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Focus: Bibletime

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Software

BibleTime is a Bible study program. I have used a few of these under Windows, but found them mostly cumbersome. They were memory hogs and the interface was unappealing and clunky. The amount of available information was astounding however, but one program did not differ greatly from the other. They all used the vast resources that are available in the public domain. One thing was highly annoying: adding most of those resources to the program, one by one. I was curious how the open source program would do against that.

BibleTime is a KDE based program, so installing that one on a clean Ubuntu will definitely bring up some dependencies as well. When you start the program up for the first time you are given the opportunity to install the resource files. The list of languages, bibles and publications is impressive. Nothing new but impressive nonetheless. The Dutch are limited to the Statenvertaling only since all the other Bible translations are not in the public domain. Anyway, you can tick of all the books you like and BibleTime installs them from it’s own FTP server. There is a warning for those folks out there that live in countries where the possession of a Bible is illegal. From then on it is a matter of waiting untill your bookshelf is filled. Major improvement.

Full Story.

what? have you returned to god now?

Lmao, seriously, i'd rather read microsoft's windowsXP bible than God's! this post cracked me up!

Interesting review

Interesting perspective from someone who is not familiar with the Bible. For example the abbreviating of translation references to three letters, such at KJV and ASV caused him a problem. I would never have thought of this, but it is a good point. Not having a good Bible program on Linux is one of the last things that keeps me from junking XP on my Thinkpad. I use eSword, and I have heard a rumour that it can be run under wine.

re: Bible nonsense

the Article wrote:
The Dutch are limited to the Statenvertaling only since all the other Bible translations are not in the public domain.

Wow, I'm shocked! A religion and it's all about capitalism - go figure?

At least Santa Claus (another Mythical figure) just wants to you be good to gather his blessings (gifts) - not pony up some cold hard cash.

Apparently the Vatican (with assets over 10BN and Cash Surplus of several million) needs to squeeze the last few bucks out of the flock before the sheep start to wise up.

Plus, how often do you have to study the bible? It's neither a long or complex book - don't these people have the capacity to memorize anything?

If the choice is Bible Mythology or Ubuntu Fanboy Articles - lets go with the Fanboys.

BibleTime Writeup

A writeup of Linux Bible Study Software is not inappropriate on this web site, and many might be interested in reading such a review.

However, I don't like reading a web page with light green text on a black background--it gives the impression the author is a 14-year old who's watched the Matrix movies too many times.

re: BibleTime Writeup

gfranken wrote:

However, I don't like reading a web page with light green text on a black background--it gives the impression the author is a 14-year old who's watched the Matrix movies too many times.

Oh man, I hear ya. Those just kill my eyes! Literally, physical pain and then 15 minutes to get them to work again. Big Grin

re: Bibletime Writeup

As you can tell, I COMPLETELY disagree.

Tech is one thing, mythology is something completely different. If you want to discuss various flavors of mythology, I suggest you look to the various sites devoted to spreading delusions.

Porn has a big technology base, but I haven't seen alot of that reviewed here. Wicca (not wiki) has a handful of software for their astrology nonsense, but I haven't seen that reviewed here.

There's 40 or so major religions and 100's of sects or groups. Do we really need to explore discuss debunk those here?

re: Bibletime Writeup

The author wasn't discussing the merits of religion or stating his beliefs in one deity over another. He was reviewing a commonly used application found in several distros and installable on many more. It was an application review.

re: Bibletime Writeup

I have first dibs on a Linux porn review.

That aside, porn != religion.

re: Bibletime Writeup

There used to be an app called pornview or pornviewer. It was basically an image viewer like gqview or kuickshow, but I guess the developers thought it'd be funny to call it pornview. I haven't heard of it in a while, I guess it faded away.

Re: re: Bibletime Writeup

vonskippy:
The article is about open source software that runs under Linux. It's a single article, not like Tuxmachines is linking millions of such articles.

Analogizing Porn with Religious study strikes me as absurd.

I have no desire to get into a discussion here regarding varieties of religious belief or nonbelief. Your view on this is certainly known.

This is all I'll say regarding this discussion thread.

Focus: Gnomesword2

If you have a KDE-based program for Bible study, there is -no doubt- a Gnome counterpart for it as well. Indeed, next to BibleTime you have GnomeSword2. The default install of GnomeSword comes with the King James bible, Matthew Henry’s and Naves Dictionary.

The default screen has a five pane layout with the library to the left and then the Bible translation you use (top left) with the possibility for a standard view or parallel view, the commentary (top right), the dictionary (bottom right) and a preview pane (bottom left). The top two screens synchronize instantly and automatically. The interface is a lot cleaner than BibleTime’s, but that is no doubt due to the difference in interface philosophies.

Full Story.

(Eye alert: Beware the Matrix color scheme.)

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