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Wine 6.0 Officially Released with Vulkan Backend for WineD3D, This Is What’s New

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Software

A year in the making, Wine 6.0 is here to provide GNU/Linux users with much-improved support for running Windows applications and gams on their beloved distributions. Major changes including support for core modules in the PE format, Vulkan backend for WineD3D, DirectShow and Media Foundation support, as well as revamped text console.

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More coverage and the original about Wine 6.0

  • Wine 6.0 Released With A Plethora Of Improvements For Windows Software On Linux

    Wine 6.0 stable is now officially available as the annual stable release for this open-source project allowing Windows games and applications to run on Linux, macOS, and other Unix-like platforms.

    Among the many highlights for Wine 6.0 are core modules now being implemented in Portable Executable (PE) format, the initial (experimental) Vulkan back-end for WineD3D as an alternative to OpenGL, DirectShow and Media Foundation support, and a redesign of their text console implementation.

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 6.0
    is now available.
    
    This release represents a year of development effort and over 8,300
    individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements that
    are listed in the release notes below. The areas of major changes are:
    
      - Core modules in PE format.
      - Vulkan backend for WineD3D.
      - DirectShow and Media Foundation support.
      - Text console redesign.
    
    This release is dedicated to the memory of Ken Thomases, who passed
    away just before Christmas at the age of 51. Ken was an incredibly
    brilliant developer, and the mastermind behind the macOS support in
    Wine. We all miss his skills, his patience, and his dark sense of
    humor.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/6.0/wine-6.0.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/6.0/wine-6.0.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
    

Grab a Glass, Wine 6.0 Has Been Released

  • Grab a Glass, Wine 6.0 Has Been Released

    Wine 6.0 bottles up an entire year’s worth of development (fermented from more than 8,300 changes) to bring users a rich and varied palette of improvements, new features, and advanced capabilities with it.

    For those unfamiliar with it, Wine is a Windows compatibility layer that allows apps, tools, and games built for Microsoft Windows to run (with caveats) on Linux, BSD, Android, and even macOS systems.

    At the time of writing than 27,500 Windows apps and games are compatible with Wine, including well-known software like Photoshop and Microsoft Office, and popular games like StarCraft, Final Fantasy XI Online , and Team Fortress II.

Wine 6.0 released

  • Wine 6.0 released

    Version 6.0 of the Wine Windows not-an-emulator has been released.

Run Windows apps on Linux with Wine 6.0

  • Run Windows apps on Linux with Wine 6.0

    It used to be, people would scoff at the idea of switching to a Linux-based operating system due to a lack of software. While that is still true for some folks -- especially business users -- it is less of a concern these days. Why? Well, so many things are done through the web browser nowadays, lessening dependence on Windows software. For many consumers, just having the Google Chrome browser on, say, Ubuntu, is more than enough to accomplish their wants and needs. Not to mention, there are many quality Linux apps like GIMP and DaVinci Resolve.

    But OK, lets say you really want to use a Linux-based operating system, but there's some Windows-only software that you absolutely cannot live without. Thankfully, you may still be able to ditch Windows and upgrade to something like Fedora or Linux Mint. How? Thanks to the excellent Wine. This compatibility layer (don't you dare call it an emulator), can sometimes enable you to run Windows software on Linux. Today, version 6.0 is released.

Wine 6.0 Released, Download Your Copy Now

  • Wine 6.0 Released, Download Your Copy Now

    Finally, A new stable version, Wine 6.0 is available for the download. Wine is a software that helps you to run many Windows based apps on Linux based operating systems.

Wine 6.0 is out with better Direct3D support

  • Wine 6.0 is out with better Direct3D support and other improvements

    The team behind Wine, a compatibility layer to run Windows applications and games on systems such as Linux or Mac OS, has released Wine 6.0 to the public. Downloads, a compatibility database, and other information is available on the official project website.

    Wine 6.0 is available as source code and as binaries. Major changes in Wine 6.0 include DirectShow and Media Foundation support, improved handling of certain game copy protections, and support for an experimental Vulkan renderer for WineD3D.

More on Wine 6

Wine 6.0 Released, How to Install it in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10

"If you are a Linux user, you should be familiar with Wine."

