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Integrating Citrix Applications into Linux Desktop (SLED10)

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HowTos

One of my colleagues pokes fun at me because I prefer to use Linux through the graphical interface and seek to avoid the command line when possible. I prefer this because I have high demands of Linux as a user friendly tool and it usually meets my expectations. That being said, the command line and Linux's ease of access to configuration files call you to leave the graphical world once in a while to make some very powerful changes that make the graphical world much better.

One such example are the steps to modify the configuration of the Gnome-Main-Menu (better known as the "Computer" button) to include Citrix applications so users can simply click an icon to launch remote applications hosted on Citrix Servers.

The following describes changes we made to include Citrix Applications into the Gnome Main Menu and how we did them.

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