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Programming Leftovers

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Development

  • Graphics in Qt 6.0: QRhi, Qt Quick, Qt Quick 3D

    Last year we had a three part blog series about Qt's new approach to working with 3D graphics APIs and shading languages: part 1, part 2, part 3. For Qt Quick, an early, opt-in preview of the new rendering architecture was shipped in Qt 5.14, with some improvements in Qt 5.15. With the release of Qt 6.0 upcoming, let's see what has happened since Qt 5.15. It will not be possible to cover every detail of the graphics stack improvements for Qt Quick here, let alone dive into the vast amount of Qt Quick 3D features, many of which are new or improved in Qt 6.0. Rather, the aim is just to give an overview of what can be expected from the graphics stack perspective when Qt 6.0 ships later this year.

  • Multi-Layer Perceptron & Backpropagation - Implemented from scratch

    Writing a custom implementation of a popular algorithm can be compared to playing a musical standard. For as long as the code reflects upon the equations, the functionality remains unchanged. It is, indeed, just like playing from notes. However, it lets you master your tools and practice your ability to hear and think.

    In this post, we are going to re-play the classic Multi-Layer Perceptron. Most importantly, we will play the solo called backpropagation, which is, indeed, one of the machine-learning standards.

    As usual, we are going to show how the math translates into code. In other words, we will take the notes (equations) and play them using bare-bone numpy.

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  • PyDev of the Week: William Horton

    This week we welcome William Horton (@hortonhearsafoo) as our PyDev of the Week! William is a Backend Engineer at Compass and has spoken at several local Python conferences. He is a contributor to PyTorch and fastai.

    Let’s spend some time getting to know William better!

    Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

    A little about myself: people might be surprised about my educational background–I didn’t study computer science. I have a bachelors in the social sciences. So by the time I finished undergrad, the most programming I had done was probably doing regressions in Stata to finish my thesis. I decided against grad school, and instead signed up for a coding bootcamp (App Academy) in NYC. The day I’m writing this, September 28, is actually 5 years to the day that I started at App Academy.

    Since then I’ve worked at a few different startups in NYC, across various industries: first investment banking, then online pharmacy, and now real estate. I’m currently a senior engineer on the AI Services team at Compass, working on machine learning solutions for our real estate agents and consumers.

    I like to spend my free time on a few different hobbies. I’m a competitive powerlifter, so I like to get into the gym a few times a week (although with the pandemic in NYC I didn’t lift for six months or so). I’ve actually found powerlifting to be a pretty common hobby among software engineers. Every time someone new joined my gym, it seemed like they came from a different startup. I love to play basketball. And I’m passionate about music: I’ve been a singer almost my whole life, and most recently was performing with an a cappella group in NYC. And in the last year I’ve picked up the guitar, after not touching it since I was a teenager, and that has been very fulfilling.

  • Malayalam fonts: Beyond Latin font metrics | Soliloquies

    This year’s annual international conference organized by TeX Users Group — TUG2020 — was held completely online due to the raging pandemic. In TUG2020, I have presented a talk on some important Malayalam typeface design factors and considerations.

    The idea and its articulation of the talk originated with K.H. Hussain, designer of well-known fonts such as Rachana, Meera, Meera Inimai, TNJoy etc. In a number of discussions that ensued, this idea was developed and later presented at TUG2020.

    Opening keynote to TUG2020 was delivered by Steve Matteson, about the design of Noto fonts. He mentioned that Noto was originally envisaged to be developed as a single font containing all Unicode scripts; but that was changed due to a couple of reasons: (1) huge size of resulting font and (2) the design of many South/South-East Asian characters do not fit well within its Latin font metrics.

  • Jérôme Gardou hired full-time to work on the memory manager

    I proudly announce that ReactOS Deutschland e.V. has hired Jérôme Gardou to work full-time on the ReactOS kernel’s memory manager for the next 3 months.

    Jérôme is a ReactOS veteran who has been contributing to the project since 2009. He has deep expertise into nearly all parts of ReactOS, ranging from various user-mode components (mostly related to low-level graphics) over their kernel-mode counterparts and down to bare-metal components like the kernel memory manager.