  • Cheers! Wine 6.0 Released with Improved Support for Windows Games and Software on Linux

    If you are a Linux user, you should be familiar with Wine. It’s a Windows compatibility layer that allows executables for Microsoft Windows to execute on Linux, BSD, Android and, macOS.

    Wine translates Windows system calls into POSIX-compliant system calls, recreates the Windows directory structure, provides alternative implementations of Windows system libraries, system services and various other components.

    At the moment of writing 27,690 Windows games and applications including Final Fantasy XI Online, Adobe Photoshop, StarCraft, and Team Fortress 2 are compatible with Wine.

Wine pops cork on version 6.0 of the Windows compatibility layer

  • Wine pops cork on version 6.0 of the Windows compatibility layer for *nix systems

    The compatibility layer for Windows applications, Wine, has celebrated the start of 2021 in the traditional manner – with a substantial update.

    After spending December and the early part of January going through six release candidates, the stable Wine 6.0 has been rolled out, replete with over 8,300 individual changes and a year of effort from the team.

    While the developers were keen to draw attention to the major changes, namely core modules (including the likes of NTDLL and KERNEL32) now being in Portable Executable (PE) format, DirectShow support and Vulkan backend for WineD3D, a considerable number of other tweaks should serve to improve compatibility for those who have that one weird Windows app that they really can't do without in Linux.

Wine 6.0 has over 8,000 changes to help Windows apps...

  • Wine 6.0 has over 8,000 changes to help Windows apps run on Linux

    Wine recently received an update that improves Windows apps running on Linux. The update comes in the form of Win3 6.0, and includes over 8,300 changes, according to its full release notes (via Tech Radar).

    Wine is a compatibility layer that allows you to run thousands of Windows applications on Linux systems. Wine currently supports over 27,000 Windows applications and games, though it's worth noting that some games require special configuration. Popular supported apps and games include Office, Adobe Photoshop, and World of Warcraft.

    [...]

    Wine 6.0 also includes an experimental Vulkan rendered that translates Direct3D shaders to SPIR-V shaders. In another change related to Direct3D, the Direct3D graphics card database now recognizes more graphics cards and includes updated driver versions.

Wine 6.0 now available to download

  • Wine 6.0 now available to download

    The development team responsible for creating Wine, the compatibility layer capable of running Windows applications on several POSIX-compliant operating systems, such as Linux, macOS, Android and BSD. Has today announced the release of version 6.0.

    “Instead of simulating internal Windows logic like a virtual machine or emulator, Wine translates Windows API calls into POSIX calls on-the-fly, eliminating the performance and memory penalties of other methods and allowing you to cleanly integrate Windows applications into your desktop. This release represents a year of development effort and over 8,300 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements that are listed in the release notes below.”

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More in Tux Machines

Now you can make video calls on a PinePhone (but it’s very much a work in progress)

When the PinePhone began shipping to early adopters, it had all the hardware you’d expect from a smartphone, but it lacked the software needed to make some of that hardware work. If you were one of the first people to get your hands on a PinePhone, you had a Linux-friendly phone with a camera that couldn’t be used to take pictures or record video. But over time kernel and app developers got the phone’s front and rear cameras working, and now most Linux distributions for the PinePhone allow you to take pictures (of mediocre quality). One thing you couldn’t do until recently though? Video calls. But now it looks like that’s possible too… soft of. The process looks rather painful at the moment, but it should get better over time. Read more Also: Plasma Mobile tarball release: bugfixes and new releases

A warning about 5.12-rc1

  • A warning about 5.12-rc1
    Hey peeps - some of you may have already noticed that in my public git
    tree, the "v5.12-rc1" tag has magically been renamed to
    "v5.12-rc1-dontuse". It's still the same object, it still says
    "v5.12-rc1" internally, and it is still is signed by me, but the
    user-visible name of the tag has changed.
    
    
    
    
    The reason is fairly straightforward: this merge window, we had a very
    innocuous code cleanup and simplification that raised no red flags at
    all, but had a subtle and very nasty bug in it: swap files stopped
    working right.  And they stopped working in a particularly bad way:
    the offset of the start of the swap file was lost.
    
    
    
    
    Swapping still happened, but it happened to the wrong part of the
    filesystem, with the obvious catastrophic end results.
    
