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Manjaro 20.2 Nibia got released

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Linux

We are happy to announce our latest release of Manjaro we call Nibia.

Some might want to shoot for the moon - well, we shoot for the four moons of Nibia.

Last, but not least, our installer Calamares also received many improvements. Among other things, it now supports encrypted systems without encrypted /boot partition. This enables graphical password dialogs, using non-us keymaps for inputting passwords and up to 1 minute shorter boot times compared to full disk encryption. Automatic partitioning still uses full disk encryption by default.

We hope you enjoy this release and let us know what you think of Nibia.

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Also: Manjaro 20.2 Brings Arch-Based Linux 5.9 Experience, GNOME Version Defaults To Wayland

Arch Linux-based Manjaro 20.2 Nibia ready for download with Xfce

  • Arch Linux-based Manjaro 20.2 Nibia ready for download with Xfce, GNOME, and KDE

    Manjaro is one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems these days, and it isn't hard to see why. It is based on the rock-solid Arch, but unlike that distro, Manjaro is very easy to install and use. In other words, it has all the benefits of Arch, but without the hassles and headaches. This makes it a great choice for both Linux experts and beginners.

    Today, Manjaro 20.2 "Nibia," becomes available for download with a trio of desktop environment options -- Xfce (4.14), GNOME (3.38.2), and KDE Plasma (5.20.4). All three DEs are excellent, but Xfce is what the developers consider the "flagship." With that said, the official release announcement claims the GNOME variant has received a bulk of the changes in Nibia.

Manjaro Linux 20.2 “Nibia” Is Out With Pop Shell And Material

Manjaro Linux 20.2 'Nibia' is out now

  • Manjaro Linux 20.2 'Nibia' is out now

    Manjaro Linux, the middle-ground distribution for those who want regular updates but don't want to go to Arch directly has a brand new release out.

    For users who run Manjaro already, you just need to run updates as normal since it's something of a semi-rolling distribution that keeps updates flowing in. For new users, this releases serve as the entry point with new downloadable media with all the latest customizations sorted.

    Manjaro Linux 20.2 'Nibia' updates all editions and desktops available, with their GNOME 3.38 update being "possibly the biggest update" they've done so far. GNOME 3.38 was released back in September, bringing with it some great enhancements like better multi-monitor support.

Manjaro Linux 20.2 has Been Unleashed

  • Manjaro Linux 20.2 has Been Unleashed

    Aside from the regular expected updates, such as kernel 5.9, Pamac 9.5.12, and GNOME 3.38.2, the 20.02 release from the developers of Manjaro Linux has a few added surprises that might intrigue many a user.

    One of the coolest features to be found in Manjaro “Nibia” is borrowed from System76’s Pop!_OS. This feature is called Pop Shell and makes it possible to quickly enable automatic window tiling with a click of a button. For anyone who likes their application windows to always be perfectly organized on their desktop, this new tiling feature will go a long way to scratch that itch.

    But Manjaro Linux 20.2 isn’t just limited to one tiling option. If your device happens to have a touch screen, you can opt for the Material Shell take, which enables touch-friendly automatic window tiling. So whether you have a standard mouse interface or a touch interface, you can enjoy window tiling.

Manjaro 20.2 GNOME Edition overview

How to install Manjaro 20.2 GNOME Edition - YouTube

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