Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

PinePhone KDE Community Edition Launches with Plasma Mobile UI, Convergence

Filed under
KDE

After PinePhone UBports Community Edition, PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition, and PinePhone Manjaro Community Edition, here comes the PinePhone KDE Community Edition using the Plasma Mobile UI developed by the KDE Project.

If you love the KDE Plasma desktop environment, you'll adore the Plasma Mobile-powered PinePhone Linux phone, which promises to offer you the same underlying technologies `and apps that you're already using on your personal computer.

Read more

PinePhone KDE Community Edition up for preorder in December

  • PinePhone KDE Community Edition up for preorder in December

    The PinePhone is an inexpensive smartphone capable of running a variety of different Linux-based operating systems. But the folks at Pine64 have been partnering with developers to ship a series of Community Edition phones with a specific OS pre-installed, and a custom logo on the back of the phone.

    Pine64 had previously offered PinePhone UBports (Ubuntu Touch) and postmarketOS Community Edition phones, and the company is currently shipping PinePhone Manjaro Community Edition phones to customers.

    Up next? The PinePhone KDE Community Edition.

    [...]

    The convergence dock is a USB-C hub that allows you to connect a display, ethernet cable, and usb accessories to the PinePhone and use it like a desktop computer.

Welcome to this month’s community update!

  • November Update: KDE PinePhone CE And A Peek Into The Future

    Welcome to this month’s community update! We’ve got exciting news to share, but before I proceed in doing so I’d like to thank Gamiee, JF, and PizzaLovingNerd for contributing to this blog entry and Clover for the final edits and proof-reading. As the PINE64 device-family grows larger and becomes more diverse, I find myself more reliant than ever on other people’s insight and expertise when writing up these updates. To this end, I’d very much like to thank the aforementioned community members and, at the same time, invite others to take part in shaping future updates. If you’ve got something you would like to contribute to an upcoming community update, then please reach out to me in the chats.

    In this update we’re happy to announce the next Community Edition of the PinePhone, which will ship with KDE Plasma Mobile. We will also take a look at the Pinebook Pro dock and talk a bit about future hardware.

    For those of you who are averse to reading long blog entries or simply prefer receiving news in an audio-video format, then you’ll be glad to know that we now have a complimentary video edition of the monthly community update. It can also be watched on LBRY if Youtube isn’t your thing.

Experience the future of KDE’s open mobile platform

  • Experience the future of KDE’s open mobile platform

    KDE and Pine64 are announcing today the imminent availability of the new PinePhone - KDE Community edition. This Pine64 PinePhone gives you a taste of where free mobile devices and software platforms are headed.

    The PinePhone - KDE Community edition includes most of the essential features a smartphone user would expect and its functionalities increase day by day. You can follow the progress of the development of apps and features in the Plasma Mobile blog.

    Plasma Mobile is a direct descendant from KDE’s successful Plasma desktop. The same underlying technologies drive both environments and apps like KDE Connect that lets you connect phones and desktops, the Okular document reader, the VVave music player, and others, are available on both desktop and mobile.

    Thanks to projects like Kirigami and Maui, developers can write apps that, not only run in multiple environments but that also gracefully adapt by growing into landscape format when displayed on workstation screen and shrinking to portrait mode on phones. Developers are rapidly populating Plasma Mobile with essential programs, such as web browsers, clocks, calendars, weather apps and games, all of which are being deployed on all platforms, regardless of the layout.

Next Linux PinePhone Community Edition Will Feature KDE Plasma

  • Next Linux PinePhone Community Edition Will Feature KDE Plasma Mobile

    If you’re thinking to buy current available PinePhone Manjaro Community Edition, you may need to rethink as PINE64 has now teamed up with KDE community to launch a new PinePhone KDE Community Edition.

    After PinePhone Ubports, postmarketOS, and Manjaro Community Edition (CE), it’s fourth CE of Linux-based PinePhone smartphone, which will now feature free and open source KDE Plasma Mobile User Interface.

    This new PinePhone CE with Plasma Mobile will be available to preorder starting on December 1, 2020.

Missing the Point, PinePhone KDE Community Edition

  • Missing the Point, PinePhone KDE Community Edition

    Many people , when digging into the PinePhone’s specs, complain about the low storage, the weak CPU, the lacklustre peripherals…

    Naturally, they are missing the point. This is not a phone that you would buy to substitute the supercomputer/surveillance device you already carry around in your pocket. Yes, the memory is small; the pics from the camera are a bit grainy; the battery is decent, but doesn’t last all that long. All this is true.

PinePhone KDE Linux phone is getting ready for pre-orders

  • PinePhone KDE Linux phone is getting ready for pre-orders

    For all the endless stories about the latest Apple iPhone and what's really the best Android smartphone, you'd think there's already a phone for everyone. Nope. Wrong. For those who value privacy first and foremost, there's the Google-free, pro-privacy Android /e/ operating system, and then there are those who still want an honest-to-goodness Linux-based smartphone. For the latter, there's a new choice from leading Linux smartphone vendor Pine64: The new PinePhone - KDE Community edition.

