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today's leftovers

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  • Day 2: Perl is dead. Long live Perl and Raku. – Raku Advent Calendar

    ‘Perl is dead’, is a meme that’s just plain wrong. Perl isn’t dead. It’s just dead to some programmers. Complicated regexes? Sigils? There’s more than one way to do it (TMTOWTDI)? Sometimes when programmers encounter Perl in the wild they react with fear. “WTF!?”, they cry! But fear needn’t be a Perl killer. If you take the time to see past Perl’s imperfections and walk the learning curve, there are rich rewards: Perl is an imperfect but pragmatic and expressive language that for 30+ years has helped programmers get the job done.

    When Larry Wall designed Raku he fixed most of Perl’s imperfections and doubled down on Perl’s DNA. Perl values pragmatism, expressivity, and whipupitude and Raku does too! Why stop at sigils ($@%) when you can have twice the fun with twigils ($!, %!, @! etc)?

    For some programmers, however, the mere sight of a twigil can induce fear. Like Perl, Raku’s expressive power is a double-edged sword – potentially stopping other programmers in their tracks. A Raku programmer’s, “DWIM” (do what I mean) can be another programmer’s “WAT!?”

  • Deriving Patterns of Fraud from the Enron Dataset

    Enron filed for bankruptcy on December 2, 2001. Arthur Anderson, one of the “Big Five” accounting firms, which audited the financial statements was dissolved as a result of the Enron scandal.

    The Enron email and financial datasets are big, messy treasure troves of information, which become much more useful once you know your way around them a bit. Enron’s complete data may be downloaded from this link here, and the refined pickle files may be downloaded from the following Github repository along with the complete code used in this article.

  • Qt Quick MultiEffect

    If you read the recent Qt Marketplace blog post, you may have noticed that something called Qt Quick MultiEffect has become available. This blog post gives more details on what Quick MultiEffect actually is and why you might want to consider using it in your Qt Quick projects.

    Let's start with a bit of background information. Qt Graphical Effects module contains a set of effects which can be used in Qt Quick user interfaces. These cover blur, shadow, mask, contrast etc. effects which can be easily applied into Quick items. When you need a single effect, these are great. But when you want to use multiple effects at the same time, performance is not optimal, because each effect renders into FBO texture which next effect then uses as its source. Because of this separation of effects, shaders also can't share calculations and textures. So multiple Qt Graphical Effects increase GPU and memory usage a bit more than desired.

  • Graylog provides end-user advancements in latest platform update

    Server Side Public License-Beginning with v4.0, Graylog Open Source will be licensed under the Server Side Public License (SSPL). First introduced by MongoDB, the SSPL license provides similar open source rights to GPL v3, and additionally extends those rights to cover cloud and SaaS offerings.

  • WordPress 5.6 Release Candidate 2 – WordPress.org

    WordPress 5.6 is slated for release on December 8, 2020, and we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.6 yet, now is the time!

  • 4 talks from Bootlin at Live Embedded Event, December 3

    As we announced back in October, Bootlin has participated to the organization of a new online conference around embedded systems: Live Embedded Event, which will take place on December 3. The registration is totally free, and the event will propose 4 tracks throughout the day, covering a wide range of topics. We encourage you to register and participate to the event!

  • Librem 14 Status Update: EVT2 Sample Is Almost There – Purism

    We truly think of the Librem 14 as our dream laptop here at Purism, and because of that and because this is a brand new design compared to the Librem 13 we find ourselves nitpicking a bit more than usual as our design becomes a reality.

    As part of this nitpicking process we make EVT (Engineering Verification Test) samples which allow us not only to fine-tune our manufacturing process, it also allows us to physically examine the laptop. Using kill switches, using the keyboard, examining the print on the case and keyboard–all these and other tests help us refine things so that the final product is something we are proud of. In addition to the more cosmetic bugs we list below, it also helps us find larger bugs. For instance we discovered issues not just with the microphone but also an issue that limited the 2nd SO-DIMM slot to 16GB RAM. We needed to re-do the PCB to address both of these issues.

    We know a lot of people have been interested to see pictures of the actual Librem 14 instead of just renders. We have made the second round of EVT samples a few weeks ago and have finally gotten a chance to take some high-quality pictures to share. We are almost there! There are just a few more tweaks we want to make that will only add a few weeks to our shipping plan, but we think it’s important to get everything perfect. With the holidays this will likely mean shipping won’t start until the beginning of January.

  • DIY Pi KVM: An easy and cheap KVM over IP for Raspberry Pi

    Traditional IP-KVM systems may cost you hundreds of dollars. DIY Pi KVM over IP is a very simple and fully functional Raspberry Pi-based KVM over IP that you can make yourself. If you do not know what IP-KVM is, it stands for keyboard, video, and mouse. It allows you to connect to a computer or a server remotely. With this, you can fix problems such as configuring the BIOS or reinstalling the OS using a virtual CD-ROM or flash drive.

