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Ubuntu 20.10 Arrives Today! Here are 11 New Features in Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 20.10 releases today. An Ubuntu fan may get excited about the new features it brings.

Ubuntu 20.10 codenamed Groovy Gorilla is a non-LTS release with nine months of life cycle. You cannot expect drastic changes between subsequent releases.

It doesn’t mean you won’t find new things in Ubuntu 20.10. There are some performance improvements, new Linux kernel and visual changes thanks to the latest release of GNOME 3.38 (and other desktop environments in various other Ubuntu flavors).

Let’s see what new features Ubuntu 20.10 brings.

Read more

What’s New in Ubuntu 20.10 ‘Groovy Gorilla,’ Available Today

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 20.10 ‘Groovy Gorilla,’ Available Today

    The Groovy Gorilla has hit the streets and, again, this is an interim build of the massively popular Linux distribution. Every two years, Canonical releases a long-term support (LTS) version of Ubuntu that’s supported for five years.

    Still, Canonical releases new versions of Ubuntu every six months. Every LTS release is followed by three interim releases before the next LTS release. These collect the changes and improvements that have been made so far en route to the next LTS version.

    These interim builds allow Canonical’s developers to collect feedback and conduct field testing on their work so far. Interim builds also give people a chance to play with the latest, greatest version of the software.

    The April 2020 release (20.04 “Focal Fossa”) was the most recent LTS version, so six months down the development road, Groovy Gorilla doesn’t deliver any big surprises or shake-ups. The Gorilla has had its dusters out, polishing and shining here and there, but that’s about it.

    That’s not to say this isn’t a slick and (throughout our testing) stable build. So far, it seems rock-solid and looks great, but is it worth leaving a long-term service release?

Ubuntu 20.10 Download and Upgrade

  • Essential Guide: How to Upgrade to Ubuntu 20.10 from Ubuntu 20.04

    The Ubuntu upgrade process is fairly straightforward and shouldn’t take that long providing you have a semi-decent internet connection.

    There are a few things to keep in mind before rushing into an upgrade though so do pay close attention to the steps laid out in this tutorial.

  • Ubuntu 20.10 is Now Available to Download

    The official release announcement hasn’t been sent to the Ubuntu mailing list, but Ubuntu 20.10 desktop .iso images are up on the release server, ready for you (and everyone else) to download.

    Ubuntu 20.10 ‘Groovy Gorilla’ is a short-term release. It comes with 9 months of security updates, critical fixes, and select software updates from Canonical, makers of Ubuntu.

Ubuntu 20.10 Released With GNOME 3.38, Active Directory Install

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Released With GNOME 3.38, Active Directory Installer Integration

    Ubuntu 20.10, the "Groovy Gorilla", is now officially available.

    Ubuntu 20.10 features many improvements like:

    - The GNOME 3.38 desktop is available with a wealth of improvements there including several performance optimizations / fixes handled by Canonical's desktop team.

    - Continued work on the experimental OpenZFS file-system support that is available as an option when installing Ubuntu.

LWN and original

Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Arrives With Linux 5.8, GNOME 3.38

  • Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Arrives With Linux 5.8, GNOME 3.38, Raspberry Pi 4 Support

    Just two days ago, Ubuntu marked the 16th anniversary of its first ever release, Ubuntu 4.10 “Warty Warthog,” which showed Linux could be a more user friendly operating system.

    Back to now, after the six months of development cycle and the release of the current long-term Ubuntu 20.04 “Focal Fossa,” Canonical has announced a new version called Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” along with its seven official flavor: Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Kylin, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, and Ubuntu Studio.

    Ubuntu 20.10 is a short term or non-LTS release, which means it will be supported for 9 months until July 2021. Though v20.10 does not seem a major release, it does come with a lot of exciting and new features.

Ubuntu 20.10 overview | Fast, secure and simple.

The Ubuntu desktop has a vision problem - Ubuntu 20.10 review

  • The Ubuntu desktop has a vision problem - Ubuntu 20.10 review

    We're nearing the end of October already, and this means it's time for a new release of Ubuntu 20.10, Groovy Gorilla. There are new desktop features, and new plumbing, as always, but I mostly have some thoughts about the Ubuntu desktop in general. Does 20.10 deserve its name?

Looking At Six Flavors of Ubuntu 20.10 "Groovy Gorilla"

  • Looking At Six Flavors of Ubuntu 20.10 "Groovy Gorilla"

    In this video, I take a quick look at the recently released (or soon-to-be-released) versions of Ubuntu 20.10 codenamed "Groovy Gorilla." I will briefly look at the flagship Ubuntu distribution as well as: Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie and Ubuntu MATE.