    
    
    
    Now, the good news is even if you do use swap (and hey, that's nowhere
    near as common as it used to be), most people don't use a swap *file*,
    but a separate swap *partition*. And the bug in question really only
    happens for when you have a regular filesystem, and put a file on it
    as a swap.
    
    
    
    
    And, as far as I know, all the normal distributions set things up with
    swap partitions, not files, because honestly, swapfiles tend to be
    slower and have various other complexity issues.
    
    
    
    
    The bad news is that the reason we support swapfiles in the first
    place is that they do end up having some flexibility advantages, and
    so some people do use them for that reason. If so, do not use rc1.
    Thus the renaming of the tag.
    
    
    
    
    Yes, this is very unfortunate, but it really wasn't a very obvious
    bug, and it didn't even show up in normal testing, exactly because
    swapfiles just aren't normal. So I'm not blaming the developers in
    question, and it also wasn't due to the odd timing of the merge
    window, it was just simply an unusually nasty bug that did get caught
    and is fixed in the current tree.
    
    
    
    
    But I want everybody to be aware of because _if_ it bites you, it
    bites you hard, and you can end up with a filesystem that is
    essentially overwritten by random swap data. This is what we in the
    industry call "double ungood".
    
    
    
    
    Now, there's a couple of additional reasons for me writing this note
    other than just "don't run 5.12-rc1 if you use a swapfile". Because
    it's more than just "ok, we all know the merge window is when all the
    new scary code gets merged, and rc1 can be a bit scary and not work
    for everybody". Yes, rc1 tends to be buggier than later rc's, we are
    all used to that, but honestly, most of the time the bugs are much
    smaller annoyances than this time.
    
    
    
    
    And in fact, most of our rc1 releases have been so solid over the
    years that people may have forgotten that "yeah, this is all the new
    code that can have nasty bugs in it".
    
    
    
    
    One additional reason for this note is that I want to not just warn
    people to not run this if you have a swapfile - even if you are
    personally not impacted (like I am, and probably most people are -
    swap partitions all around) - I want to make sure that nobody starts
    new topic branches using that 5.12-rc1 tag. I know a few developers
    tend to go "Ok, rc1 is out, I got all my development work into this
    merge window, I will now fast-forward to rc1 and use that as a base
    for the next release". Don't do it this time. It may work perfectly
    well for you because you have the common partition setup, but it can
    end up being a horrible base for anybody else that might end up
    bisecting into that area.
    
    
    
    
    And the *final* reason I want to just note this is a purely git
    process one: if you already pulled my git tree, you will have that
    "v5.12-rc1" tag, and the fact that it no longer exists in my public
    tree under that name changes nothing at all for you. Git is
    distributed, and me removing that tag and replacing it with another
    name doesn't magically remove it from other copies unless you have
    special mirroring code.
    
    
    
    
    So if you have a kernel git tree (and I'm here assuming "origin"
    points to my trees), and you do
    
    
    
    
         git fetch --tags origin
    
    
    
    
    you _will_ now see the new "v5.12-rc1-dontuse" tag. But git won't
    remove the old v5.12-rc1 tag, because while git will see that it is
    not upstream, git will just assume that that simply means that it's
    your own local tag. Tags, unlike branch names, are a global namespace
    in git.
    
    
    
    
    So you should additionally do a "git tag -d v5.12-rc1" to actually get
    rid of the original tag name.
    
    
    
    
    Of course, having the old tag doesn't really do anything bad, so this
    git process thing is entirely up to you. As long as you don't _use_
    v5.12-rc1 for anything, having the tag around won't really matter, and
    having both 'v5.12-rc1' _and_ 'v5.12-rc1-dontuse' doesn't hurt
    anything either, and seeing both is hopefully already sufficient
    warning of "let's not use that then".
    
    
    
    
    Sorry for this mess,
                 Linus
    
    
    
    
    
  • A warning about 5.12-rc1

    Linus Torvalds has sent out a note telling people not to install the recent 5.12-rc1 development kernel; this is especially true for anybody running with swap files. "But I want everybody to be aware of because _if_ it bites you, it bites you hard, and you can end up with a filesystem that is essentially overwritten by random swap data. This is what we in the industry call 'double ungood'." Additionally, he is asking maintainers to not start branches from 5.12-rc1 to avoid future situations where people land in the buggy code while bisecting problems.

