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How to create a command-line password locker

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HowTos

Like many people, I have too many passwords to remember. To keep them straight, I wrote a simple password locker script using dialog and GnuPG (GNU Privacy Guard). The script prompts the user for a master password using a dialog box, unencrypts a file that holds a list of passwords, and opens the file in a text editor. When the editor is closed, the script re-encrypts the password file.

Dialog is an ncurses-based utility for providing text-based message and input boxes. GnuPG is a free implementation of the OpenPGP standard. Both applications are available as binary packages on Debian-based systems.

First, I had to create an encryption key using the command gpg --gen-key. I was prompted for the type of key I wanted to generate. Some keys were labeled "sign only," but I needed to use my key to encrypt data, so I selected "DSA and Elgamal" (which wasn't marked sign only). The only other important thing about the questions that followed was that I needed to remember what I typed when prompted for the "Real Name," because it is used when you encrypt.

Once I successfully generated my key, I needed to create a password file and encrypt it.

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