10 Things to Do After Installing Ubuntu 20.10

  • 10 Things to Do After Installing Ubuntu 20.10

    A new Ubuntu release means a new rundown of the most important post-install procedures you should perform.

    This guide is (as always) aimed at those who are new to – or less experienced with – Ubuntu. Each item aims to enhance or improve the default Ubuntu 20.10 experience, not rip it out or remould it

    I write a new “things to do…” list for each Ubuntu release rather than just update the old one. Why do I do that? Because the steps often change. Issues that needed post-install futzing last time may now be fixed.

The press release

  • Ubuntu 20.10 on Raspberry Pi delivers the full Linux desktop and micro clouds

    Canonical today released Ubuntu 20.10 with optimised Raspberry Pi images for desktop in support of learners, inventors, educators and entrepreneurs, bringing the world’s most open platform to the world’s most accessible hardware.

    “In this release, we celebrate the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s commitment to put open computing in the hands of people all over the world,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO at Canonical. “We are honoured to support that initiative by optimising Ubuntu on the Raspberry Pi, whether for personal use, educational purposes or as a foundation for their next business venture.”

    The Raspberry Pi 2, 3, and 4 join a very long list of x86 and ARM devices certified with Ubuntu, the operating system (OS) best known for its public cloud and desktop offerings. Dell, HP and Lenovo all certify PCs with Ubuntu Desktop, which is also the most widely used OS on the AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google, IBM and Oracle clouds.

    Ubuntu 20.10 also includes LXD 4.6 and MicroK8s 1.19 for resilient micro clouds, small clusters of servers providing VMs and Kubernetes on demand at the edge, for remote office, branch office, warehouse and distribution oriented infrastructure.

Ubuntu MATE 20.10 Release Notes

  • Ubuntu MATE 20.10 Release Notes

    If you want bug fixes :bug:, kernel updates :corn:, a new web camera control :movie_camera:, and a new indicator :point_right: experience, then 20.10 is for you :tada:. Ubuntu MATE 20.10 will be supported for 9 months until July 2021. If you need Long Term Support, we recommend you use Ubuntu MATE 20.04 LTS.

Build a Raspberry Pi Desktop with an Ubuntu heart | Ubuntu

  • Build a Raspberry Pi Desktop with an Ubuntu heart | Ubuntu

    Since the Raspberry Pi Foundation began its mission, users have been using their boards to run everything in their lives. Whether that’s making DIY devices, learning to code or building products, it was made possible by Raspberry Pis. But running a full-featured, LTS desktop that can handle the expectations of everyday users, without technical knowledge, wasn’t really possible. Until recently.

    The Raspberry Pi 4 debuted with the graphics, RAM and connectivity needed for a Linux workstation. Users finally had the hardware to make a Raspberry Pi into a viable primary PC. But there were still issues. Most importantly, a lot of the desktop options either required a non-zero amount of technical knowledge or weren’t suited for long term use. Usually because of a lack of upstream support or running unmaintained, niche software.

    Canonical, the company that publishes Ubuntu, is and continues to be a long term fan of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. Together, our missions to make technology more accessible to people all of the world aligns, and both organisations understand the value of an active and trusting community. So, when the Raspberry Pi 4 launched with the capabilities to run a full-fat Ubuntu Desktop, we didn’t blink.

Ubuntu 20.10 Flavours Released, This is What’s (Mostly) New

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Flavours Released, This is What’s (Mostly) New

    Arriving alongside the final Ubuntu 20.10 release are new builds from Ubuntu’s family of flavours, which includes Kubuntu, Ubuntu MATE and Ubuntu Budgie.

    Rather than publish individual posts for each flavour I decided to post this instead: a concise roundup limited to just two paragraphs per flavour.

    Short though that sounds I still present flavour’s key changes and new features, plus give you the download links you need if you want to try a flavour out for yourself.

Ubuntu Linux 20.10 'Groovy Gorilla' and Another Video

  • Ubuntu Linux 20.10 'Groovy Gorilla' is Here With Renewed Raspberry Pi Focus - Slashdot
  • Ubuntu 20.10 now supports Raspberry Pi » Linux Magazine

    Ubuntu 20.10 is the first release from Canonical to support the Raspberry Pi single board computer.

