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Testimonial Ubuntu Blogs

It's not Ubuntu per se...

It's not Ubuntu per se that bothers me. If someone uses it and discovers Linux, than great. I do wonder how many of these stories we need to hear though... it's become so commonplace.

The only articles that bug me are, "How to do this on Ubuntu" when the instructions would apply to -any- distro out there. It's just annoying... that's all. How would stories like this go over?

"How-To Lay a Floor Mat In a Toyota"
"How-To Pour a Cup of Pepsi"
"How-To Type Words In KWrite"

Wink

Testify!

If you're like me, you may get tired of all the bad news on the internet all the time. War, disease, Windows... It's refreshing to hear about how someone tried something new and got it to work. "Aww... look, he reclaimed an old laptop for his mom and now he doesn't need to worry about viruses and spyware. How sweet." They may have been scared, they may have been angry. But to hear about how their Ubuntu, or any distro, install turned out great in the end makes my day. It's kinda like stories about puppies getting rescued by kittens dressed in little firefighter uniforms. It may be fluff, but it tends to put a smile on your face. So vote for testimonials! You wouldn't want to let the puppies down, would you?

re: Testify!

I kinda agree with ya. It's nice to hear the excitement in their voices - it reminds me of how I felt. Some of us old timers forget the weight-off-our-shoulders feeling we get when we first shake the M$ monkey.

But "waste of time" isn't a run-away winner. So, I'll have to compromise on this topic. I figure a good compromise would be to limit the testimonials to those with a bit of substance and a modicum of writing ability. I think the one that sent vonskippy over the edge was pretty bad. The poor guy didn't even know what a paragraph was. ...or capitalization. ...or punctuation. Big Grin

current poll

Good Poll.

Too bad people aren't adding a comment to their vote. It'd be interesting to see why people actually like them (I think it's obvious why people hate them).

I wonder if these "I like'em" people understand what "Testimonial" means?

We not talking about useful howto's (Ubuntu specific or general Linux) but just the monotonous blathering of people who think they're the first people to find Jesus Linux thru Ubuntu and write about how completely awesome it is and how it cures aids or cancer or warts or something.

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