Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Security fix installed after breach

Filed under
Security

The operations center for a credit card processing firm whose security was breached by a hacker, exposing 40 million accounts to possible fraud, has put new security software in place.

Marc Maiffret, a computer security specialist and co-founder of eEye Digital Security of Aliso Viejo, Calif., said his firm installed the security upgrade for Atlanta-based CardSystems Solutions' operations center here on June 10.

On Friday, MasterCard International Inc. disclosed that 40 million credit card accounts belonging to it and other companies were exposed to possible fraud by a security breach at CardSystems Solutions' operations center here, the latest in a string of recent breaches at financial institutions.

Maiffret told the Arizona Daily Star that the upgrade his firm sold CardSystems Solutions was in place three days later. CardSystems may have initiated other measures as well in response to the breach, he added.

Calls to Maiffret and spokesmen for eEye Digital and CardSystems Solutions were not returned immediately Thursday.

CardSystems Solutions is among a large number of companies processing financial transactions for credit card issuers that largely use custom-made software applications not initially designed with security components as their foremost need, Maiffret said.

In addition, such third-party companies frequently must contend with budget constraints causing them to be stingy on computer security, Maiffret said.

Those settings make for favorable conditions for a skilled hacker to manipulate his way through a computer program seeking vulnerabilities, he added.

"There is really no standard for how all this financial information gets pushed around, and all these companies push it around a little differently," Maiffret told the Star.

"That means you also have all these little quirks and opportunities for a hacker who has the time to find weaknesses."

Associated Press

More in Tux Machines

An open source, e-commerce friendly CMS

Developers Peter Ivanov, Alex Raikov, and I came up with the idea for Microweber about five years ago, when we were all having problems building sites with the existing solutions. Microweber aims to take the complexity out of building a website, online shop, or blog, through a combination of drag-and-drop UI and real-time, WYSIWYG site edits. From the beginning, it's been an open source project. The earliest versions were licensed under GPL, but we switched to Apache License version 2.0 to allow the developers to protect their work and have commercial merits. Read more

Change a Ton of Unity Features in Ubuntu 15.04 with Unsettings

Unsettings is a graphical configuration program that can be used to change a large number of Unity settings. A new update has been released and now Ubuntu 15.04 is also supported. Read more

What is open source? Licensing, history, and more

Another example of open source: You wouldn’t buy a car with the hood welded shut, so why do we buy proprietary software? If you can’t see what’s going on and see what’s happening under the hood then you’re stuck with the car exactly the way it is and that might not be so great. While some people are fine with that, computer geeks shouldn’t be. We should want to get in there and tinker with it. Read more

Weekend in Techrights

Threats to FOSS Patents Links