    For any Linux admin who’s been looking to deploy single board computers for various purposes, there’s a new (while at the same time old) player in the Raspberry Pi mix—Ubuntu 20.10. Groovy Gorilla is the first official Ubuntu release to not only be optimized for the Raspberry Pi as a server distro, but as a full-blown desktop as well.

    To make this even more appealing, Ubuntu 20.10 will include the likes of LXD 4.6 and MicroK8s for the easy deployment of resilient micro clouds, small clusters of servers providing virtual machines, and Kubernetes on demand at the edge.

    Any Raspberry Pi 4 board with 4GB or 8GB of RAM can be deployed with Ubuntu Desktop or Server. And this isn’t a stripped-down version of the platform, it’s the full Monty. Canonical has put in a ton of work to optimize Ubuntu for Raspberry Pi. According to the Ubuntu PR Machine, “With this release, Ubuntu is optimized for Raspberry Pi, giving users of all levels and capabilities the access to Linux and microcloud technologies.”

  • What's new in Ubuntu 20.10 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at what's new in Ubuntu 20.10.

More on Ubuntu and Irs 'Flavours'

  • Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) released

    Codenamed “Groovy Gorilla”, 20.10 continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

    The Ubuntu kernel has been updated to the 5.8 based Linux kernel, and our default toolchain has moved to gcc 10 with glibc 2.32. Additionally, there is now a desktop variant of the Raspberry Pi image for Raspberry Pi 4 4GB and 8GB.

    Ubuntu Desktop 20.10 introduces GNOME 3.38, the fastest release yet with significant performance improvements delivering a more responsive experience. Additionally, the desktop installer includes the ability to connect to Active Directory domains.

  • Kubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla released

    The Kubuntu community are delighted to announce the release of Kubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla. For this release Kubuntu ships with Plasma 5.19.5 and Applications 20.08. The desktop carries the fresh new look and gorgeous wallpaper design selected by the KDE Visual Design Group.

    [...]

    Dolphin, KDE’s file explorer, for example, adds previews for more types of files and improvements to the way long names are summarized, allowing you to better see what each file is or does.

    [...]

    For those of you into photography, KDE’s professional photo management application, digiKam has just released its version 7.0.0. The highlight here is the smart face recognition feature that uses deep-learning to match faces to names and even recognizes pets.

    If it is the night sky you like photographing, you must try the new version of KStars. Apart from letting you explore the Universe and identify stars from your desktop and mobile phone, new features include more ways to calibrate your telescope and get the perfect shot of heavenly bodies.

  • Ubuntu Studio 20.10 Released – Ubuntu Studio

    The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Studio 20.10, code-named “Groovy Gorilla”. This marks Ubuntu Studio’s 28th release. This release is a regular release, and as such it is supported for nine months until July 2021.

    Since it’s just out, you may experience some issues, so you might want to wait a bit before upgrading. Please see the release notes for a complete list of changes and known issues.

    You can download Ubuntu Studio 20.10 from our download page.

  • Seven Official Flavors Of Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Released

    Yesterday, Canonical announced the release of the new non-LTS Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” with Linux kernel 5.8, GNOME 3.38, optimized desktop image for Raspberry Pi 4, and nine months of support until July 2021.

  • Lubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) Released! | Lubuntu

    Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, Lubuntu 20.10 has been released! With the codename Groovy Gorilla, Lubuntu 20.10 is the 19th release of Lubuntu, the fifth release of Lubuntu with LXQt as the default desktop environment.

    [...]

    Lubuntu 18.04 LTS, the last supported release with LXDE, will be supported until April 2021 and Lubuntu 20.04 LTS will be supported until April 2023. For both of these releases, we are limiting changes to critical fixes and underlying system changes shipped with all other Ubuntu flavors.

Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla released

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla released

    Ubuntu has announced the latest release of its Linux-based operating system, codenamed Groovy Gorilla.

    Ubuntu 20.10 is the first Ubuntu release to feature desktop images for the Raspberry Pi 4.

    “The Ubuntu kernel has been updated to the 5.8 based Linux kernel, and our default toolchain has moved to gcc 10 with glibc 2.32. Additionally, there is now a desktop variant of the Raspberry Pi image for Raspberry Pi 4 4GB and 8GB,” the Ubuntu release team said in its announcement.

    Ubuntu Desktop 20.10 introduces GNOME 3.38, which the Ubuntu team said comes with significant performance improvements and a more responsive user experience.

