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EasyOS version 2.5 released

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GNU
Linux

EasyOS 2.5 is the latest in the 2.x Buster-series, built with Debian 10.6 DEBs. As well as the DEBs, other packages are updated, including SeaMonkey 2.53.5, and the Linux kernel is now 5.4.78. There have been many infrastructure and utility fixes and improvements, including hardware-profiling for the CPU temperature monitor. The single most significant application change relative to the previous release is the new BluePup bluetooth manager, replacing Blueman (though Blueman is in the repository, so can be installed if needed). The Multiple Sound Card Wizard has been integrated with BluePup.

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Release notes: Easy Buster version 2.5

EasyOS 2.5 Linux Distro Released With A New Game

  • EasyOS 2.5 Linux Distro Released With A New Game, Bluetooth Manager

    After the release of EasyOS 2.4 months ago, its creator Barry Kauler has now announced a new point version 2.5 of the current EasyOS 2.0 “buster” series.

    As the latest EasyOS 2.5 is built on top of the Debian GNU/Linux 10.6, it includes the long-term Linux kernel 5.4.78 and other updated Debian packages like SeaMonkey 2.53.5.

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