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today's leftovers

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  • [ANNOUNCE] libX11 1.7.0
    Here's a summary of changes from README.md:
    
    libX11 version 1.7.0 includes a new API, hence the change from the 1.6
    series to 1.7:
    
     * XSetIOErrorExitHandler which provides a mechanism for applications
       to recover from I/O error conditions instead of being forced to
       exit. Thanks to Carlos Garnacho for this.
    
    This release includes a bunch of bug fixes, some which have been pending for over three years:
    
     * A bunch of nls cleanups to remove obsolete entries and clean up
       formatting of the ist. Thanks to Benno Schulenberg for these.
    
     * Warning fixes and other cleanups across a huge swath of the
       library. Thanks to Alan Coopersmith for these.
    
     * Memory allocation bugs, including leaks and use after free in the
       locale code. Thanks to Krzesimir Nowak, Jacek Caban and Vittorio
       Zecca for these.
    
     * Thread safety fixes in the locale code. Thanks to Jacek Caban for
       these.
    
     * poll_for_response race condition fix. Thanks to Frediano Ziglio for
       the bulk of this effort, and to Peter Hutterer for careful review
       and improvements.
    
    Version 1.7.0 includes a couple of new locales:
    
     * ia and ie locales. Thanks to Carmina16 for these.
    
    There are also numerous compose entries added, including:
    
     * |^ or ^| for ↑, |v or v| for ↓, ~~ for ≈. Thanks to Antti
        Savolainen for this.
    
     * Allowing use of 'v' for caron, in addition to 'c', so things like
       vC for Č, vc for č. Thanks to Benno Schulenberg for this.
    
     * Compose sequences LT, lt for '<', and GT, gt for '>' for keyboards
       where those are difficult to access. Thanks to Jonathan Belsewir
       for this.
    
    
  • X11 Library Sees Lots Of Fixes With libX11 1.7 Release

    It's been seven years since the release of libX11 1.6.0 for this central X11 library while on Friday was replaced by the libX11 1.7 series. The release is primarily made up of fixes but leading to the version bump is a new API that allows for applications to recover from I/O error conditions rather than being forced to exit.

    That API addition for libX11 1.7.0 is interesting with XSetIOErrorExitHandler. But besides that are many fixes that accumulated for quite a while. The fixes range from warning fixes to memory allocation bugs being addressed to thread safety issues being resolved. There are also new locales and other changes with libX11 1.7.0.

  • CY's Take on PWC#087 | Moments on Perl or other Programming Issues

    After the long-haul Sudoku Task, this week we come to meet two tiny tasks.

  • Extensions in Firefox 84 | Mozilla Add-ons Blog

    Here are our highlights of what’s coming up in the Firefox 84 release...

More in Tux Machines

Xfce Virtual Machine Images For Development

The openSUSE distributions offer a variety of graphical desktop environments, one of them being the popular and lightweight Xfce. Up to now there was the stable tested branch available in Tumbleweed already during install. Furthermore, for interested users the development OBS repository xfce:next offered a preview state of what’s coming up next to Tumbleweed. Xfce Development in openSUSE Thanks to the hard work of openSUSE’s Xfce team there is a third option: Xfce Development Repository aka RAT In a playful way, a rat is meant to represent the unpolished nature of this release: a rat is scruffy looking compared to a mouse (the cute and beloved mascot of Xfce). And the RAT repository provides packages automatically built right from the Git Master Branch of Xfce upstream development. The goal of this project is to test and preview the new software so that bugs can be spotted and fixed ahead of time by contributing upstream. The packages pull in source code state on a daily basis and offer a quite convenient way to test and eventually help development. So this is where the team builds and tests the latest and unstable releases of Xfce Desktop Environment for openSUSE. Read more