Ubuntu 20.10 Released, Download Now

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Released, Download Now

    Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla is now available for the download. For your information, Ubuntu 20.10 ‘Groovy Gorilla’ is a short-term release version with 9 months of security updates and critical fixes.

    Along with Ubuntu 20.10, all the flavours are also available for the download from the respective official website. One of the interesting part of the Ubuntu 20.10 release is it’s desktop support for the Raspberry Pi4 (4GB + 8GB models).

By Ade Malsasa Akbar

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla Family Released

    Ubuntu 20.10 aka Groovy Gorilla finally released by Canonical bringing the latest and greatest Free Libre Open Source Software technology to worldwide computer users. What's new in this release is that it's the first time Ubuntu Desktop available for Raspberry Pi – the world most popular ARM-based computers. Now here's list of Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu for Raspberry Pi download links, as well as Official Flavors from Kubuntu to Ubuntu Budgie with Checksums included. Simply click and download. Happy downloading!

Chris Titus Tech in video

Ubuntu 20.10 on Raspberry Pi...

  • Ubuntu 20.10 on Raspberry Pi delivers the full Linux desktop and micro clouds

    Canonical has released Ubuntu 20.10 with optimised Raspberry Pi images for desktop and server, in support of learners, inventors, educators and entrepreneurs, bringing the world’s most open platform to the world’s most accessible hardware.

    The Raspberry Pi 2, 3, and 4 join a very long list of x86 and ARM devices certified with Ubuntu, the operating system (OS) best known for its public cloud and desktop offerings. Dell, HP and Lenovo all certify PCs with Ubuntu Desktop, which is also the most widely used OS on the AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google, IBM and Oracle clouds.

    Ubuntu 20.10 also includes LXD 4.6 and MicroK8s 1.19 for resilient micro clouds, small clusters of servers providing VMs and Kubernetes on demand at the edge, for remote office, branch office, warehouse and distribution oriented infrastructure.

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla update brings Ubuntu Desktop to the Raspberry Pi

    Canonical has announced the release of Ubuntu 20.10, aka ‘Groovy Gorilla’. The big news in this release is a newly optimized stack that brings Ubuntu Desktop and Server to the Raspberry Pi range. Since the launch of the Raspberry Pi 4 in 2019, the diminutive computer line has been increasingly sympathetic to being used as a desktop alternative, and the arrival of a tailored version of the biggest Linux GUI (Android excluded, of course) is a significant step on that road.

    “In this release, we celebrate the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s commitment to put open computing in the hands of people all over the world,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO at Canonical. “We are honored to support that initiative by optimizing Ubuntu on the Raspberry Pi, whether for personal use, educational purposes, or as a foundation for their next business venture.”

    Ubuntu 20.10 can also run on RP 2 and 3 variants but only with 4GB RAM and above – if you go lower than that, you’ll probably get a smooth installation but a glitchy experience. You’ll also see improved support for 2-in-1 devices with on-screen keyboard modes, and more devices of all form-factors now support fingerprint readers under Linux.

  • Ubuntu clouds on the Raspberry Pi

    Canonical, Ubuntu Linux's parent company, just released Ubuntu 20.10. This "Groovy Gorilla" is a short-term release (STR) that's only supported for 9 months. If you want an Ubuntu to use in production you want the long-term support (LTS) Ubuntu 20.04. But, the new Ubuntu does come with one new feature that Raspberry Pi users will appreciate. It's the first version to come with optimized Raspberry Pi images for the desktop, server, and the cloud. Yes, the cloud. Stick with me. Here's how it works.

    First, Ubuntu 20.10 is built on top of the Linux 5.8 kernel. For the desktop, it now uses the GNOME 3.38 release. It also comes with the latest and greatest open-source desktop programs such as the Firefox 81 web browser, the Thunderbird 73 e-mail client, and the LibreOffice 7.0.2 office suite. For Ubuntu workers in a primarily Windows shop, you can now install Ubuntu with Active Directory (AD) integration. Oh, and you can now run the full desktop on the Raspberry Pi 2, 3, and 4.

Ubuntu 20.10 'Groovy Gorilla' Swings Onto Raspberry Pi

  • Ubuntu 20.10 'Groovy Gorilla' Swings Onto Raspberry Pi

    We have tested Ubuntu 20.10 installation via an external NVMe drive connected using USB 3. We can confirm that this is possible and much simpler than previously indicated. The Ubuntu 20.10 image for Raspberry Pi 4 can be directly written to a USB drive using Balena Etcher or Raspberry Pi Imager. To boot from USB the Raspberry Pi 4 will need be configured using Raspberry Pi OS as per our guide.