  • Sparky news 2020/11

    The 11th monthly Sparky project and donate report of 2020...

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in November 2020 · utkarsh2102

    Here’s my (fourteenth) monthly update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world.

    [...]

    This was my 23rd month of contributing to Debian. I became a DM in late March last year and a DD last Christmas! \o/

    Apart from doing a bunch of activitites like attending KubeCon + RubyConf (blog to follow!), et al and simultaneously giving my undergrad exams, I did (relatively) more work than I had really anticipated!

  • FOSS Activities in November 2020

    Second month of doing these posts. In short not much has been happening the past weeks, but that would be a slight lie.

    I have sponsored rgacognes Trusted User application. The application was posted to the mailing list, and it’s currently being voted and decided by a weeks time.

    There has also been some discussion for years about bringing debug packages into Arch. This has largely been stalled but I brought it back to life again. Essentially the problem might be solved by utilizing the new debuginfod project, and we can later distribute the packages itself when we understand the new mirror requirements. There is currently a discussion on [arch-dev-public] about it.

    Along with the above, chugging along nicely with packages. Python has been rebuilt for the Python 3.9 release. This means there hasn’t been as many python package updates. Currently everything is in testing and we should see packages move to the stable repositories early next week. I simply haven’t been bothered going through the hoops of releasing package updates into stable and then deal with a rebuild for python 3.9 for testing.

  • A New Endeavour | LINUX Unplugged 382 | Jupiter Broadcasting

    A problem that just kept getting worse and worse. What it was, and why it led us to "check in" on EndeavourOS.

  • Top 10 Tools to Automate Linux Admin Tasks – Linux Hint

    If you are a Linux administrator, or you want to become one, there are certain tasks that can become repetitive and boring. In fact, back in the day, some tasks were so incredibly repetitive that it became very hard to keep track of all the servers; this is why automation tools were created to help with such tasks. These tools help you manage and administer different servers or systems at once, and some of them allow you to do a particular task with only a click or a command line. These tools mentioned below will definitely help you automate some of the tasks of a system administrator so that you can concentrate on other interesting concepts and tasks.

    Here are the top 10 Linux Admins to boost office productivity and ease of access. Click on the links to visit the homepage.

  • Google Anthos Gets Edgy on Bare Metal Servers - SDxCentral

    Google’s Anthos hybrid cloud platform now runs on bare metal servers. The move targets enterprise workloads running in on-premises data centers or edge locations, and the announcement preempts a ton of new products and capabilities that rival Amazon Web Services (AWS) will undoubtedly rollout at its annual re:Invent, which kicks off today.

    Anthos is Google’s fully managed, Kubernetes-based platform that allows users to manage their data and applications in an on-premises environment or across cloud platforms from rivals like AWS and Microsoft. Google announced the platform at its Cloud Next event in 2018, and made it generally available last year.

  • Mandriva Linux Chronicles: Good-bye, ZaReason!

    The best laptop I have ever owned (and still own, despite being purchased 6 years ago) is a ZaReason Strata.

    It is still working great, but I was one of these days fishing the market for Linux laptops, just in case.

    When I visited the ZaReason page several months ago this year, I saw that they had very few products. This year has been tough.

  • Oil and gas industry embraces open-source collaboration, encourages greener energy solutions [Ed: Greenwashing plus Openwashing]

    Krebbers and Liz Dennett (pictured, left), lead solutions architect at Amazon Web Services Inc., spoke with Rebecca Knight, host of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s livestreaming studio, during the AWS Executive Summit. They discussed how the Open Group OSDU Forum is reinventing the energy data platform. (* Disclosure below.)

ZaReason Linux PC Vendor Closes After More Than A Decade

  • ZaReason Linux PC Vendor Closes After More Than A Decade Of Selling Linux Hardware

    After a long run and being one of the early boutique Linux PC vendors, California-based laptop/desktop/server vendor ZaReason is the latest casualty of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    ZaReason had been around since 2008 offering Linux across various laptops, desktops, and servers. In recent years we've heard less from the Berkeley based company as they battled increased competition from the likes of System76, Purism, Tuxedo Computers, and also more Linux pre-loaded devices coming directly from the likes of Lenovo and Dell. ZaReason offered Ubuntu and other Linux distributions on their systems that ranged from Intel NUC devices to customed Sager laptops geared for Linux/open-source driver support.

GNU/Linux PC company ZaReason goes out of business

  • Linux PC company ZaReason goes out of business due to COVID-19

    But one of the nice things about buying a computer running free and open source software is that there’s no shortage of community-based support including forums, chats, and social media groups. And existing customers who are unhappy with the operating system that came with with their computer (the company used to offer a choice of various Linux distros), can always download and install the operating system of their choice as a replacement.

