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Gentoo's Proposed Code of Conduct Adopted

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Gentoo

In no small part due to the wide exposure of a high-profile article published earlier in the week on in-fighting and other disgraceful behaviors from developers and contributors, Gentoo announced a proposed Code of Conduct. Today, a vote on the proposed Gentoo Code of Conduct passed with votes tallying 6 to 1.


Some of the guidelines include:

Acceptable behaviour

Be courteous. Though respect is earned, it must start somewhere. Respect someones right for their own opinion and acknowledge that they do deserve a measure of politeness in your response.

Give accurate information in the spirit of being helpful.

Respectfully disagree with or challenge other members. The operative word here is respectfully.

Using the correct forum for your post. Bug reports and idle chatter do not belong on the gentoo-dev mailing list; discussion about a wide-ranging change to the tree probably does not belong on Bugzilla. Different fora will also have different standards of behaviour -- a joke that is perfectly acceptable on IRC will be taken differently when made on a mailing list.

Admit the possibility of fault and respect different point of views. No one is perfect -- you will get things wrong occasionally. Don't be afraid to admit this. Similarly, while something may seem perfectly obvious to you, others may see it differently.

If you screw up, take responsibility for your actions.

Unacceptable behaviour

Flaming and trolling. What is trolling? You are deemed to be trolling if you make comments intended to provoke an angry response from others. What is flaming? Flaming is the act of sending or posting messages that are deliberately hostile and insulting.

Posting/participating only to incite drama or negativity rather than to tactfully share information.

Being judgmental, mean-spirited or insulting. It is possible to respectfully challenge someone in a way that empowers without being judgemental.

Constantly purveying misinformation despite repeated warnings.


Disciplinary action can be imposed and will be up to the discretion of an official charged with the duty of maintaining good order. Breaches of the Code of Conduct guidelines can be reported to the proctors.

Full Document here

re: Gentoo

Isn't it fun watching a bunch of little children acting like grownups?

The only thing that "document" left out was "double dog dare you" rules and whose mother was going to take everyone home if they continued to misbehave.

How sad that a once bleeding edge distro falls into such disarray and childish behavior.

Business geeks the world over must look at projects like this and just laugh their collective asses off. Perhaps one of them will be kind enough to loan these guys a copy of "Business Management for Dummies" book.

re: Gentoo

Not really on topic to what you said, but I got to say how much better things are running with site under debian. Just one example, used to in gentoo when the nightly backups/crons would run, my site would just almost stop. Tar and cp would use up a good deal of the resources. I had them set up to run at nice 19, but still it was miserable. When the backups run now under debian, it doesn't even breath hard. In fact, the whole of memory management is handled much better in debian. Sure I was still using a 2.4 kernel on the server under gentoo, but copying large files under 2.6 on my desktop will make other things practically unusable until it's done. A few folks have told me that site seems to be faster now. I don't know what's up exactly, but I'm really glad I made the switch.

re: Gentoo

I guess it's not just me then. It's not perfect, but the pages are loading a -lot- better than they used to. Before, sometimes I would give up because it loaded so slow (no offense!) but now it's far easier to navigate. I am surprised it make such a big difference. Good to note.

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