By TechRepublic and Ji

Coverage by Eric Brown

  • Ubuntu 20.10 release showcases Raspberry Pi support

    Canonical released Ubuntu 20.10 with optimized Raspberry Pi images for all major Pi SBCs and modules, including a full Desktop version that runs on higher-end models. There is also improved micro cloud support, including the Pi-ready MicroK8s 1.19.

    With last October’s launch of Ubuntu 19.10, Canonical improved on the Linux distribution’s Raspberry Pi support by supporting the Raspberry Pi 4. The release included Pi support for a new version of MicroK8s — Canonical’s single-node Kubernetes environment — that provides “strict confinement” to enable easier deployment of k8s containers on edge gateways. This June, Canonical launched Ubuntu Appliance for container-like apps based on Ubuntu Core snap packages that run on the Raspberry Pi. Now, with Ubuntu 20.10, Ubuntu extends its support for the Pi with several optimized images.

Ubuntu 20.10 goes full Raspberry Pi, from desktop to micro cloud

  • Ubuntu 20.10 goes full Raspberry Pi, from desktop to micro clouds: Full fat desktop on a Pi is usable

    Ubuntu 20.10 is out, with Canonical highlighting its Raspberry Pi support, including not only desktop support but also micro clouds based on MicroK8s, the company's lightweight Kubernetes distribution.

    Codenamed "Groovy Gorilla," Ubuntu 20.10 is only supported for nine months, unlike its predecessor 20.04 which is a long-term support release. It is based on the 5.8 Linux kernel, which is a substantial upgrade from 5.4 as used in 20.10, with Btrfs RAID 1 support, USB 4 (based on Thunderbolt 3), updates to support features of recent CPUs Intel Ice Lake and Tiger Lake graphics, AMD Zen 3, and more. Also included by default is GNOME desktop 3.38, the latest version.

    [...]

    The company will be hoping to attract enterprises with IoT deployments or use cases for edge computing.

    OpenStack users will find the latest Victoria release now available in Ubuntu 20.10, though the release notes observe that "upgrading an OpenStack deployment is a non-trivial process," probably an understatement.

    Pi aside, this is not the biggest of Ubuntu releases but keeps the momentum going for Canonical's distribution, hugely popular for server use on public cloud and becoming more polished for desktop users too.

From StorageReview.com

  • Canonical Announced Ubuntu 20.10 On Raspberry Pi

    Canonical released Ubuntu 20.10 with optimized Raspberry Pi images for desktop and server, in support of learners, inventors, educators and entrepreneurs. Raspberry Pi 2, 3, and 4 supports Ubuntu 20.10. Ubuntu 20.10 is said to also includes LXD 4.6 and MicroK8s 1.19 for resilient micro clouds, small clusters of servers providing VMs and Kubernetes on demand at the edge, for remote office, branch office, warehouse and distribution oriented infrastructure.

Real-time Analytics News Roundup for Week Ending October 24

  • Real-time Analytics News Roundup for Week Ending October 24

    Canonical released Ubuntu 20.10 with optimized Raspberry Pi images for desktop and server. The Raspberry Pi 2, 3, and 4 join a very long list of x86 and ARM devices certified with Ubuntu. Dell, HP, and Lenovo all certify PCs with Ubuntu Desktop, which is also the most widely used OS on the AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google, IBM, and Oracle clouds. Ubuntu 20.10 includes LXD 4.6 and MicroK8s 1.19 for resilient micro clouds, small clusters of servers providing VMs, and Kubernetes on demand at the edge, for remote office, branch office, warehouse, and distribution-oriented infrastructure. Specifically, Canonical introduced its micro cloud stack that combines MAAS, LXD, MicroK8s, and Ceph on Ubuntu, to deliver resilient pocket clouds hardened for mission-critical workloads in 5G RANs, industry 4.0 factories, V2X infrastructures, smart cities, and health care facilities.

Ubuntu 20.10 Review - Is it worth the Upgrade? - YouTube

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Review - Is it worth the Upgrade? - YouTube

    Canonical has recently released Ubuntu 20.10, which follows Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. With only 9 months of support, is it worth upgrading from an LTS release? In this video, we'll take a look at the latest version of this popular Linux distribution and see whether or not you should consider upgrading.

Xubuntu 20.10 released! - Xubuntu

  • Xubuntu 20.10 released! « Xubuntu

    The Xubuntu team is happy to announce the immediate release of Xubuntu 20.10!