  •  
  • Linux 5.12-rc2 Likely Coming Early Due To That Nasty File-System Corruption Bug

    Linus Torvalds has now warned developers over using Linux 5.12-rc1 as a basis for their future branches and is looking to release 5.12-rc2 ahead of schedule as a result of that problematic file-system corruption bug stemming from a swap file bug. 

Games: Godot, Artifact, Loop Hero, and Urtuk: The Desolation

  • Godot Showcase - Primal Light developer interview

    Welcome to the fourth developer interview following the introduction of the Godot Showcase page! This week, we are interviewing the studio Fat Gem about their first game Primal Light.

  • Valve gives up on Artifact setting it free with Artifact Classic and Artifact Foundry | GamingOnLinux

    Valve's Dota themed card game Artifact has now well and truly failed, as they've now stopped the 2.0 redevelopment which is now named Artifact Foundry with the original as Artifact Classic and both now free to play. In a post titled "The Future of Artifact", Valve mentioned how the player count fell off dramatically and it was pretty much dead shortly after being released. Even though the big 2.0 revamp was far along in development, they've now formally and totally shelved it as they "haven't managed to get the active player numbers to a level that justifies further development at this time".

  • Loop Hero is out now and I'm going to need help to tear myself away from it | GamingOnLinux

    Loop Hero, probably the only titles I've pre-ordered in the last few years is officially out now and I really will need some help to pull myself away from running just one more loop. It's such a strange and beautifully intoxicating mix of genres. For each loop through you're placed into a world full of nothing but a path and it's up to you to build up the world each time. You do this through your deck of cards, while the hero automatically loops around the path and fights enemies along the way without your input. Even though you don't have direct control, there's quite a lot of strategy involved in it.

  • Dark low-fantasy tactical survival RPG 'Urtuk: The Desolation' is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Urtuk: The Desolation from David Kaleta presents you with a dark world in a low-fantasy settings where you guide a team of survivors through a ruined world. Note: key provided by the developer. Hitting nearly one thousand user reviews and a Very Positive rating on Steam overall, Urtuk: The Desolation seems to have managed to hit a sweet spot. Giving you tough turn-based combat, with a character progression system that sees you extracting skills and traits from fallen enemies. It's a bit of a gross world and the main character, Urtuk, is an escaped subject of experimentation with a severe mutation and worsening health. The idea is to eventually find a cure but getting there will be tough.

today's howtos

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  • How to Install Moodle with Nginx and Let's Encrypt SSL on Ubuntu 20.04

    Moodle is a free and open-source Learning Management System written in PHP. It provides a way for tutors and instructors to create courses for their students or learners. Moodle provides a robust and secure integrated system and comes with a custom dashboard that helps users to access current, past or future courses, as well as review pending work. It is used by many schools, universities, and organizations across the globe and provides a better learning experience. It provides a rich set of features including, wiki, grading, assignment submission, online quizzes, discussion boards, and more. In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Moodle with Nginx web server and Let's Encrypt SSL on Ubuntu 20.04.

  • Install WordPress Automatically on Ubuntu 20.04 using WordOps

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  • How to Find Out When a Webpage Was Published - Make Tech Easier

    When you’re doing research on a topic, it’s vital to ensure your sources are up to date. If you’re writing an academic paper, dates of publication are often required in the citations. The majority of the time, getting the date is easy: simply look on the site and find the published date to find how recent it was. Things get a little more complicated when there is no date listed on the webpage. When this happens, how do you know when a webpage was published?

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  • Another Piece For The Home Network Puzzle – A Return To Cisco IOS! – Jon's FOSS Blog

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    When building a container for a single-page application using any modern JavaScript framework (such as Angular, React, or Vue.js), you might find that the configuration settings are different depending on where the container will run. A typical case would be the base URL for your API, which will differ depending on whether you are testing the application or deploying it into production. Developers usually solve this problem using environment variables. Environment variables typically work on the backend because that is where code runs. But what if your application lives in the user’s browser? There are many ways around this limitation. In some cases, you might build a server whose endpoint holds the necessary parameters. Another workaround is to use PHP to inject the environment variables as globals in the JavaScript code. Both of these options work, but it would be ideal to inject the environment variables as part of the container build process. That way, you don’t have to change the codebase, and you can still deliver the application content using a static web server like NGINX. This article shows you how to inject environment variables directly into your codebase as you build your container.

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