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SUSE/OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, OBS and MicroOS

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/43 – Dominique a.k.a. DimStar (Dim*)

    During this week, we have only released 3 snapshots (1019, 1021, and 1022). a bunch of snapshots has been tested and discarded due to some bugs we, and surely either you, did not want to see on your machines. But as usual; lesser snapshots do not mean less change, as things just cumulate until we feel confident to send a snapshot out again.

  • Introducing the Open Build Service Connector [Ed: SUSE sucking up to Microsoft's openwashed proprietary software as usual]

    That’s right. The Open Build Service Connector is built around bookmarks of packages and projects. Bookmarks can be used to browse a project, its packages and its files. Additionally, you can view the configured repositories and adjust project paths and architectures.

    Individual packages or whole projects can be checked out directly from within Visual Studio Code to the file system similarly as one would do via osc. OBS’ version control is seamlessly integrated into Visual Studio Code’s Source Control module and can be used in a comparable fashion to the git extension.

  • Richard Brown: MicroOS Desktop, The Road to Daily Driving - LinuxReviews

    openSUSE Chairman and MicroOS Release Engineer Richard Brown presented OpenSUSE's minimal MicroOS Linux distribution as a potential desktop operating system at the openSUSE+LibreOffice Virtual Conference 2020 last week in a half an hour long presentation. MicroOS is a minimal Linux distribution primarily made for cloud services, IoT devices, containers and those types of use-cases. It could potentially also be used as a light desktop system similar to ChromeOS and an alpha version of MicroOS for Desktop is available. There are some problems to be solved on the road to a stable release as Richard Brown explains.

Node.js, OpenSSL, Mesa Update in Tumbleweed

  • Node.js, OpenSSL, Mesa Update in Tumbleweed

    Some of the package updates in the snapshots include newer versions of Node.js, OpenSSL, Mesa, Apparmor, ImageMagick and AutoYaST.

    The latest snapshot, 20201021, is trending stable at a 98 rating on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. This snapshot updated Mozilla Thunderbird to version 78.3.3 and improved support for encrypting with subkeys with OpenPGP. The new email client version also added support for wayland mode/autodetection in a startup wrapper. The security kernel module Apparmor added missing permissions to several profiles and abstractions. The 5.9 version of ethtool arrived in the snapshot and improved compatibility between system call ioctl and netlink output. The Linux Kernel updated to 5.8.15 and fixed a close proximity Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure, CVE-2020-12352, that could allow a remote attacker in adjacent range to use the flaw to leak small portions of stack memory by sending specially crafted Bluetooth AMP Packets. Node.js 14.14.0 had some bug fixes and a few changes like the behaviour of a new fs.rm method that follows the UNIX rm command. The update of the ruby2.7 package to 2.7.2 turned off deprecation warnings by default.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development Leftovers

  • Property bindings in Qt 6

    Qt 6 is coming with many new features under the hood. One of the most exciting features that we have added is to bring the concept of bindings from QML and Qt Quick back into the heart of Qt and allow using it from C++.

  • 8 Git aliases that make me more efficient | Opensource.com

    The excellent article 7 Git tricks that changed my life inspired me to write about another Git feature that's had a major impact on my experience using Git on the command line: aliases.

  • Daniel Stenberg: I am an 80 column purist

    I write and prefer code that fits within 80 columns in curl and other projects – and there are reasons for it. I’m a little bored by the people who respond and say that they have 400 inch monitors already and they can use them. I too have multiple large high resolution screens – but writing wide code is still a bad idea! So I decided I’ll write down my reasoning once and for all!

  • Post Json API using curl | RNM

    I developed a restful as communication for our software and client. We let end point of our API to talk each other and i quite simple for small test using Postman or SOAP-UI but to test with massive data via API is quite headache. Lucky enough, I am good with unit test so since our system develop using java, then I use Junit as helper to help me do the automation test. It look nice but somehow I still have issue to remote test using Junit on my Eclipse IDE. It all because the remote server we connnecting is on customer premise and the connection are so bad!

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 088 | Samir Parikh

    Despite the holiday week here in the U.S., I was able to tackle this week's Perl Weekly Challenge. I have to say that this week's challenge was the most satisfying for me as it allowed me to not only come up with a novel solution (for me!), but it also provided an opportunity for me to leverage two areas of Perl programming that have been a real challenge for me: recursion and references. The deadline to submit solutions for this challenge is fast approaching so if you haven't solved it yourself yet, you may want to come back to this post later.

  • CY's Take on PWC#088

    The above, I designed, is a prototype for multiplication (and division, if possible) when it is expensive to do mulitplication, such as matrices. Since I don't know much about those algorithmic knowledge, just leave the codes here for personal future digestion.

  • It’s that time of the year – Raku Advent Calendar

    When we start all over again with advent calendars, publishing one article a day until Christmas. This is going to be the first full year with Raku being called Raku, and the second year we have moved to this new site. However, it’s going to be the 10th year in a row with a Perl 6 or Raku calendar, previously published in the Perl 6 Advent Calendar blog. And also the 5th year since the Christmas release, which was announced in the advent calendar of that year.