    Xubuntu 20.10, codenamed Groovy Gorilla, is a regular release and will be supported for 9 months, until July 2021. If you need a stable environment with longer support time we recommend that you use Xubuntu 20.04 LTS instead.

    The final release images are available as torrents and direct downloads from xubuntu.org/download/.

    As the main server might be busy in the first few days after the release, we recommend using the torrents if possible.

    Xubuntu Core, our minimal installation option, is available to download from unit193.net/xubuntu/core/ [torrent, magnet]. Find out more about Xubuntu Core here.

    We’d like to thank everybody who contributed to this release of Xubuntu!

Edge cloud boost for Raspberry Pi 4

  • Edge cloud boost for Raspberry Pi 4

    Version 20.10 of Ubuntu from Canonical on the Raspberry Pi 4 card and module for the first time supports cloud software such as Kubernetes for distributed cloud software at the edge the network for industrial applications.
    A new version of Linux is enabling edge cloud capability on the latest Raspberry Pi compute card.

    Version 20.10 of Ubuntu from Canonical for the first time provides full desktop Linux on the Raspberry Pi4 board and Compute module, but also supports cloud software such as Kubernetes. This has the potential to put distributed cloud software at the edge of the network for industrial applications.

    [...]

    On a Raspberry Pi, users can start with MicroK8s, to orchestrate highly available workloads at the edge or with LXD to build a home lab appliance using LXD’s clustering and virtual machine management capabilities. The Ubuntu 20.10 release introduces users a way to experiment, test, or develop with full cloud capabilities through the Raspberry Pi, including robotics and AI/ML.

Ubuntu Is No Longer Exciting, a Look at Ubuntu Kylin 20.10

Ubuntu Groovy Gorilla adds Raspberry Pi as a “first class"...

  • Ubuntu Groovy Gorilla adds Raspberry Pi as a “first class citizen”

    Last week, Canonical released the latest intermediate version of Ubuntu, 20.10 "Groovy Gorilla"—which, for the first time, adds first-class platform support for the Raspberry Pi 4.
    Groovy Gorilla itself is a pretty typical interim release, offering an updated GNOME version (3.38) with lots of bugfixes and small feature additions, such as drag-and-drop organization of folders and shortcuts in the Applications grid. Support has also been added for Windows Active Directory in the Ubiquity OS installer itself.

    Canonical embraces the Pi

    While it has been possible for some time to install Ubuntu on Raspberry Pi hardware, up until now that has been strictly a community effort. The Pi itself ships with Raspberry Pi OS, a Debian-based distribution whose origins began with the Pi community, but which has since been officially adopted and supported by the Raspberry Pi Foundation itself. And while Canonical added the Pi as a supported platform in 20.04 Focal Fossa earlier this year, that support was only for the Ubuntu Server distribution—not Desktop.

    With 20.10 Groovy Gorilla, Canonical has added full desktop support for the Pi 4. Martin Wimpress, Canonical's director of engineering for the Ubuntu Desktop, says this means the Pi is now a "first-class citizen." Canonical guarantees the same level of integration, QA, and support from kernel to userspace that it does for an x86 PC. The entire Ubuntu software repository—save for specifically architecture-targeted packages, which start with names like i386—is available and supported on the Pi.

Ubuntu 20.10 Delivers Linux Desktop on Raspberry Pi

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Delivers Linux Desktop on Raspberry Pi

    Ubuntu Desktop 20.10 is optimized for Raspberry Pi images and is the first release of Ubuntu for the desktop. Support for the Ubuntu server on the Raspberry Pi, however, has been available since the 20.04 LTS release. In addition to Raspberry Pi desktop support, Ubuntu 20.10 includes GNOME 3.38 and other features as outlined in the release notes.
    Ubuntu 20.10 includes Canonical's micro cloud stack combines Metal-as-a-Service (MAAS), LXD, MicroK8s, and Ceph storage. MicroK8s 1.19 and LXD 4.6 are for resilient micro clouds, small clusters of servers providing VMs and Kubernetes on the edge. MicroK8s provides the ability to orchestrate workloads on the edge. LXD allows to build a home lab appliance with it's clustering and VM capabilities that become available on the Raspberry Pi via Ubuntu desktop. It's possible to do pretty much everything an average desktop user would expect on a Raspberry Pi 4.
    With a Raspberry Pi 4, a microSD card (8GB recommended) and a few other accessories it's possible to install Ubuntu Desktop as outlined in the tutorial.