    Meanwhile if you’re in the market for a new PC that comes with Linux pre-installed, there are a growing number of options. System76 has been around for years, and Purism has been making interesting moves in this space (including launching one of the first Linux smartphones).

    In Europe, there’s Tuxedo Computers and SlimBook (which also sells Windows computers).

    And major PC makers including Dell, Lenovo, and HP offer a number of systems with Linux these days as well.

Well-Known Linux Laptop Seller Forced to Close

  • Well-Known Linux Laptop Seller Forced to Close

    And sadly for customers of the California-based PC seller its cessation means any active warranty or planned software support has ended too.

    In a storefront notice ZaReason write: “…our product line has been getting smaller and our tech support has been slowing down to a crawl. Unfortunately, the pandemic has been the final KO blow. It has hit our little town hard and we have not been able to recover from it.”

Linux hardware vendor ZaReason has officially closed up shop

  • Linux hardware vendor ZaReason has officially closed up shop

    Always sad when a Linux-focused business fails. ZaReason announced recently that they're no longer in business.

    ZaReason aren't even a name that was heard all that often, which is part of the problem. You hear a lot about System76, TUXEDO, Slimbook, Star Labs and other Linux vendors but ZaReason gradually reduced their output and now we know why.

    In the statement they sent out it mentioned how their product line was getting smaller and their tech support was "slowing down to a crawl". So what happened? Well, "the pandemic has been the final KO blow" they said with their "little town" being hit hard and they've been unable to recover from it. They officially shut on November 24, 2020. No other reasons were given but it's likely increased competition from the previously mentioned vendors plus the likes of Dell, Lenovo and others in the Linux space also not helping them.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Coming in glibc 2.33: Reloadable nsswitch.conf

    In my previous article about nsswitch.conf I talked about how simple, perhaps too simple, this config file is to use. What I didn’t cover then was how simplistic its internal implementation is. Specifically, an application only loads this file once—the first time it’s needed. So, what do you do when nsswitch.conf needs to change? How do you update all of the running applications? You don’t! The only way to force a reload is to stop the application and restart it. That is not always an option, especially for critical applications that might take a long time to restart. Recent work behind the scenes in the GNU C library will change all of this. As of glibc version 2.33, this config file now reloads and reparses each time it changes, and only the configuration is reloaded. If the configuration calls for an external shared library to be loaded, that object is only ever loaded once. It may be called in a different sequence, or not called at all, but it is never unloaded. This behavior avoids a whole class of problems related to unloading shared objects that might still be in use.

  • SEGGER's Complete J-Link Software Now Available for Linux on ARM

    SEGGER’s entire portfolio of J-Link software is now available for Linux on ARM, for both 32-bit and 64-bit platforms. This includes both the command-line programs and GUI tools such as J-Flash, J-Flash SPI, J-Scope, the J-Link Configurator, and the GUI version of the GDB Server. “J-Link can now be used on Raspberry Pi and other ARM-based machines, without any limitations,” says Alex Grüner, CTO at SEGGER. “Small single-board ARM computers now offer the same functionality as x86 powered machines. The inexpensive Raspberry Pi and similar boards are now viable options, especially in test farms and production environments.”

  • Bootstrappable builds

    The idea of Reproducible Builds—being able to recreate bit-for-bit identical binaries using the same source code—has gained momentum over the last few years. Reproducible builds provide some safeguards against bad actors in the software supply chain. But building software depends on the tools used to construct the binary, including compilers and build-automation tools, many of which depend on pre-existing binaries. Minimizing the reliance on opaque binaries for building our software ecosystem is the goal of the Bootstrappable Builds project. For example, GCC is written in C and C++, which means that it requires compilers for those two languages in order to be built from source. In practice, that generally means a distribution would use its existing binary executables of those tools to build a new GCC version, which would then be released to users. One of the concerns with that approach is described in Unix inventor Ken Thompson's Turing Award lecture "Reflections on Trusting Trust" [PDF]. In a nutshell, Thompson said that trusting the output of a binary compiler is an act of faith that someone has not tampered with the creation of that binary—even if the source code is available. The Bootstrappable Builds project was started as an offshoot of the Reproducible Builds project during the latter's 2016 summit in Berlin. A bootstrappable build takes the idea of reproducibility one step further, in some sense. The build of a target binary can be reproduced alongside the build of the tools required to do so. It is, conceptually, almost like building a house from a large collection of atoms of different elements.

  • Parasoft Accelerates CI/CD Pipeline Through Partnership With IAR Systems

    IAR Build Tools for Linux uses the leading build tools from IAR Embedded Workbench and empowers software developers who build safety-critical applications to work directly on the Linux host environment, eliminating toolchain version management.

