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Games: PRIM, Dust: The Abandoned Land and More

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Gaming
  • PRIM looks like an incredible gothic burtonesque adventure with a demo coming soon

    Common Colors are currently creating PRIM, a point and click adventure with traditional frame-by-frame animation and a dark gothic style that's inspired by Tim Burton.

    "Strange things are happening in the Land of the Dead. Instead of reaping souls, Thanatos, the Angel of Death, has to deal with his teenage daughter Prim. Every night, Prim has the same dream: An oddly familiar human boy cries out for her help. Needless to say that our heroine tries to answer the call. There's just one tiny problem: The Grim Reaper has strictly forbidden her to enter the Land of the Living – she's not ready for the immense power she‘d develop there, he claims. When Prim finds a way to trick her dad and travel to Earth, it turns out that Thanatos‘s presentiments have been right all along..."

    It will be getting a Kickstarter campaign at some point but the developer is doing more of a push before that happens. They've announced a demo is going to be launching February 2 with support for Linux, macOS and Windows (and the same for the full release).

  • Dust: The Abandoned Land is a surprising free open-world 2D survival game

    Dust: The Abandoned Land is an in-development 2D open-world survival game, one that has a surprising amount of features and you can play it online with others. Developed by Mathieu Guillame-Bert, a Google Zurich staffer as a hobby.

    Set in a post-apocalyptic randomly generated world, Dust is a real-time survival game with permadeath in an open-world world filled full of strange creatures, robots, bandits, survivors, and remains of military groups. For a free and unfinished game, it's actually quite amusing to play.

    Part of what makes it interesting is the AI system, which the developer mentions uses dynamic behaviour trees that they wrote a piece on a few years ago. It actually feels a little like Project Zomboid, with the Zombies being replaced by a lot more variety.

  • The Ranchers is an upcoming open-world country-life RPG sim

    Love your open-world games? How about farming life sims? The Ranchers looks like another great entry into this more casual and laid-back part of the gaming world. Releasing on Steam sometime "early" this year, RedPilzStudio could be onto a hit here. As for Linux support, the developer confirmed it very clearly on Steam.

    "After years of living in the metropolis' stressful and hectic life, you finally decide to leave everything behind to buy your first lot of land in the country and start a new life, in the quiet, close to nature. However, your skills as a farmer and manager will be put to the test to make your Ranch a prosperous business and earn the villagers' respect and esteem. And who knows, maybe find love and start a family."

  • Stadia gets Scott Pilgrim vs. the World and HITMAN 3 this month

    For the Stadia users amongst our readership: two more big name games will be heading to the Linux and Vulkan powered game streaming service this month. Interestingly, both of which outside of Stadia will be Epic Games Store exclusives for at least a year and so will not be available on Steam at release.

  • Shot in the Dark is a clever tough platformer where enemies blend into the background

    Shot in the Dark needs you to have good platforming skills, good point and click aiming skills and it's a whole lot of fun if you're up for the challenge. Note: key provided by the developer.

    Released with Linux support on January 12 from developer Possum House Games, the idea of it is seriously great. It's an action-platforming that requires precision in more ways than one. Using a very simply and quite limited colour palette that's largely black, white and red - a lot of things blend together. You need to pick out the enemies from the background and take them down.

More in Tux Machines

openSUSE "Leap" 15.2 - Any Good?

This is a review I've been wanting to write since forever. Having tried many iterations of SUSE Linux over its long life before, during and after the Novell era, it always left me feeling ambivalent. And I really wanted to like it. The last time I set out to write a review but then canned the idea was for 12.3, when images would work in VMware Player but did not boot on my real hardware. Now THAT is a long time ago and it also means a lot may have changed, hopefully for the better. SUSE is known and often praised for their offering of a highly polished KDE desktop. This is what I will go for in this little experiment. On the download page we can choose between a netinstall image for openSUSE "Leap" approx. 125 MB in size for x86_64 and the full DVD image of 4.3 GB. This is the equivalent of the box set of olden days. Live images are available with the KDE Plasma and Gnome desktops as well as a Rescue Live CD which are all staying under 1 GB in size, but only the rescue image is small enough to burn to CD. All images can be written to USB and DVD. Community maintained ports are also available for ARM, the Raspberry Pi and PPC architectures. Instructions to install or change to "Leap" as well as minimum system requirements are further down the page. Quite a traditional selection really. The web page layout is simple and clear and conveys the most pertinent information right away. Years ago installing from live image was not recommended so the choice here is basically between downloading the entire library or the netinstall image. I decided to go for the netinstall. Not having an installable live image obviously robs us of the test run people have become accustomed to unless we down yet another image just for testing. I decided against that as we can see from the netinstall image whether openSUSE will boot up or not. The rest is just desktop showcasing. I downloaded images for the x86_64 architecture. Read more

