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Programming Leftovers

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  • LLVM Clang 12 Merges Support For x86_64 Microarchitecture Levels - Phoronix

    In an effort to better cater towards newer and common x86_64 instruction set extensions, open-source toolchain developers are moving ahead with the work on x86_64 micro-architecture feature levels for being able to target a handful of different "levels" beyond the base x86_64 instruction set. 

    The x86_64 feature levels are for easily segregating different classes of x86_64 Intel/AMD CPUs in hopes of making it easier for Linux distributions to increase their base requirements beyond just x86_64/AMD64 and improving compiler toolchains with a common set of possible levels / hardware capabilities in generating optimized libraries. This goes along with work pursued by Red Hat in raising the x86_64 CPU requirements for new RHEL/Fedora releases and for optimization initiatives like the glibc HWCAPS in supporting a few different optimization levels rather than having to target every possible Intel/AMD CPU microarchitecture family as is currently done for code optimization/tuning. 

  • RStudio is a refreshingly intuitive IDE | Christian Kastner

    I currently need to dabble with R for a smallish thing. I have previously dabbled with R only once, for an afternoon, and that was about a decade ago, so I had no prior experience to speak of regarding the language and its surrounding ecosystem.

    Somebody recommended that I try out RStudio, a popular IDE for R. I was happy to see that an open-source community edition exists, in the form of a .deb package no less, so I installed it and gave it a try.

    [...]

    This, and many other features that pop up here and there, like the live-rendering of LaTeX equations, contributed to what has to be one of the most positive experiences with an IDE that I've had so far.

  • Engaging in an "Open First" remote internship at Collabora

    The COVID-19 pandemic has forced companies to move very quickly to a partial or even full home office regime. In this context, Collabora is at a very privileged position, since remote work has always been at the core of our day to day operations. Over 80% of our people work remotely from all over the world even when our offices are open.

    As the pandemic continues to wreak havoc across the world, many students' scholarships have been impacted one way or the other. As the world economy is being shaken, many of them are facing challenges finding internships and entering into the professional life.

    At Collabora, and despite of COVID-19, we want remote internships to have the power to get students, regardless of where they live, into a dream job. Or, at the very least, provide them with informative venues for exploring and confirming (or not) professional interests. Our internships also connect students with a larger ecosystem of FLOSS projects and vendors, serving as a good way to improve their visibility and networking.

  • Nibble Stew: Cargo-style dependency management for C, C++ and other languages with Meson

    My previous blog post about modern C++ got a surprising amount of feedback. Some people even reimplemented the program in other languages, including one in Go, two different ones in Rust and even this slightly brain bending C++ reimplementation as a declarative style pipeline. It also got talked about on Reddit and Hacker news. Two major comments that kept popping up were the following.

    [...]

    One notable downside of this approach is that WrapDB does not have all that many packages yet. However I have been told that given the next Meson release (in a few weeks) and some upstream patches, it is possible to build the entire GTK widget toolkit as a subproject, even on Windows. 

    If anyone wants to contribute to the project, contributions are most welcome. You can for example convert existing projects and submit them to wrapdb or become a reviewer. The Meson web site has the relevant documentation. 

  • Percepio Releases Tracealyzer Visual Trace Diagnostics Solution Version 4.4 with Support for Embedded Linux

    -Percepio, the leader in visual trace diagnostics for embedded and IoT software systems, today announced the immediate availability of Tracealyzer version 4.4 with support for embedded Linux. Tracealyzer gives developers a high level of insight during software debugging and verification at the system level by enabling visual exploratory analysis from the top down. This makes it easy to spot issues during full system testing and drill down into the details to find the cause.

  • Facebook Is Looking To Upstream Their BOLT Binary Performance Optimizer Into LLVM - Phoronix

    Facebook's BOLT is a multi-year project focused on speeding up the performance of binaries. This open-source project initially focused on being able to better optimize Linux x86_64/ARM64 ELF binaries as a post-link optimizer. BOLT has been seeing much success with even Google using it now for better performance and now there is work to upstream it as part of the LLVM project. 

    Facebook engineers are hoping to see BOLT added to LLVM as a binary optimization framework. Google has reported with their own workloads that BOLT can normally provide 2~6% uplift on top of the abilities of compiler optimizations. Other organizations and academia also have been using BOLT in varying capacities. 

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  • 5 steps to learn any programming language | Opensource.com

    Some people love learning new programming languages. Other people can't imagine having to learn even one. In this article, I'm going to show you how to think like a coder so that you can confidently learn any programming language you want.