Hacker adds a working fingerprint sensor to the PinePhone

  • Hacker adds a working fingerprint sensor to the PinePhone

    The PinePhone isn’t just the most affordable smartphone designed to run GNU/Linux-based operating systems. It’s also designed to be a modular device – most internal components are user replaceable, and there are six pogo pins that allow extra hardware to be added to the device.

    So far Pine64 has announced plans for three optional accessories that use those pins. Swap out the back cover of the phone and you’ll eventually be able to add NFC, wireless charging, or a physical keyboard.

    But independent hardware hackers have come up with several other solutions. The latest? A functional fingerprint reader.

PinePhone KDE Community Edition will run Plasma Mobile...

  • PinePhone KDE Community Edition will run Plasma Mobile out-of-the-box

    Pine64, makers of PinePhone, the Linux powered, completely open mobile device, has joined forces with software community KDE for a special edition. The PinePhone KDE Community Edition will run Plasma Mobile, the mobile version of KDE’s Plasma graphical workspace environment. KDE says that Plasma Mobile “includes most of the essential features a smartphone user would expect and its functionalities increase day by day.”

    Plasma Mobile has been designed to allow developers to write for Plasma Desktop and Mobile simultaneously, with the mobile OS taking care of formatting, even where the phone screen is connected to a monitor in other words. All apps for Plasma work on all form factors, meaning that it’s easy to hook your PinePhone up to a keyboard, mouse, and monitor and use it as a workstation, similar to Ubuntu Touch and Samsung DeX. Users of the desktop OS will also be able to link their PinePhone KDE-CE to their desktop. There is a 2GB and 3GB variant, with the latter bundling in a hub offering with two USB, video, and ethernet ports.

PinePhone – KDE Community Edition Now Available

  • PinePhone – KDE Community Edition Now Available

    KDE and Pine64 have announced the availability of the new PinePhone – KDE Community edition. The idea of having mobile devices that can display a full workstation desktop when connected to a monitor, keyboard and mouse, has been around for years and both the KDE Community and Pine64 have been working to make it a reality.

    The PinePhone – KDE Community edition runs neither Android nor iOS, but instead an entirely free and open source system: KDE Community’s Plasma Mobile.

    Plasma Mobile is a direct derivation from KDE’s Plasma desktop and offers total privacy, user control and the promise of convergent environment and applications.

PinePhone—KDE Community Edition Available for Pre-Order...

  • PinePhone—KDE Community Edition Available for Pre-Order in December

    KDE and Pine64 have announced imminent availability of the new PinePhone—KDE Community edition, which they say provides “a taste of where free mobile devices and software platforms are headed.”

    According to Pine64 website, the Allwinner A64 SoC is the brains of the PinePhone, which runs mainline Linux, uses mainline Arm Trusted Firmware (ATF), and u-boot, and includes open source drivers for all main SoC components.

KDE teams up with PinePhone for the PinePhone - KDE Community

  • KDE teams up with PinePhone for the PinePhone - KDE Community edition

    Your daily dose of not-linux-gaming news, with an announcement for fans of Linux gadgets and tech as KDE has teamed up with Pine64 to bring out a PinePhone - KDE Community edition.

    Sounds like it's going to be quite a nice device for enthusiasts, especially if you're after a proper Linux phone that isn't Android and will respect your privacy - something I've tried to become more conscious of myself over the last few years. For extra privacy and security, and something I wish more phones had, there's hardware kill-switches for the modem, WiFi/Bluetooth, microphone and cameras.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

Explore binaries using this full-featured Linux tool

In 10 ways to analyze binary files on Linux, I explained how to use Linux's rich set of native tools to analyze binaries. But if you want to explore your binary further, you need a tool that is custom-made for binary analysis. If you are new to binary analysis and have mostly worked with scripting languages, 9 essential GNU binutils tools will help you get started learning the compilation process and what constitutes a binary. It's natural to ask why you need yet another tool if existing Linux-native tools do similar things. Well, it's for the same reasons you use your cellphone as your alarm clock, to take notes, as a camera, to listen to music, to surf the internet, and occasionally to make and receive calls. Previously, separate devices and tools handled these functions — like a physical camera for taking pictures, a small notepad for taking notes, a bedside alarm clock to wake up, and so on. Having one device to do multiple (but related) things is convenient for the user. Also, the killer feature is interoperability between the separate functions. Read more

7 ways open source was essential to business in 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic created many new challenges for businesses in 2020 as they rapidly moved non-essential workers to remote operations. However, it also created tremendous opportunities for innovation as people searched for effective ways to work and collaborate virtually. Opensource.com responded to the need by publishing a variety of articles in 2020 on working better with open source. Since it appears working remotely is here to stay for the foreseeable future, make sure you're doing everything you can to adapt by reading the top seven articles about open source business from 2020. Read more