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Novell, Red Hat Compare Desktop Linux Programs

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Linux

Open-source rivals Novell and Red Hat are each highlighting initiatives to bring Linux-based functionality to the desktop.

Novell, at its BrainShare 2007 convention this week in Salt Lake City, detailed improvements to its Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) 10 product, introduced in July 2006, while Red Hat provided more details about the desktop capability of its new Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5 operating system.

Jeffrey Jaffe, Novell's chief technology officer, said a Service Pack upgrade to SLED 10 is now available. Service Packs usually just include bug fixes, Jaffe said, but Novell's adds desktop virtualization and the ability to run Windows in a Linux environment, part of Novell's recently announced collaboration with Windows creator Microsoft.

Red Hat, meanwhile, provided details about its desktop strategy in a blog posting by Paul Cormier, Red Hat's executive vice president of engineering. RHEL 5 was officially unveiled March 14.

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