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Games: Android, GNU/Linux and New Titles

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Gaming
  • How to Find New and Exciting Games to Play on Android
  • 16 of the Best Free Games For Linux

    “Free” and “Linux” go hand in hand beautifully, like chips and a milkshake, and even though Linux isn’t widely seen as a gaming platform, there is a veritable wealth of free games you can get for it if you look in the right places. That’s in large part thanks to unpaid, open-source developers, who collaborate to bring classics (and new games) all together in Linux.

  • Quirky comedy point and click adventure 'Sol 705' is out now for Linux PC

    Sol 705, a point and click adventure that pays homage to the classics from the likes of Lucas Arts, Sierra is out now and it's added Linux PC support too.

    Developed by Land Patricio and Space Indie Studios, it appears this is a crowdfunded title that slipped through the cracks as we completely missed the successful Kickstarter from 2018 where the developer pulled in over ten thousand dollars. While it's designed like the classics, it does have plenty of modern touches from a hint system to voice acting for some of the seriously varied cast.

  • The Bomber Crew team announced Space Crew and it's coming to Linux PC

    Did you enjoy Bomber Crew? Runner Duck's strategic simulation game was a wonderful release from 2017 and they're now going aiming to go further with Space Crew.

    This was actually announced back in June, although at that point the platforms it was launching on was not confirmed. Towards the end of July, I spotted Linux appearing in the system requirements and today the developer emailed back with a firm confirmation, "Yes, we are planning on Space Crew supporting Linux at launch.".

  • Religion creation auto-battler Godhood has launched after a rough time for Abbey Games

    After going through funding and development troubles, Abbey Games have now launched the 1.0 release of their religion creation auto-battler Godhood.

    Quite a relaxing and laid-back experience that blends together a little bit of many things. You construct a religion, build up a little town and engage in hands-off turn-based battles that do everything for you so you get to sit back and watch how it all unfolds. Quite a different take on the auto-battling seen in the likes of Dota Underlords that's for sure.

  • The free Rise of Avalon expansion for Albion Online is live

    Free to play and now much bigger, Albion Online has a brand new expansion out with Rise of Avalon and there's lots of new goodies to play through.

    One of the biggest additions to Albion Online since it began, this brings the Roads of Avalon, a big network of magical pathways that bring new ways to travel, transport and engage in combat allowing you to explore the Wilderness of Avalon. Another huge addition are Corrupted Dungeons, giving Solo players something fun that mixes PvE and PvP invasions together in randomized dungeons. There's also fifteen powerful new Avalonian weapons to find.

  • Streets of Rogue gets a big bug-fix update as work continues on a sequel

    Streets of Rogue, one of my absolute favourite indie games has a new update out as work continues to find and fix every possible bug, plus a few new bits were added.

    Before getting into the juice of the update though, with the developer previously confirming a sequel is in the works (that should also come to Linux) they've briefly mentioned it again now. In the update notes, they mentioned how they're building up the tech needed for the sequel and that it's going "really smoothly.". This work will allow for a much bigger and more open world, which sounds pretty exciting!

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today's leftovers

Programming Leftovers

  • Joachim Breitner: Learn Haskell on CodeWorld writing Sokoban

    Two years ago, I held the CIS194 minicourse on Haskell at the University of Pennsylvania. In that installment of the course, I changed the first four weeks to teach the basics of Haskell using the online Haskell environment CodeWorld, and lead the students towards implementing the game Sokoban. As it is customary for CIS194, I put my lecture notes and exercises online, and this has been used as a learning resources by people from all over the world. But since I have left the University of Pennsylvania, I lost the ability to update the text, and as the CodeWorld API has evolved, some of the examples and exercises no longer work.

  • SiFive Begins Adding RISC-V "Bullet" Microarchitecture Code To LLVM

    On Friday night patches began to appear for "RISC-V Bullet" in the LLVM compiler code-base. The initial work is on the scheduler being added for the RISC-V Bullet. The initial scheduler is in place for the RISC-V Bullet microarchitecture and bullet-rv32 / bullet-rv64 naming.

  • Pho 1.0, Belated Release

    I was doing some disk housekeeping and noticed that my venerable image viewer, Pho, was at version 1.0pre1, and had been since 2017. It's had only very minimal changes since that time. I guess maybe it's been long enough that it's time to remove that -pre1 moniker, huh?

  • GammaRay 2.11.2

    We have released version 2.11.2 of our Qt application introspection tool GammaRay, bringing support for Qt 5.15 and improved Qt Quick item picking. GammaRay is a software introspection tool for Qt applications developed by KDAB. Leveraging the QObject introspection mechanism it allows you to observe and manipulate your application at runtime. This works both locally on your workstation and remotely on an embedded target.

  • A meta issue for modules: bug tracking

    I was reading a module on meta::cpan when I spied a small issue. I went up to the Issues link, clicked, and was sent to rt.cpan. I know that many module authors now have their modules on sites like GitHub, GitLab, or Bitbucket. Before I posted the issue on rt.cpan, I checked the author's profile for a linked account to one of the other sites. I found the module on GitHub and read the CONTRIBUTING.md to find the author does want issues reported there and not rt.cpan. I did not report my original issue, I reported the link issue instead as it seemed more important. Today is not the first time I noticed this issue with a module's bug tracking. Before continuing, I have not released a module to CPAN and am still learning all that goes into releasing one. Please be gentle if I am wrong or stating an obvious well known fact.

  • Gisle Aas's CPAN distributions are available for adoption

    Gisle Aas (GAAS on CPAN) is a well-known CPAN author, who made his first releases back in 1995. Over the years he has developed and maintained a number of keystone modules that most of us have relied on, whether we realised it or not. Gisle has informed the PAUSE admins that he will no longer be maintaining his CPAN distributions, and is open to responsible adoption. In this blog post we'll summarise what distributions are available, and our interpretation of responsible adoption. If you're interested, please read this post, and if you still would like to adopt a distribution, contact the PAUSE admins (modules at perl dot org) and not Gisle.

  • Firefox Nightly Flips On New JIT "Warp" Code For Greater JavaScript Performance

    Mozilla's SpiderMonkey JavaScript engine team have been working on a big update to their just-in-time compiler code. This big update called "Warp" is now enabled in the latest Firefox Nightly builds for offering big speed-ups. Warp aims to improve the Firefox JavaScript performance by reducing the amount of internal type information that is tracked along with other optimizations. Warp can lead to greater responsiveness and faster page load speed. Numbers cited by Warm developers are normally in the 5~15% range.

Hardware: Linux on Snapdragon and Raspberry Pi 4