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Chaintech Launches First 7800GTX Card

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Hardware

Wow, Chaintech was quick off the mark today, announcing its own version of nVidia’s next generation GeForce 7800GTX GPU.

Released today by Chaintech (that's Today people!), the AE78GTX will fly straight to the top of the performance graphics card market. It features a 256bit memory interface, 256MB of DDR3 SDRAM providing a whopping 38.4GB per second memory bandwidth, a 430MHz engine clock and 1200MHz memory clock. This currently bitch slaps everything else on the market and, what’s more, the AE78GTX is SLI ready.

Delving deeper, Chaintech informs us that the heavyweight card possesses the CineFX 4.0 engine and second generation UltraShadow II technology to enhance the performance of cutting edge games that feature complex scenes and multiple light sources. The new generation Intellisample 4.0 anti-alias technology will full support for DirectX 9.0c (Shader Model 3.0) gets a run out too, meaning faster, smoother and (to use the company’s own phrase) “crystal-clear” 3D images.

The back of the card is almost as good as the inside with HDTV out and Dual DVI-I out with the nVidia PureVideo technology. Think top end home theatre in high def.

As for the software bundles, you’ll get WinDVD5 (6 Channel), WinDVD Creator 2, WinRip 2.1, Home Theatre 2.1 Lite, Adobe Photoshop Album 1.0 and a 5-in-1 game pack, plus a full version of Painkiller.

Now, of course, we can’t speak definitively on the performance of the GeForce 7800GTX GPU before we have one in the labs, or can we… (wink, wink, nudge, nudge), but the single card should be scoring around 7,600 to 7,800 in 3DMark 2005. SLI benchmarking can drop you anywhere between 11,000 and 13,000 depending on the supporting PC configuration.

Sadly, we’re still waiting on UK pricing (or any pricing for that matter), but I would suggest you take a deep breath and sit in a comfortable chair for when it arrives. Now call us greedy, but we can’t wait for the Ultra version…

Source.

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