    [...]

    With just a little programming experience, which you can gain from any one of several introductory articles here on Opensource.com, you can go on to learn any programming language in just a few days (sometimes less). Now, this isn't magic, and you do have to put some effort into it. And admittedly, it takes a lot longer than just a few days to learn every library available to a language or to learn the nuances of packaging your code for delivery. But getting started is easier than you might think, and the rest comes naturally with practice.

    When experienced programmers sit down to learn a new language, they're looking for five things. Once you know those five things, you're ready to start coding.

  • RcppZiggurat 0.1.6

    The RcppZiggurat package updates the code for the Ziggurat generator by Marsaglia and other which provides very fast draws from a Normal distribution. The package provides a simple C++ wrapper class for the generator improving on the very basic macros, and permits comparison among several existing Ziggurat implementations. This can be seen in the figure where Ziggurat from this package dominates accessing the implementations from the GSL, QuantLib and Gretl—all of which are still way faster than the default Normal generator in R (which is of course of higher code complexity).

  • The four things you must be able to do in nano

    Text editing is essential to Linux users. Historically, the Vim text editor has been the default tool for managing file contents. Today, many systems and many sysadmins prefer to use the nano text editor.

    [...]

    In some ways, using nano is more like using the keyboard shortcuts in Microsoft Word or LibreOffice Writer. Nano is significantly more powerful than I am showing here, so be sure to check the documentation for more tricks. If you're a Vim user and you find yourself on a distribution that only has nano available, at least you'll know these simple functions.

    I guess I'm old school (or just old), but I prefer Vim, even for very short and simple edits. I acknowledge that nano is easier, but I am in the habit of using Vim. In fact, I have it installed on my Mac and Windows computers, too.

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  • Sysadmin careers: the correlation between mentors and success | Enable Sysadmin

    Typically, the more information you have about a situation, the more successful you will be in navigating it. The same can be said about the level of experience you have in dealing with specific problems. This is what inspired me to explore the experience of other industry professionals. I had several great mentors over the years, and I always felt that the time spent learning from them paid off exponentially. It's not always some intellectual atom bomb that reshapes your skillset. Many times, the most powerful lessons are in the wisdom gained over time. Having the skill to act is great, but it helps to know when and how to act as well.

    We asked a group of our core contributors about their mentors and the impact of these experiences on their careers. Some had specific people in mind; however, an equal number stated that a close-knit team can be just as valuable as a single guiding force.

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  • Steinar H. Gunderson: plocate in testing

    plocate hit testing today, so it's officially on its way to bullseye Smile I'd love to add a backport to stable, but bpo policy says only to backport packages with a “notable userbase”, and I guess 19 installations in popcon isn't that Smile It's also hit Arch Linux, obviously Ubuntu universe, and seemingly also other distributions like Manjaro. No Fedora yet, but hopefully, some Fedora maintainer will pick it up. Smile

  • A PHP syntax for discardable assignments [LWN.net]

    Recently, John Bafford revived a years-long conversation on expanding the syntax of the PHP foreach statement to include iterating solely over keys. Bafford, who wrote a patch and request for comments (RFC) on the matter back in 2016, hopes to update his work and convince the community to adopt the abbreviated syntax in PHP 8.1. The community took Bafford's general idea and expanded it into other areas of the language.

  • Kata Containers rewritten in Rust gets a major speed boost

    Kata provides container isolation and security without the overhead of running them in a VM. Usually, containers are run in VMs for security, but that removes some of the advantages of using containers with their small resources footprint. Kata containers, however, can run on bare metal. 

    The purpose of runV was to make VMs run like containers. In Kata, this approach is combined with Intel's Clear Containers, which uses Intel built-in chip Virtual Technology (VT), to launch containers in lightweight virtual machines (VMs). With Kata, those containers are launched in runV.

    Despite the Intel connection, Kata Containers are hardware agnostic. Kata Containers are also built to be compatible with the Open Container Initiative (OCI) specification, and Kubernetes' container runtime interface (CRI).

  • Forlinx OK1028A-C networking SBC supports LVDS displays, 4G/5G modules

    Forlinx released two networking SBC’s with 10Gbps Ethernet powered by NXP LS1043A and LS1046A processor nearly exactly one year ago. Like many other networking SBCs they do not come with video output so configuration is done via a computer or laptop either through a UART interface or a web interface. But in some cases, such boards may be integrated into machines that require a display for human-machine interaction. That’s why Forlinx has now released a new networking board – OK1028A-C – powered by NXP QorIQ Layerscape LS1028A dual-core Cortex-A72 processor that natively supports video output up to 4K UHD resolution via an eDP/DisplayPort interface which the company used to provide an LVDS header.

