Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Restrict Access To Your Private Debian Repository

Filed under
HowTos

There are many times where it is useful to setup a small repository for apt-get to install packages from. The downside of placing such a repository in a publicly available place means that other people might start using it. Here we'll look at a couple of simple ways of restricting access.

There are many reasons why you might want to have restricted access to your repository:

* The repository contains packages for internal use, personal and/or commercial.
* You host a private mirror for your company.
* You are a software vendor that provides commercial updates for packages.
* You are a software vendor that provides proprietary software for Linux and want to integrate it with apt-get

User/Password authentication

1) Using ftp/sftp

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Kernel Space/Linux

today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more