  • Josef Strzibny: Working with decimals in Elixir

    Integers are not enough, and floats are flawed? Decimals to the rescue! A short guide of what’s important when working with decimals in Elixir. This post is about the Decimal 2.0 module from decimal Hex package. As with every module in Elixir, running h Module and Module.module_info in IEx is a good place to start.

  • Swift Deploys: Dealing with Anti-Patterns and Unresolved Issues

    In a long end-of-the-year blog post, Charity Majors, co-founder and CTO of honeycomb.io, discussed lead time to deploy, or “the interval encompassing the time from when the code gets written and when it’s been deployed to production.”

  • Perl weekly challenge 95

    You are given a number $N. Write a script to figure out if the given number is Palindrome. Print 1 if true otherwise 0.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 95: Palindrome Numbers and Demo Stack
  • Learn awk by coding a "guess the number" game | Opensource.com

    Once you understand these concepts, you can start figuring the rest out. For example, most languages have a "way of doing things" supported by their design, and those ways can be quite different from one program to another. These ways include modularity (grouping related functionality together), declarative vs. imperative, object-orientation, low- vs. high-level syntactic features, and so on. An example familiar to many programmers is "ceremony," that is, the amount of work required to set the scene before tackling the problem. The Java programming language is said to have a significant ceremony requirement, stemming from its design, which requires all code to be defined within a class.

  • The terminal, the console and the shell - what are they?

    The other day, as I was going through some of my old notes, I stumbled upon something I had written about the console, the terminal and the shell on Unix-like operating systems. I have decided to rewrite these notes in order to share them here on my website. So without further ado we will now stroll down memory lane and take a quick look at the origins of the Unix terminal and shell. And I will also give my advice to new users on Linux or BSD regarding the choice of terminal emulator and shell.

Raspberry Pi: EasyOS, YARH.IO, Proprietary Blobs and Inkplate

     
  • Current status of EasyOS on the Pi4

    The videos seem to play OK though. Regarding the hanging, SM seems to be waiting on a response from youtube.com, so I don't know if that is a problem with youtube.com or the network interface. Regarding point-3, sometimes just replugging the USB-stick is sufficient to get it recognized. But sometimes replugging multiple times still does not work.

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  • Stripped-down Raspberry Pi 3B+ SBC powers YARH.IO Micro 2 DIY handheld PC

    We’ve already seen a few DIY Raspberry Pi-based handheld computers in the past with the likes of Zero Terminal V3 or hgTerm powered by a Raspberry Pi Zero and a stripped-down Raspberry Pi 3 board respectively. So why not another? YARH.IO Micro 2 DIY handheld PC is based on a Raspberry Pi 3B+ SBC stripped from its Ethernet port, whose double stack USB connectors have been replaced with single stack USB connectors. The DIY computer also adds off-the-shelf parts with a 4″ touch screen display and a Bluetooth keyboard without touchpad, and gets its power from a 3,500 mAh battery.

  • Get VMware on Raspberry Pi
             
  • 2.5-inch "Industrial Pi" Pico-ITX SBC offers PoE , mini DP++ port

    Inkplate 10 also supports Peripheral Mode which allows you to control the display from another board such as Raspberry Pi or Arduino via commands sent over a UART or USB connection.

Xfce 4.16 Desktop Lands in openSUSE Tumbleweed, Download Now

If you’ve been waiting for Xfce 4.16 to land in openSUSE Tumbleweed, I have some good news today as the wait is over and you can install the desktop environment right now from distribution’s software repositories and upgrade from Xfce 4.14. Xfce 4.16 brings many goodies for fans of the lightweight desktop environment, including fractional scaling, dark mode for the Panel, CSD (Client-side decorations) support for all the Settings dialogs, a revamped About Xfce dialog with info about CPU, GPU and RAM, as well as a refreshed look with new icons and color palette. Read more

Carbon Player – desktop media player

My favorite pastime is to see an eclectic range of bands, solo artists, and orchestras live. It’s such a life-changing and exhilarating experience to be present. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a CD or watching music videos on TV or on YouTube, but being with an audience, packed out in a stadium or music hall, takes it to another level. But it’s an expensive pastime, and still on hold given the current coronavirus pandemic. I’m therefore listening to music from my CD collection which I’ve encoded to FLAC, a lossless audio format, and stored locally. Linux offers a huge array of open source music players. And many of them are high quality. I’ve reviewed the vast majority for LinuxLinks, but I’m endeavoring to explore every free music player in case there’s an undiscovered gem. Carbon Player is a cross-platform media player written in JavaScript and uses Electron, an open-source software framework developed and maintained by GitHub. Let’s see how Carbon Player fares. Read more