  • Journal five minutes a day with Jupyter | Opensource.com

    Some people follow the tradition of creating New Year's resolutions. A year is a long time, though, so I plan with a seasonal theme or trajectory. Each quarter, I sit down and look at the upcoming three-month season and decide what I'll work on during that time. For my latest theme, I decided I wanted to write a daily journal. I like having clear commitments, so I committed to writing for five minutes each day. I also like having observable commitments, even if it is just for me, so I put my entries in Git. I decided I wanted some automation around my journaling and turned to my favorite automation tool: Jupyter. One of Jupyter's interesting features is ipywidgets, a set of interactive HTML widgets for Jupyter Notebooks, JupyterLab, and the IPython kernel. If you want to follow along with the code in this article, note that making your Jupyter lab instance support widgets can be a bit frustrating. Follow these instructions to set things up.

  • Doxyqml 0.5.1 release

    I’m happy to announce the release of Doxyqml 0.5.1. Doxyqml is a python program allowing to document QML APIs with the help of Doxygen. This version includes a single commit contributed by Olaf Mandel adding supports for recent versions of Doxygen (> 1.8.20).

  • Java 8 streams, functions and reductions

    There is a relatively simple challenge to extend the vowels in a string. Here is a way to do it in Java 8...

Android Leftovers

Devices/Embedded: MiTAC, Raspberry Pi and ESP32/Arduino

  • Fanless Linux embedded system makes a compact IoT gateway

    ICP Germany has recently introduced the MiTAC ME1-8MD series family of compact, fanless Linux embedded systems powered by NXP i.MX 8M processor and designed to be used as IoT gateways, data acquisition and processing systems, and mini servers. Three models have been launched with a choice of dual or quad-core processors, up to 4GB LPDDR4 RAM, and 32GB eMMC flash storage. The embedded computers also come with up to two Ethernet ports, support up to two displays, and include an internal Raspberry Pi compatible 40 pin GPIO header.

  • Official Raspberry Pi 4 case fan adds cooling to Raspberry Pi 4 case

    When the Raspberry Pi Foundation first introduced the Raspberry Pi 4, they claimed the board would work just fine under most cases without a heatsink, and the latter was only really needed under load. That may have been true when using the board in a temperate climate like in the United Kingdom, but then Raspberry Pi 4 met Thailand with some benchmarks results lower than on a Raspberry Pi 3. People using plastic enclosures had even more troubles. It’s only when I installed a heatsink on Raspberry Pi 4 that the board could really shine. The company also provided some firmware optimizations later on to further cool-down the board. But you can only do much with software, and many third-party cooling solutions such as fansinks or metal cases have been introduced for the popular SBC.

  • Pi-oT 2 IoT module adds 24V digital inputs, RS-485, and UPS to Raspberry Pi (Crowdfunding)

    Pi-oT was launched last year as a Raspberry Pi add-ons designed for commercial and industrial IoT automation. It features 5V I/Os, relays, and ADC inputs suitable for light-duty projects and prototyping. The company, called Edge Devices, has now launched an update with Pi-oT 2 adding optional support for 24V digital inputs, RS-485, and an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).

  • M5Paper ESP32 IoT development kit features a 4.7-inch e-Ink touchscreen display

    M5Stack has just launched its unique and latest core device with a touchscreen e-Ink display. M5Paper ESP32 IoT Development Kit is a fully programmable microcontroller-based platform that can be an ideal choice for your IoT applications. This low-power device could suit such purposes as an industrial controller or smart weather display.

today's howtos

  • Enable Timestamp For History Command In Fish Shell - OSTechNix

    Whenever a command is entered in the terminal, it will be saved at the end of the history file in Linux. You can easily retrieve these commands at any time using history command. The shell is also tracking the timestamp of all command entries, so that we can easily find when a specific command is executed. We already have shown you how to enable timestamp in Bash and Zsh shells. Today we will see how to enable timestamp for history command in Fish shell in Linux. In addition, we will also learn how to create a simple function to show the date and time stamps in history command output in fish shell.

  • Linux: How To Encrypt And Decrypt Files With A Password
  • How to convert pdf to image on Linux command line - nixCraft

    I have many PDF files, and I need to convert them to a png file format, add a border to those images, and convert back all those images to pdf format. How can I convert pdf to image format on Linux and vice versa using the CLI?

  • How To Install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a popular server scripting language known for creating dynamic and interactive Web pages. PHP is a widely-used programming language on the Web. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Restrict WordPress Site Access - Anto Online

    A lot of the time, you need to restrict access to various users on your website. Whether you’re cordoning premium content, sensitive pages, or content targeted to specific individuals, there are various ways you can restrict user access easily and effectively on your WordPress website. The easiest method is using plugins that you can just download and link with your website. If you have coding skills, you can also edit various functions to achieve the same thing. We shall also take a look at how you can restrict site managers with various levels of access. Whatever kind of site restrictions you need to accomplish, stick with us and we will help you do it.