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Secuity Leftovers

Filed under
Security

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (spip and webkit2gtk), Fedora (kernel and libexif), openSUSE (chromium and rclone), Slackware (mutt), SUSE (kernel, mariadb, and slurm), and Ubuntu (igraph).

  • Top Tips to Protect Your Linux System

    Linux-based operating systems have a reputation for their high-security level. That's one of the reasons why the market share for Linux has been growing. The most commonly used operating systems such as Windows are often affected by targeted attacks in the form of ransomware infections, spyware, as well as worms, and malware.

    As a result, many personal, as well as enterprise users, are turning to Linux-based operating systems such as the Ubuntu-based Linux OS for security purposes. While Linux based systems are not targeted as frequently as other popular operating systems, they are not completely foolproof. There are plenty of risks and vulnerabilities for all types of Linux devices which put your privacy as well as your identity at risk.

  • Building a healthy relationship between security and sysadmins | Enable Sysadmin

    Learn how to bridge the gap between operations/development and security.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Terminology 1.9 Terminal Emulator Works Better with Debian-Based Systems

If you’re a fan of terminal emulators, Terminology is one of the most appealing and functional out there. With version 1.9, the app received various under-the-hood improvements to work better with the Debian GNU/Linux operating system and any distribution based on it. Terminology 1.9 also introduces the `ability to search fonts in the fonts panel in case you’re not satisfied with the default one, as well as a bunch of new color schemes, including Belafonte Day, Belafonte Night, Cobalt2, Dracula, Fahrenheit, Material, One Dark, PaleNight, Soft Era, Tango Dark, Tango Light, and Tomorrow Night Burns. Read more

What is Login Shell in Linux?

The login shell is the first process that is executed with your user ID when you log into an interactive session. This may seem simple at the surface but if you dig deep, it could get confusing a bit. To understand, let's see revisit the login process in Linux systems. Linux is a multi-user system where multiple users can log in and use the system at the same time. The first process in a Linux system, be it init or systemd, starts a getty program. This getty, short for 'get tty' (tty denotes physical or virtual terminals), is responsible for protecting the system from unauthorized access. Read more

23 Best Open Source Text Editors (GUI + CLI) in 2021

Text editors can be used for writing code, editing text files such as configuration files, creating user instruction files, and many more. In Linux, text editors are of two kinds that is the graphical user interface (GUI) and command-line text editors (console or terminal). In this article, I am taking a look at some of the best 21 open-source commonly used text editors in Linux on both servers and desktops. Read more