Unix Tutorial

  • Ubuntu 20.10 - Groovy Gorilla

    It’s late October, and this means that another X.10 release of Ubuntu has just arrived: Ubuntu 20.10 - Groovy Gorilla - is now available for download.

...Released and Download link Included

  • Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) Released and Download link Included

    The Ubuntu 20.10 release is out. "The Ubuntu kernel has been updated to the 5.8 based Linux kernel, and our default toolchain has moved to gcc 10 with glibc 2.32. Additionally, there is now a desktop variant of the Raspberry Pi image for Raspberry Pi 4 4GB and 8GB. Ubuntu Desktop 20.10 introduces GNOME 3.38, the fastest release yet with significant performance improvements delivering a more responsive Experience.

    New features in Ubuntu 20.10

    Codenamed "Groovy Gorilla", 20.10 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

    The Ubuntu kernel has been updated to the 5.8 based Linux kernel, and our default toolchain has moved to gcc 10 with glibc 2.32. Additionally,there is now a desktop variant of the Raspberry Pi image for Raspberry Pi 4 4GB and 8GB.

    Ubuntu Desktop 20.10 introduces GNOME 3.38, the fastest release yet with significant performance improvements delivering a more responsive Experience. Additionally, the desktop installer includes the ability to connect to Active Directory domains.

What's New in Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla?

  • What's New in Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla? Why You Should Give Ubuntu Another Shot

    Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla is now available for download and install. If you’ve been away from Ubuntu for a while, is this the release to make you jump back on board the Canonical groove train? Here's everything you need to know about Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla!

    [...]

    However, in recent years, even standard releases have become less ambitious and instead focused more on fine-tuning and polishing the Ubuntu experience than venturing into new territory.

    Ubuntu was once the default suggestion for novices interested in try Linux: its user-friendliness, supportive community, and just-works philosophy led to wide-spread adoption. And while it's still one of the most popular distros, Ubuntu has lost some favor due to a number of missteps over the last decade---for example, bundling Amazon adware and radically redesigning the desktop.

    As a result, Canonical’s distro now battles Linux Mint, Manjaro, and MX Linux for the top spot in many distro review round-ups and user recommendations. So, in that light...

Ubuntu (Finally) Officially Lands On The Raspberry Pi

  • Ubuntu (Finally) Officially Lands On The Raspberry Pi. But Will Anyone Notice? | Hackaday

    The Raspberry Pi has been with us for over eight years now, and during that time it has seen a myriad operating system ports. It seems that almost anything can be run on the little computer, but generally the offerings have seen minority uptake in the face of the officially supported Raspbian, or as it’s now called, Raspberry Pi OS.

    Maybe that could change, with the arrival of an Ubuntu release for the platform. For those of you pointing out that this is nothing new, what makes the new version 20.10 release special is that it’s the first official full Ubuntu release, rather than an unofficial port.

    So Raspberry Pi 4 owners can now install the same full-fat Ubuntu they have on their PCs, and with the same official Ubuntu support. What does this really do for them that Raspberry Pi OS doesn’t? Underneath they share Debian underpinnings, and they both benefit from a huge quantity of online resources should the user find themselves in trouble. Their repositories both contain almost every reasonable piece of software that could be imagined, so the average Pi user might be forgiven for a little confusion.

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    ICP Germany has recently introduced the MiTAC ME1-8MD series family of compact, fanless Linux embedded systems powered by NXP i.MX 8M processor and designed to be used as IoT gateways, data acquisition and processing systems, and mini servers. Three models have been launched with a choice of dual or quad-core processors, up to 4GB LPDDR4 RAM, and 32GB eMMC flash storage. The embedded computers also come with up to two Ethernet ports, support up to two displays, and include an internal Raspberry Pi compatible 40 pin GPIO header.

  • Official Raspberry Pi 4 case fan adds cooling to Raspberry Pi 4 case

    When the Raspberry Pi Foundation first introduced the Raspberry Pi 4, they claimed the board would work just fine under most cases without a heatsink, and the latter was only really needed under load. That may have been true when using the board in a temperate climate like in the United Kingdom, but then Raspberry Pi 4 met Thailand with some benchmarks results lower than on a Raspberry Pi 3. People using plastic enclosures had even more troubles. It’s only when I installed a heatsink on Raspberry Pi 4 that the board could really shine. The company also provided some firmware optimizations later on to further cool-down the board. But you can only do much with software, and many third-party cooling solutions such as fansinks or metal cases have been introduced for the popular SBC.

