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Proprietary Software: Todoist, FreeOffice, and Even Worse

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Software
  • Todoist Takes on Trello with New Kanban Board Feature

    Todoist now has a Kanban board feature similar to that made popular by Trello.

    Kanban boards are an effective project management tool designed to make it easier to organise tasks within projects and get an overview of overall project status. While Kanban boards aren’t super fancy they are, for some, super useful.

    “A more visual way to organize your projects. Drag tasks between sections, visualize your progress, and simplify your teamwork,” Todoist say of the feature.

  • SoftMaker FreeOffice: A cross-platform Office suite that’s fully compatible to MS Office

    Most Linux users are well-acquainted with LibreOffice – many distributions have it pre-installed. Fewer know its powerful alternative: FreeOffice is a full-fledged office solution with full support for Microsoft Office file formats. It consists of a word processor, a spreadsheet and a presentation program. True to its name, FreeOffice is fully free and available for Linux in 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

    FreeOffice is far from a LibreOffice clone. The software is being developed by a German software company with a history going all the way back to 1987. Due to its background, FreeOffice has far more in common with Microsoft Office than with LibreOffice.

  • Cutting corners on cybersecurity can leave costly holes [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Such attacks can paralyse an organisation as it weighs up concerns over prolonged business interruption, reputational damage and data protection responsibilities against the financial impact and the ethical implications of capitulating to the demands. The decision to pay or not to pay is very much the question – especially when university budgets are so tight.

    The advice of the NCSC, as well as Jisc, is very clear: do not pay! A range of reasons are cited, but the prime one is the inability of institutions to be sure that the [attacker] will undo the damage and not exploit the data breach at a later date. Those who pay up justify doing so on the grounds of business criticality and expediency. They also rely on the “honour among thieves” paradigm that [attackers] will stick to their word so that victims of future attacks will also feel confident in paying up.

  • As critics call for deplatforming, defunding, and prosecution over Leila Khaled discussion, San Francisco State University president gets it right

    Yesterday, Zoom refused to allow the university to use its service for the discussion — a cancellation praised by FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr, who said there was no “need to hear both sides.” It is not yet clear whether the organizers of the event will switch to another channel of communication.

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