Radeon RX 6800 Series Performance Comes Out Even Faster With Newest Linux Code

Last week we delivered AMD Radeon RX 6800 / RX 6800 XT Linux benchmarks and the performance was great both for Linux gaming as well as the OpenCL compute performance. But for as good as those Big Navi numbers were on the open-source Linux graphics driver stack, they are now even better. That launch-day testing was based on the Linux state in the second-half of October when the cards arrived and initial (re-)testing began in preparing for the Radeon RX 6800 series reviews -- not only the Radeon RX 6800 series but re-testing all of the other AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards for the comparison too. Thanks to the rate of the open-source graphics driver progression and the newest code always being available, now just days after launch the numbers are even more compelling for Linux gamers with the slightly newer Linux 5.10 and Mesa Git compared to just weeks ago. In particular were the last minute NGG fixes and other Big Navi tweaks along with an important Radeon RX 6800 (non-XT) fix. There has also been other RADV improvements and more that accumulated in Mesa 21.0-devel this month. On the kernel side, Linux 5.10 is still at play. Both the old and newer Mesa snapshots were also on LLVM 11.0. Read more Also: Intel: AMD Gimps On Battery-Powered Laptop Performance - But DPTF On Linux Still Sucks - Phoronix

today's howtos

  • How to Install and Configure Hadoop on Ubuntu 20.04 – TecAdmin

    Hadoop is a free, open-source and Java-based software framework used for storage and processing of large datasets on clusters of machines. It uses HDFS to store its data and process these data using MapReduce. It is an ecosystem of Big Data tools that are primarily used for data mining and machine learning. Apache Hadoop 3.3 come with noticeable improvements any many bug fixes over the previous releases. It has four major components such as Hadoop Common, HDFS, YARN, and MapReduce.

  • How to create a Cloudwatch Event Rule in AWS

    A near-real-time stream of system events that describe changes in AWS resources is delivered by CloudWatch Events. We can create a rule that matches events and route them to one or more target functions. We can use CloudWatch Events to schedule automated actions. These actions can be self-triggered at certain times using cron or rate expressions. We can have EC2 instances, Lambda functions, Kinesis Data Streams, ECS tasks, Batch jobs, SNS topics, SQS queues, and a few more services as target endpoints for CloudWatch Events. To know more about Cloudwatch events, visit the official AWS documentation here.

  • How to use Bash file test operators in Linux

    File Test Operators are used in Linux to check and verify attributes of files like ownership or if they are a symlink. Every Test operator has a specific purpose. The most important operators are -e and -s. In this article, you will learn to test files using the if statement followed by some important test operators in Linux.

  • How To Install Wireguard on CentOS 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Wireguard on CentOS 8. For those of you who didn’t know, Wireguard is an open-source, dependable, advanced, VPN tunneling software you can install and use right now to create a secure, point-to-point connection to a server. It is cross-platform and can run almost anywhere, including Linux, Windows, Android, and macOS. Wireguard is a peer-to-peer VPN. it does not use the client-server model. Depending on its configuration, a peer can act as a traditional server or client. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of the Wireguard VPN on CentOS 8.

  • How To Install NVM on CentOS/RHEL 7 – TecAdmin

    NVM stands for Node Version Manager is a command-line utility for managing Node versions. Sometimes you required to deploy multiple node application with different-2 versions. Managing the multiple Node.js versions for differnt-2 projects are a pain for the developers. But NVM helped to easily manage multiple active Node.js versions on a single system. This tutorial will explain you to install NVM on CentOS/RHEL 7/6 systems and manage multiple Node.js versions.

  • How to install Kali Linux 2020.4 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Kali Linux 2020.4.

  • How to make your own personal VPN in under 30 minutes

    In the Distribution box, choose the newest available Ubuntu LTS release — as of the time of writing, that's 20.04 LTS. Below that, pick the region you want your VPN to be located in. It's possible to change the location later, but you'll have to contact Linode support. For the plan, select 'Nanode 1GB' from the list of Shared CPU options. VPNs don't need much processing power, so this low-spec option will work just fine.

  • Use nnn as a File Manager for Linux Terminal - Make Tech Easier

    If you have used the Linux terminal for an extended period of time, you probably know some of the useful commands, like cd to move into and out of folders, create new ones, and copy or move files. Still, you may prefer how desktop file managers are more user-friendly and quicker for some tasks. In that case, you’ll love nnn. nnn is the equivalent of a desktop file manager for the terminal. Although not an ultra-complex solution like Midnight Commander, nnn is light on resources, fast, and allows you to navigate your file system without having to type commands.

Android Leftovers