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How to choose a Linux distribution

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Linux

Linux. It’s a great operating system, but it’s hard to choose which distribution (which version) you want to use. So, which do you choose? You’re probably expecting me to tell you, right? You’re partially right. I’ll give you a big head start into choosing what distro (distribution) is best for you. Here’s the answer summed up: whatever works best for you.

There are many distributions out there, from Slackware to Arch and from Ubuntu to Gentoo. The easiest way to find which suits you is to try them all. The first I’d recommend trying is either Ubuntu or Fedora Core 6.

Ubuntu is based off the popular binary distribution Debian, which has been around for quite some time. Ubuntu uses the apt-get/apt repositories just like its mother distribution. It works well on most systems (including older, slower ones) and tends to have a good about of drivers and codecs in the repositories.

Fedora Core (6) is based of the Redhat distribution.

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