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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • Essential Guide: How to Install Docker on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Beginners Guide)

    Docker is a combo of ‘platform as a service’ products and services which use OS virtualisation to provide software in packages called containers.

    Containers contain everything an app, tool or service needs to run, including all libraries, dependencies, and configuration files. Containers are also isolated from each other (and the underlying host system), but can communicate through pre-defined channels.

  • Demux, mux and cut MP4 in ffmpeg

    Sometimes video and audio needs to be separated into individual files (aka demuxed). This can be handy when some audio artifacts need to be removed (e.g. noise or buzz) from the audio track (aka stream). This can be done easily...

  • Oracle Linux 8: Containers made easy with short training videos

    Container technology provides a means for developers and system administrators to build and package applications together with libraries, binaries, and configuration files so they can run independently from the host operating system and kernel version. You can run the same container application, unchanged, on laptops, data center virtual machines, and on a cloud environment.

  • Fix for 2createpackages in woofQ

    WoofQ is the build system for EasyOS. It has scripts '0setup', '1download', '2createpackages' and '3buildeasydistro', that are run in that order. The script '2createpackages' splits each input package into _EXE, _DEV, _DOC and _NLS components.

    Recently, when compiling LibreOffice in EasyOS on the Pi4, the configure step reported that the system boost libraries cannot be used, as some header files were missing. So, I had to use the internal boost, which does make the final LibreOffice PET bigger than it could have been.

  • How to Install and Remove Packages in Arch Linux

    Want to install packages on Arch Linux but do not know how? A lot of people face this problem when they first migrate from Debian-based distributions to Arch. However, you can easily manage packages on your Arch-based system using package managers.

    Pacman is the default package manager that comes pre-installed in every Arch distribution. But still, there's a need for other package managers as Pacman doesn't support packages from the Arch User Repository.

  • How to Manage Systemd Services with Systemctl on Linux

    Systemd a standard process for managing start-up services in Linux operating systems. It is used for controlling which programs run when the Linux system boots up. It is a system manager and has become the new standard for Linux operating systems. Systemd allows you to create a custom systemd service to run and manage any process. In this tutorial, we will explain how to manage services with systemd on Linux.

  • How to install Synfig Studio on Linux Mint 20.1 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Synfig Studio on Linux Mint 20.1.

  • How to install Ubuntu Unity Remix 20.10 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Ubuntu Unity Remix 20.10.

  • How to Exclude a Directory While Finding Files in Linux

    In Linux, the find command is used to search for files or folders from the command line. It is a complex command and has a large number of options, arguments, and modes.

    The most common use of the find command is to search for files using either a regular expression or the complete filename(s) to be searched.

  • How to Copy Files with Specific File Extension Recursively

    In Linux, the command ‘cp‘, which standards for ‘Copy‘ is used to copy files and folders to another folder. It is available by default in Linux as part of the GNU Coreutils set of tools.

    The most basic use of the cp command is to specify the files to be copied as the arguments and to specify the target folder as the last argument.

  • How to Copy Large Number of Files in Linux

    We use the cp command in Linux to copy files and directories from one directory to another. It can be simply used to copy a few files or directories, or it can be used with the '-r' argument (which stands for ‘recursive‘) to copy a directory and the whole directory tree structure underneath it.

  • What is /dev/null in Linux

    The ‘/dev‘ directory in Linux and Unix based systems contains files corresponding to devices attached to the system. For example, as seen in the screenshot below, the CD drive is accessed using ‘cdrom‘, DVD drive with ‘dvd‘, hard drives are accessed using ‘sda1‘, ‘sda2‘, etc.

    All these files communicate with the Linux system through the respective files in ‘/dev‘. The input/output processing of the devices takes place through these files. This is due to an important feature of the filesystem in Linux: everything is either a file or a directory.

  • What is ‘> /dev/null 2>&1’ in Linux

    /dev/null is a pseudo-device file in Linux, which is used to discard output coming from programs, especially the ones executed on the command line. This file behaves like a sink, i.e. a target file which can be written, however as soon as any stream of data is written to this file, it is immediately deleted.

    This is useful to get rid of the output that is not required by the user. Programs and processes can generate output logs of huge length, and it gets messy at times to analyze the log.

