Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Windows Vista

Filed under
Microsoft

At XING on Friday I installed my (free!) copy of Windows Vista on my laptop. I was very skeptical about it, from all of the screenshots and reviews I had seen plastered about the internet I though it looked dire and most of the “new” features seemed to be poor imitations of Apple’s OSX features. How wrong I was.

The search box on the start menu is fantastic, not quite as good out-of-the-box as OpenSuSE’s or the Gnome deskbar, but a welcome addition. By installing a small .NET app, Start++, it is possible to extend the functionality and since it allows you to bind arbitary programs to commands it approaches the power of the deskbar.

The lack of Codec support in Windows Media Player is highly frustrating. WMP has never been able to play many of my videos, so I’ve always used something else like VLC. Unfortunately all of the media players I’ve tried (all 3 of them) have varing degrees of “issues” with Microsoft’s latest OS.

All of these “new” additions to Microsoft’s OS mean, at the moment at least, Vista is about on a par with the latest offerings from the GNU/Linux world (although Vista’s are slightly less configurable).

Full Story.

yeah? well, who f*ckin cares?

it's still Windows, nothing that micro$oft can steal that would change that!

re: yeah?

Microsoft, being the world market leader in both OS's and OFFICE Applications, who exactly do you imagine they stole anything from? Ironic that Open Office built their ENTIRE SUITE to mimic the well established market leader (which is a sound business practice) and yet all the Linux fanboys aren't making snarky remarks about them.

Software is neither a religion or a sports team - there's no need to become emotionally attached. Business is a dog eat everything type of world, and Microsoft is an expert player.

Except for a few exceptions, most of the Linux projects out there couldn't market their way out of a wet paper bag, or figure out what "project leader" means, or focus on something more important then a icon logo for a web browser, or figure out what release dates mean, or release software that doesn't require a PhD in Rocket Surgery to install (or make work).

Perhaps if they could, then Linux too could get a bigger chunk of the pie. At this point in time, the only thing most business suits see when you bring up Linux are people way way way way too focused on the fanatical religious point of view and way too few reasons to buy into that can of worms (to sum it up - not enough ROI).

I think Linux and it's fanboys have a identity crisis. They want to be all "peace, love, and penguin hippieness" and then throw a childish tantrum when no one in the real world will take them seriously.

If you don't like Microsoft, that's fine - but Linux certainly isn't providing a shining example of how to do things right either.

YEAH!

apparently you don't know much about OS history, do you? as you can see i didn't address all microsoft's software as being stolen, i specifically mentioned Windows (and every M$ operating system for that matter, MSDOS was also stolen), microsoft office is superior to any office package out there, no doubt about that, but they should really leave the operating system market to the people who know what they are doing and more about innovation not making a poor attempt to mimic other operating systems, knowing that they can always get the bigger share of the market through monopolization.. and what's a windows vista review doing on a linux site anyway?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Kernel 3.18 development – the kernel column

Linus Torvalds announced Linux 3.17, the Shuffling Zombie Juror, saying, “The past week was fairly calm, and so I have no qualms about releasing 3.17 on the normal schedule”. The latest kernel includes a number of nice headline features, such as the new getrandom() system call and sealed files APIs that we covered in previous issues of LU&D. Linux 3.17 also includes support for less highlighted new features, such as new signature checking of kexec()’d kernel images and sparse files on Samba file systems (which is significant for those mounting Windows and Mac shares). Read more

Qt 5.4 Release Candidate Available

I am happy to announce that Qt 5.4 Release Candidate is now available. After the Qt5.4 Beta release we have done some build & packaging related updates in addition to large number of error fixes based on feedback from Beta release. Read more

Weston's IVI Shell Sees New Version

There hasn't been much in the way of exciting Wayland/Weston developments to report on this month, but its development is continuing in its usual manner. Out today is another version of the Weston IVI Shell as it still works to being accepted upstream. The weston-ivi-shell is a reference shell for Wayland's Weston compositor running on In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) systems. The Weston-IVI work dates back many months and today's revision to the shell marks its eighth public version as it still seeks to be accepted into mainline Weston. Read more

Python 3 Support Added To The GNOME Shell

The GNOME Shell 3.15.2 release fixes some visual glitching, improves the layout of the extension installation dialog, supports the CSS margin property, and offers other bug fixes and minor enhancements. Most notable to GNOME Shell 3.15.2 though is there's finally Python 3 support. Many GNOME components have long ported their Python 2 code to Python 3 while GNOME Shell's Python support has just received the Py3 treatment. Details on GNOME's overall Python 3 porting work can be found via this Wiki page. Read more