarding whether it was permissible to ship Kubernetes bundled with some 200 dependencies. The Debian technical committee has finally come to a conclusion on this matter: this bundling is acceptable and the maintainer will not be required to make changes

  • Kentaro Hayashi: fabre.debian.net is sponsored by FOSSHOST

    Today, we are pleased to announce that fabre.debian.net has migrated to FOSSHOST

    FOSSHOST provides us a VPS instance which is located at OSU Open Source Lab. It improves a lack of enough server resources then service availability especially.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2020

    A Debian LTS logo Like each month, have a look at the work funded by Freexian’s Debian LTS offering.

    Debian project funding

    In December, we put aside 2100 EUR to fund Debian projects. The first project proposal (a tracker.debian.org improvement for the security team) was received and quickly approved by the paid contributors, then we opened a request for bids and the bid winner was announced today (it was easy, we had only one candidate). Hopefully this first project will be completed until our next report.

    We’re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article.

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