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Linux Fanboy Meets, Struggles With, and Wins Against a Windows 10 ISO

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GNU
Linux

Recently I decided that it was time to bite the bullet and start using Windows 10 on at least one of my main computers. I'm pretty new here, so you probably don't know that I'm a big fan of Linux.

I've used many different Debian based distros over the years, and not long ago I installed Pop!_OS (created by System76 for their Linux machines) on my desktop computer(Unfortunately not a System76). So far, no regrets.

[...]

At this moment in time, given my current hardware, I suppose the only way to prepare a Windows 10 ISO correctly is through Windows 10. Maybe I missed some crucial piece along the way.

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