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

  • Two Powerful SSD Benchmark Utilities for Linux

    The 21st century has seen unprecedented growth in the technological sector, and many upgrades have been made in the past several years. The evolution of phones from landlines to smartphones is a clear indicator of this technological phenomenon. The latter has become a key part of our lives, providing us a means to connect with the world around us. The desktops and laptops that we use today have also seen major progression, and this can be observed in the improvement in the quality of tools and games in the world of computers. One such sector in the computer world is that of memory storage, which has quickly moved on from traditional hard disks to a newer, faster type of storage called a solid-state drive, or SSD for short. SSDs are extremely fast, require less power, and are more shock-resistant than HDDs. You can see this for yourself by benchmarking your SSDs. Benchmarking is the process of measuring the performance of any tool, which can be done using a benchmarking utility. This article looks at two of the best utilities available for SSD benchmarking in the Linux operating system, Disks and hdparm.

  • Radeon ROCm 4.0.1 Released For AMD Open-Source GPU Compute

    Last month marked the release of the big Radeon Open eCosystem 4.0 update (ROCm 4.0) while today that has been replaced by a v4.0.1 point release. ROCm 4.0 brought CDNA / MI100 (Arcturus) compute support and other "Exascale Era" preparations in making this open-source GPU compute stack competitor more competitive with NVIDIA's CUDA. For now though it's still been leaving out the Navi GPU support.

  • Linux Foundation Public Health Joins The Fight Against COVID-19 Pandemic

    Brian Behlendorf is one of the most respected luminaries of the open-source world. He has been heading the Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger project since its inception and recently took over additional responsibilities of the Linux Foundation Public Health.

Devices and Open Hardware Leftovers

  • Rugged mini-PC dips into Elkhart Lake

    Neousys unveiled a fanless, 112 x 87 x 50mm “POC-40” computer with an up to 3.0GHz, dual-core Atom x6211E plus up to 32GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 4x USB, 3x M.2, and DP, 2x serial, and isolated DIO. Last month, Neousys announced one of the first Intel Elkhart Lake based embedded PCs with its ultra-compact (153 x 108 x 56mm) POC-400. The company has followed up with an even smaller (112 x 87 x 50mm) and similarly rugged POC-40 using the same 10nm processor family. The industrial, DIN-rail mountable mini-PC supports applications such as space-constrained factory data collection systems, rugged edge computers, and mobile gateways.

  • Pipo W12 Arm Windows 10 Laptop finally launched for $422 and up

    The project provides a Debian image for the aforementioned Yoga C630, so with some efforts a port to Pipo W12 may be possible.

  • Arduino Blog » Access control unit designed with a Raspberry Pi CM4 and an Arduino Micro

    Whether granting access to public transit or restricting unauthorized personnel in buildings, NFC card readers can be extremely useful. Although most might not consider how they work – and simply happy getting through a turnstile – there’s a lot going on behind the scenes. In his video, Daniel Raines shows off a pair of prototype access control units (ACUs) that he’s constructed. The two networked devices are each based on a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 along with an Arduino Micro that controls six relays to allow or deny entry, provide feedback, fire, and lock up.

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  • Arduino Blog » 2002 Audio TT dashboard gets a digital speedometer upgrade with a custom CAN bus shield

    While it’s hard to beat analog instruments for instantaneous automotive feedback, Finnish electrical engineering student Jussi Ristiniemi also wanted a digital speed readout on his 2002 Audi TT. His particular model normally uses the car’s controller area network (CAN) to transmit the radio station or CD track to the uppermost section of the digital display. For this speedometer mod, audio data was replaced with “KM/H” readings, supplied by the vehicle’s CAN bus system via an Arduino Nano and custom interface shield.

4MLinux 35.1 released.

This is a minor (point) release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel, which comes with the Linux kernel 5.4.85. The 4MLinux Server now includes Apache 2.4.46, MariaDB 10.5.8, and PHP 7.4.13 (see this post for more details). You can update your 4MLinux by executing the "zk update" command in your terminal (fully automatic process). Read more