  • Learn the main Linux OS components

    Evolved from Unix, Linux provides users with a low-cost, secure way to manage their data center infrastructure. Due to its open source architecture, Linux can be tricky to learn and requires command-line interface knowledge as well as the expectation of inconsistent documentation.

    In short, Linux is an OS. But Linux has some features and licensing options that set it apart from Microsoft and Apple OSes. To understand what Linux can do, it helps to understand the different Linux OS components and associated lingo.

  • How to Redirect Output to /dev/null in Linux

    In Linux, programs are very commonly accessed using the command line and the output, as such, is displayed on the terminal screen. The output consists of two parts: STDOUT (Standard Output), which contains information logs and success messages, and STDERR (Standard Error), which contains error messages.

    Many times, the output contains a lot of information that is not relevant, and which unnecessarily utilizes system resources. In the case of complex automation scripts especially, where there are a lot of programs being run one after the other, the displayed log is huge.

  • How to Move Large Number of Files in Linux

    To move files from one directory to another, the ‘mv‘ command is used in Linux. This command is available in Linux by default and can be used to move files as well as directories.

  • How to Limit the Depth of Recursive File Listing in Linux

    In this article, you will learn how to list file directory structure and limit the depth of recursive file display in Linux.

  • How to Find Top Running Processes by Memory Usage

    We will use the top command-line tool, which is a task manager in Unix and Linux systems that shows all the details about running processes with memory usage.

  • How to Extract Email Addresses from Text File in Linux

    In this article, you will learn how to extract Email addresses from a text file in Linux, using the handy command-line tool Grep.

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openSUSE Leap 15.3 Reaches Beta Build Phase

openSUSE Leap has entered into the beta release phase today for its 15.3 minor version. This openSUSE Leap 15.3 version is a solidified release that focuses more on the building of the distribution rather than refreshing the distribution?s packages, but there are some significant changes to the distribution. Many of the packages will remain the same as those in openSUSE Leap 15.2 with a bit of hardware enablement and security backports. An updated version of glibc brings some Power10 support and the Xfce desktop users will have the new 4.16 version. The distribution also gains adds s390x architecture. The biggest change for this release is how Leap is built and its relationship with SUSE Linux Enterprise. Leap transitioned to a new way of building openSUSE Leap releases in the fall of 2020 through a prototype project called Jump. The Jump prototype was used as a proof of concept, but no longer exists; it did prove to work at building a distribution and bringing the code streams of both openSUSE Leap and SLE closer together. The proof of concept was implemented for building the release of openSUSE Leap 15.3 as seen in the beta release today. Building Leap on top of binary packages from SLE, which was part of the rationale for the Jump prototype, allows for easy development on a community release to be put into production on an enterprise release should the need arise. Read more Also: openSUSE Leap 15.3 Beta Begins - Phoronix

Microsoft Security Issues and Blame-Shifting

Android Leftovers

It’s raining i.MX 8M Plus systems-on-module at Embedded World 2021

NXP introduced i.MX 8M Plus AI SoC with a built-in 2.3 TOPS neural processing unit (NPU) last year, and we’ve already covered several early announcements about i.MX 8M Plus systems-on-module (SoM) with Variscite VAR-SOM-MX8M-PLUS and DART-MX8M-PLUS, TechNexion EDM-G-IMX8M-PLUS and AXON-E-IMX8M-PLUS respectively using SO-DIMM edge connectors and board-to-board connectors, as well as SolidRun i.MX 8M Plus SoM that was announced together with the HummindBoard Mate carrier board with dual Gigabit Ethernet. But as Embedded World 2021 Digital is taking place virtually until Friday, other companies have now made their own announcements of i.MX 8M Plus SoMs as the processor enters mass production this month, and since as far as I know, it’s pin-to-pin and software compatible with earlier i.MX 8M Nano/Mini SoCs, the update must have been easy. That means we’ve got a longish list of modules, and I have probably missed some. Supported operating systems are basically the same across companies with Linux using Builroot or the Yocto Project running on Cortex-A53 cores, and FreeRTOS on the real-time Cortex-M7 core. Some also offer Android support. Read more