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OSS used in fight for human rights

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OSS

Last year we ran a story on Martus (see story), an open source software tool used by human rights workers, attorneys, journalists and others who need to secure their information from eavesdropping, theft or equipment failure.

Named after the Greek word for witness, Martus is a secure information management tool that allows users to create a searchable and encrypted database and back this data up remotely to a choice of publicly available servers. The Martus software is used by organiations around the world to protect sensitive information and shield the identity of victims or witnesses who provide testimony on human rights abuses.

Analyzer

Sometimes used in conjunction with Martuse, Analyzer is used to capture and analyse data collected by human rights groups that contain details of human rights abuses from various sources, including medical records, newspaper articles, witness testimonies, letters, interviews, and official reports and documents.

Full Story.

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