  • Flex Logix InferX X1 AI Inference Accelerator Takes on NVIDIA Jetson Xavier NX

    When it comes to AI inference accelerators, NVIDIA has captured the market as drones, intelligent high-resolution sensors, network video recorders, portable medical devices, and other industrial IoT systems use NVIDIA Jetson Xavier NX. This might change as Flex Logix’s InferX X1 AI inference accelerator has been shown to outperform Jetson Xavier NX as well as Tesla T4. During the Linley Fall Conference 2020, Flex Logix showcased InferX X1 AI Inference Accelerator, its performance, and how it outperformed other edge inference chips. It is the most powerful edge inference coprocessor with high throughput, low latency, high accuracy, large model megapixels images, and small die for embedded computing devices at the edge.

More in Tux Machines

Latest Developments in Linux Mint and in Ubuntu

  • Monthly News – November 2020 – The Linux Mint Blog

    Christmas is coming fast. We’re hoping to release Linux Mint 20.1 during the holiday season but we’re on a very tight schedule. I’d like to thank you all for your donations and for your support. Before rushing back to work on 20.1, I’d like to share some of the progress we made on Hypnotix, our new IPTV player.

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  • Linux Mint Continues Developing Hypnotix As New Open-Source IPTV Player - Phoronix

    Linux Mint recently began developing a new open-source Linux IPTV player. That project "Hypnotix" is moving ahead and will be integrated with Linux Mint 20.1 while is also available as a standalone Debian package.  Over the course of November the developers working on Hypnotix added support for being able to configure among multiple IPTV providers, support for configuring via M3U playlists, various settings can now be controlled, and video-on-demand (VOD) libraries can also be handled for movies and TV series. Hypnotix has also added support for querying IMDB information for movies or TV series while watching it. 

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  • CLI-only MAAS operation | Ubuntu

    MAAS provides a state-of-the-art User Interface (UI), which simplifies usage. But you may not know that MAAS also has a robust Command-line Interface (CLI), which actually provides more functionality than the UI.  Everything you can do from the UI, you can do from the CLI, but not the other way round. Let’s walk through MAAS operations using only the CLI, and look at a few jq tricks to produce human-readable CLI output.

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  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 659

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 659 for the week of November 22 – 28, 2020. 

Harish Pillay 9v1hp: My ESP8266-01 Adventure

Here’s a video of the RPi working via a vnc setup (right side of the video) and on the left side the Arduino code for a second setup with an Arduino Yun device. Because the RPi does not have analog input pins, and since i did not want to create additional circuity to do ADC (analog to digital conversion), I created a second setup with the Arduino Yun which does have both digital and analog input options. The Arduino Yun is an interesting part of the Arduino family (although, it has sadly been deprecated) as it has both the microcontroller portion as well as a bridge to a Linux operating system (albeit running OpenWRT meant for the Yun) which allows for the Yun to be accessed via a wifi/wired link. Unlike products that are proprietary, even though the Yun I have has been deprecated, the device is open sourced and the code etc are all available to be used and worked on. The power of open source, open collaboration wins here handily. Given the success of working with the Yun, I figured that the work is done. But no! I wanted to further optimise the setup as the Yun should really be a prototyping board rather than a deployed in production board mainly because, in my case, I only need two sensors that need to be accessed and the Yun has lots of other pins for a larger project. Read more Also: New product: Raspberry Pi 4 Case Fan

Debian: Installing Debian Testing and Debian Developer Reports

  • Install Debian Testing ( the most recent bullseye weekly build ) with KDE Plasma on bare metal

    It appears that straight forward install Debian Testing via official ISO image at least in meantime hangs . Looks like "sddm" hangs attempting to pop up logging screen prompt

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, November 2020

    I was assigned 16 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 4.5 hours from earlier months. I worked 11.5 hours this month, so I will carry over 9 hours to December.

  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities for 2020-11

    This month just went past way too fast, didn’t get to all the stuff I wanted to, but managed to cover many essentials (not even listed here) that I’ll cover in follow-up posts. In particular, highlights that I’m thankful for are that we’ve selected the final artwork for Bullseye. We’ve also successfully hosted another two MiniDebConfs. One that was gaming themed, and a Brazilian event all in Portuguese! Videos are up on Debian’s PeerTube instance (Gaming Edition | Brazil) and on the DebConf video archive for direct download.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities November 2020

    This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

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