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today's leftovers

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  • 5 Reasons Why KDE Plasma = Best Desktop Environment

    KDE Plasma is my favorite desktop environment on Linux. In this video, I offer my Top 5 Reasons why I think KDE Plasma is the best desktop environment for me.

  • Inspired by the likes of Cube World, open source RPG Veloren has the biggest update yet | GamingOnLinux

    Currently in development and not yet considered a full game but still very impressive anyway, Veloren is a free and open source multiplayer voxel RPG. Inspired by the likes of Cube World, Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Dwarf Fortress and Minecraft it's a very exciting project to be following. Written in the popular Rust programming language it fully supports Linux, macOS and Windows.

    This latest release is the biggest yet, with overhauls to various parts of the game as well as introducing plenty of new features to keep players busy.

    [...]

    The full source code is up on GitLab.

  • Godot Engine - Godot's 2D engine gets several improvements for upcoming 4.0

    While the focus of Godot 4.0 Vulkan rewrite has largely been enhancements to the 3D engine, the 2D side will also see several improvements.

    Improved Performance

    Thanks to Vulkan (which has a much lower draw-call cost than OpenGL), 2D itself in Godot 4.0 will see a speedup for free. But that's not the only reason, many internal improvements and optimizations also contribute to a smoother experience. Changes in memory allocation strategy and internal simplification in draw call logic make it much more efficient to manually call thousands of draw() functions from a node's _draw() callback. Many of these improvements will also accelerate GLES3 and GLES2 back-ends.

    Improved 2D lighting

    Godot 3.x supported 2D lighting, but this did not happen without several constraints. The main one was performance due to every light being rendered in a separate draw pass. This is no longer a problem in 4.0, as all lights are drawn in a single pass.

  • Auditing the CRLs in CRLite • Insufficient.Coffee

    Since Firefox Nightly is now using CRLite to determine if enrolled websites’ certificates are revoked, it’s useful to dig into the data to answer why a given certificate issuer gets enrolled or not.

    Ultimately this is a matter of whether the CRLs for a given issuer are available to CRLite, and are valid, but the Internet is a messy place, and sometimes things don’t work as planned. If an issuing CA is not enrolled in CRLite, the Mozilla infrastructure emits enough information to figure out what went wrong.

  • How to install FreeBSD on Raspberry Pi? (step-by-step guide)

    FreeBSD is an original operating system you can install on Raspberry Pi to experiment a bit outside Linux. But the process is not always easy if you are used to working on Debian-like systems.

    Today, we’ll see how to install it on a Raspberry Pi, to configure it and use it like almost like any other operating system.

  • October/November in KDE Itinerary

    A lot has happened around KDE Itinerary in the past two months again, since the last summary blog. All components will be part of the KDE release service starting with the 20.12 series, we got a new backend server for the station maps, arrival and departure platforms are now properly identified, and much more.

    [...]

    The biggest news behind the scenes is that the new backend for maps.kde.org is now finally live! This gives us up-to-date OSM data for the train station maps, with a lot more detail and various precision loss issues fixed. Most visible is probably that we now also see platform section labels and ticket machines, as well as almost all geometry reassembly glitches being fixed now.

    This work not only helps KDE Itinerary, but also the primary user of this system, Marble. A big thank you to the sysadmin team for making that happen!

    A number of things are happening around KDE’s Android infrastructure as well, which KDE Itinerary relies upon. See the dedicated post on that.

  • About Intel NUC Computer
  • About Asus Chromebox – Linux Hint

    In partnership with Google, Asus joined the bandwagon in reinventing desktops into smaller forms and integrating Chrome OS into it, breathing new life to the declining traditional forms. Asus Chromebox is an elegantly-styled, lightweight, compact, and versatile desktop. It’s highly favored by users who only need the basics of a desktop computer, such as web browsing, video streaming, and simple file processing. Furthermore, it has full support for Android apps on Google play. The price tag is also pocket-friendly, especially if you are content with lower-end models. There is also no need to install anti-virus software as the built-in security with Chrome OS automatically installs updates and fixes, keeping it safe from some malware and viruses. Although Asus Chromebox has not been the first in the market, it has been making waves since its introduction in 2014.

More in Tux Machines

Broadcom Valkyrie/Viper VK Accelerators Set To See Mainline Support With Linux 5.12

For nearly one year Broadcom engineers have been working on Linux mainline drivers for their VK accelerators. Finally with the upcoming Linux 5.12 kernel the support is in place for those Broadcom Viper and Valkyrie accelerator cards. These Broadcom accelerator cards interface via PCI Express and provide offload engines for video transcoding and other tasks. These accelerator cards can be used for other real-time, high performance, high throughput offload compute purposes like around image and audio operations as well as crypto. Read more

Android Leftovers

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, Homelab, and Tabliss

  • Eating the License Cake | LINUX Unplugged 390

    Successful open-source projects all seem to struggle with one major gorilla. Who it is, and what their options are now. Special Guests: Drew DeVore and Jonathan Corbet.

  • The Raspberry Pi is a great way to get started with Homelab! (How to Homelab Episode 4)

    If you're looking for a low-cost way to enter into the world of Homelab, look no further than the Raspberry Pi! These small computers are plenty powerful to run quite a few Homelab apps, and in this video I give you my thoughts on why that is. In a future video, we'll explore running some apps on the Raspberry Pi but I wanted to create this video as an introduction to the concept of using a Pi in this way

  • Tabliss Is A "New Tab" Plugin For Firefox and Chrome

    Tabliss is a beautiful, customisable "New Tab" page for Firefox and Chrome, and the browsers that base of Firefox and Chrome (such as LibreWolf and Brave). In particular, it solves the "empty tab" problem that I was having on LibreWolf

Games: Cyber Shadow, Ova Magica, Plex Arcade Flunks

  • With some epic 8-bit styled artwork Cyber Shadow is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Cyber Shadow from Aarne "MekaSkull" Hunziker and Yacht Club Games is an epic throwback to the likes of Ninja Gaiden and Shadow Of The Ninja and it's out now with Linux support. Nice the see Yacht Club give a hand to another developer, after their success with the Shovel Knight series.

  • Monster taming and farming mix in Ova Magica is up on Kickstarter and already funded

    Ova Magica, a blending of casual farming in the spirit of Stardew Valley and Harvest Moon blended with monster taming and battling like something out of Pokemon is now live on Kickstarter. It managed to get fully funded within the first 2-3 hours, which I'm really not surprised about. The early tech demo was promising and it has such a great idea. Thankfully it's another that will support Linux too and the developer has been very clear about this. The Kickstarter campaign also lists it nice and clear as "The game will be released on PC DRM-Free, on Steam (Windows, Mac OS and Linux), Nintendo Switch, Playstation 4, Playstation 5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X/S.".

  • Plex Arcade is a retro video game streaming service that excludes Linux users

    Unfortunately, there is one big catch -- Linux users are being left out.