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Steps to manually mount a USB flash drive in GNU/Linux

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I recently got hold of a 1 GB USB memory stick. But when I tried to mount it in a bare bones Linux distribution (a distribution which has just enough software as is needed), it was not mounted automatically. This is because the auto mounting takes place by means of a program known as hotplug which detects the USB device that is inserted in real time and then mounts it in the desired location.

So is it possible to mount a USB device (in my case the USB stick) manually ? Yes, it is possible. The idea is that the USB ports are detected by GNU/Linux as /dev/sdax - where 'x' in sdax stands for the number of the USB port. And once the USB device is connected to the USB port of your machine, you have to mount it manually.

These are the steps I followed to successfully mount the USB memory stick on my bare bones Debian Etch machine.

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