    During the upcoming months, Jérôme is going to overhaul the Mm (Memory Manager) and Cc (Cache Controller) components of the kernel. Both of them are core parts of the operating system, which are involved in every memory request and file operation. Improving them is expected to have a substantial effect on the overall stability and performance of ReactOS.

  • "Open-Source Windows" ReactOS To See Improved Memory Management - Phoronix

    ReactOS Deutschland e.V. has hired one of their long-time contributors to work full-time on the "open-source Windows" implementation's memory management for the next quarter.

    ReactOS is funding longtime contributor Jérôme Gardou to work full-time for the next three months on the open-source operating system's memory manager and cache controller code within its kernel.

    ReactOS hopes this overhaul to the MM/CS code will yield "a substantial effect on the overall stability and performance of ReactOS."

More in Tux Machines

Games: Aerofly FS 2 Flight Simulator, Amnesia: Rebirth, Vintage Story

  • Aerofly FS 2 Flight Simulator from IPACS is now available on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    Need to take to the skies? We can possibly help with that. Aerofly FS 2 Flight Simulator from IPACS recently quitely released a Linux version. They don't seem to have announced it in a news post but it's up and live on Steam right now. A reader emailed in about this, and the developer has confirmed it on their Steam forum. Looks like quite a detailed flight sim too with a number of aircraft included like the A320, B737-500, F-15, F-18, Aermacchi MB-339, King Air C90 GTx, Learjet 45, ASG 29 and Swift S1 gliders and more. After being released in Early Access in 2016, then a full release in 2017 it's continued being supported for a long time now. Most recently, it had a big update adding in the EC135 helicopter along with a bunch of optimizations to the game.

  • Amnesia: Rebirth is easily one of the scariest and best games of 2020

    After a rough launch, Frictional Games have nicely fixed up Amnesia: Rebirth and overall the experience is one we're not going to forget any time soon. "In Amnesia: Rebirth, you are Tasi Trianon, waking up deep in the desert of Algeria. Days have passed. Where have you been? What did you do? Where are the others? Retrace your journey, pull together the fragments of your shattered past; it is your only chance to survive the pitiless horror that threatens to devour you." While our livestreamer did a full playthrough live on our Twitch Channel cheered on by viewers which you can watch through on-demand on our YouTube Channel, I was spending it entirely alone in a dark room with no one but myself to count on. Not the best idea, because I am a complete wimp. I'm at least honest about that though and Amnesia: Rebirth was, in a word, terrifying. Okay, not all the way through, but plenty of it was. Amnesia: Rebirth might be Frictional's weirdest yet too. All of their games are strange in their own way but it feels like they really went hard on the darkness in Amnesia: Rebirth. It worked well though, not many games have made me terrified to look at a tiny window on a door before while I search a room for anything useful to keep me going that little bit longer.

  • Deep survival game Vintage Story has my full attention with the latest expansion

    Vintage Story has a huge new version almost ready to release, with a couple of Release Candidates going up for the 1.14 release and it's looking awesome. This is the survival game for those of you who love the blocky style of Minecraft but want something deeper, something much more complex and exciting. With full Linux support, Vintage Story is a good choice and the developer is definitely dedicated to their idea. With the 1.14 update pulling in lots of often requested features including character customization, the "Steel Age" along with assorted items to build like a metal door and a mechanical powered Pulverizer building that can grind down things for you which looks awesome. Your body temperature now matters more too with clothing giving warmth, frost damage during harsh winters, lots of new blocks, new graphics with shader effects and lots more.

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

Top 7 Linux GPU Monitoring and Diagnostic Commands Line Tools

A video card is a special circuit board that controls what is displayed on a computer monitor. It is also called a graphics processing unit (GPU), which calculates 3D images and graphics for Linux gaming and other usages. Let us see the top 7 Linux GPU monitoring and diagnostic command-line tools to solve issues. The following tools work on Linux for GPU monitoring and diagnostic purposes and other operating systems such as FreeBSD. The majority of Linux and FreeBSD users these days use Nvidia, Intel, and AMD GPUs. Read more