  • Pi-oT 2 IoT module adds 24V digital inputs, RS-485, and UPS to Raspberry Pi (Crowdfunding)

    Pi-oT was launched last year as a Raspberry Pi add-ons designed for commercial and industrial IoT automation. It features 5V I/Os, relays, and ADC inputs suitable for light-duty projects and prototyping. The company, called Edge Devices, has now launched an update with Pi-oT 2 adding optional support for 24V digital inputs, RS-485, and an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).

  • M5Paper ESP32 IoT development kit features a 4.7-inch e-Ink touchscreen display

    M5Stack has just launched its unique and latest core device with a touchscreen e-Ink display. M5Paper ESP32 IoT Development Kit is a fully programmable microcontroller-based platform that can be an ideal choice for your IoT applications. This low-power device could suit such purposes as an industrial controller or smart weather display.

today's howtos

  • Enable Timestamp For History Command In Fish Shell - OSTechNix

    Whenever a command is entered in the terminal, it will be saved at the end of the history file in Linux. You can easily retrieve these commands at any time using history command. The shell is also tracking the timestamp of all command entries, so that we can easily find when a specific command is executed. We already have shown you how to enable timestamp in Bash and Zsh shells. Today we will see how to enable timestamp for history command in Fish shell in Linux. In addition, we will also learn how to create a simple function to show the date and time stamps in history command output in fish shell.

  • Linux: How To Encrypt And Decrypt Files With A Password
  • How to convert pdf to image on Linux command line - nixCraft

    I have many PDF files, and I need to convert them to a png file format, add a border to those images, and convert back all those images to pdf format. How can I convert pdf to image format on Linux and vice versa using the CLI?

  • How To Install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a popular server scripting language known for creating dynamic and interactive Web pages. PHP is a widely-used programming language on the Web. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Restrict WordPress Site Access - Anto Online

    A lot of the time, you need to restrict access to various users on your website. Whether you’re cordoning premium content, sensitive pages, or content targeted to specific individuals, there are various ways you can restrict user access easily and effectively on your WordPress website. The easiest method is using plugins that you can just download and link with your website. If you have coding skills, you can also edit various functions to achieve the same thing. We shall also take a look at how you can restrict site managers with various levels of access. Whatever kind of site restrictions you need to accomplish, stick with us and we will help you do it.

Linux Kernel: Greg Kroah-Hartman's Talk and Panics

  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: Lessons for Developers from 20 Years of Linux Kernel Work [Ed: "The Linux Foundation is a sponsor of The New Stack" for the latter to write puff pieces such as these, so it's basically marketing]
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: 'Don't Make Users Mad'

    Kroah-Hartman explains that one of Linus Torvalds' most deeply-held convictions: don't break userspace. "Other operating systems have this rule as well — it's a very solid rule — because we always want you to upgrade. And we want you to upgrade without worrying about it. We don't want you to feel scared. If you see a new release, and we say, 'Hey, this fixes a bunch of problems,' we don't want you to feel worried about taking that. That's really really important — especially with security...." If you do make a change, make sure there truly is a compelling reason. "You have to provide enough reason and enough goodness to force somebody to take the time to learn to do something else. That's very rare." His example of this was systemd, which unified a variety of service configurations and initialization processes. "They did it right. They provided all the functionality, they solved a real problem that was there. They unified all these existing tools and problems in such a way that it was just so much better to use, and it provided enough impetus that everybody was willing to do the work to modify their own stuff and move to the new model. It worked. People still complain about it, but it worked. Everybody switched... It works well. It solves a real problem. "That was an example of how you can provide a compelling reason to move on — and make the change."

  • What to do in case of a Linux kernel panic

    Linux is used everywhere in the IT world. You've probably used Linux today, even if you didn't realize it. If you have learned anything about Linux, then you know it is indeed a kernel. The kernel is the primary unit of the Linux operating system (OS) and is responsible for communications between a computer's hardware and its processes. In this article, you will learn about one situation related to the Linux kernel: The kernel panic. The term itself can make you panic, but if you have the proper knowledge, then you can remain calm. Every system admin faces this issue at least once in their career, but reinstalling the system is not the first solution you should turn to. [...] Now, anytime you see a kernel panic error, you will definitely not panic because you know why this error occurred and how to resolve it. This article covers one of the common Linux boot problems: kernel panic. There are so many other potential boot problems that can occur in Linux, but resolving those issues will become much less of a panic when you gain some advanced knowledge of your system.