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LibreOffice – Designed by Committee

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LibO

LibreOffice has a lot of issues with its public image, marketing strategies, management, long-term vision, major code contributors, volunteer programmers, and code quality, in case you haven’t noticed by now. I will try to explain a few of those here.

[...]

Whoever comes towards LibreOffice, large organizations or government, the less than 1% users of LibreOffice, do so only because they did not want to pay anything in the first place. Ask them to pay, and they will easily move back to greener pastures. If they wanted, could, or were motivated to pay anything for a commodity, they would have picked one with a perceived quality and support with the least bugs and frictions.

Collabora et al., which I will call “eco-partners” in the rest of this post, picked an already established, free, open source, and known software that already had a mandate to stay open and free for all, no matter what, then they tried to make a business around it. It didn’t work. Now, the eco-partners are complaining that their business model is not working unless the software they chose does some marketing for them.

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Michael Meeks: 2020-09-07 Monday

  • Michael Meeks: 2020-09-07 Monday

    As should be obvious to anyone, the solution to committees - is more committees. Apparently this new one would set a technical direction that made more sense.

Project vs. Product

  • Project vs. Product

    Projects and NGOs do not care about how to become better products for users. Projects that forget their contributors over their users might not know it, but they are already dead.
    Projects and NGOs need to care about their contributors. In an ideal world they care about their contributors as individuals.
    The ONLY way projects have to care about users is the way their current and potential future contributors are motivated to use the output of the projects -- themselves or as proxy.
    Which is why I was repeating the dogma "project over product" again and again when I handed over and left the @tdforg Board of Directors.

More from Meeks

  • 2020-09-08 Tuesday

    Interested to read Bjoern's take on Project vs. Product - it seems obvious to me that TDF has somehow adopted "build a valuable product brand" as a goal somewhere along the way, alongside being a FOSS project - which can sometimes be counter-productive.

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Wine 5.20 Released

The Wine development release 5.20 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
  - More work on the DSS cryptographic provider.
  - A number of fixes for windowless RichEdit.
  - Support for FLS callbacks.
  - Window resizing in the new console host.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz
  http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
Read more Also: Wine 5.20 Released With Various Improvements For Running Windows Software On Linux