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Python Programming Leftovers

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  • How To Build A Simple Virtual Assistant Using Python

    Virtual assistants are everywhere from Alexa, to Google Home, to Apple Siri. They help us check the weather, make phone calls, control the thermostat, door locks, and other smart home devices e.t.c

    In this article, I will be walking you through how to create a simple virtual assistant using Google Speech Recognition and IBM Watson Text to Speech in Python.

  • Deep Learning in Keras - Building a Deep Learning Model

    Deep learning is one of the most interesting and promising areas of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning currently. With great advances in technology and algorithms in recent years, deep learning has opened the door to a new era of AI applications.

    In many of these applications, deep learning algorithms performed equal to human experts and sometimes surpassed them.

    Python has become the go-to language for Machine Learning and many of the most popular and powerful deep learning libraries and frameworks like TensorFlow, Keras, and PyTorch are built in Python.

    In this series, we'll be using Keras to perform Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA), Data Preprocessing and finally, build a Deep Learning Model and evaluate it.

    In this stage, we will build a deep neural-network model that we will train and then use to predict house prices.

  • Return modified string with Python

    Hello and welcome back, today I have solved another python related problem on CodeWars and would like to post the solution here.

    The question is as follows:-

    Given 2 strings, a and b, return a string of the form short+long+short, with the shorter string on the outside and the long string on the inside. The strings will not be the same length, but they may be empty ( length 0 ).

  • Python 3.9.0rc1

    This is the first release candidate of Python 3.9

    This release, 3.9.0rc1, is the penultimate release preview. Entering the release candidate phase, only reviewed code changes which are clear bug fixes are allowed between this release candidate and the final release. The second candidate and the last planned release preview is currently planned for 2020-09-14.

  • Python 3.9.0rc1 is now available

    Python 3.9.0 is almost ready. This release, 3.9.0rc1, is the penultimate release preview. You can get it here:

    https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-390rc1/

    Entering the release candidate phase, only reviewed code changes which are clear bug fixes are allowed between this release candidate and the final release. The second candidate and the last planned release preview is currently planned for 2020-09-14.

    Please keep in mind that this is a preview release and its use is not recommended for production environments.

  • The Inner Workings of: Arq

    The main point of (what I colloquially call) a job library is, essentially, to execute a function (i.e. job) somewhere else, and potentially at a different time. When using a sync approach to web services (such as when using non-async Django or Flask), the limitations of the synchronous IO model basically require the use of a job library to execute logic outside of the context of a single request handler - if you don't want to do the logic in the scope of a request (and make the request take longer), you need to do it somewhere else, so you need a job library like Celery. A simple example might be an HTTP interface to send an email to a lot of recipients. You might not want the request to wait until all the emails have been sent to return a response since that might take a long time, so you would just schedule a job to run somewhere else to do the work.

    Job libraries like Celery basically require you to run special worker processes in addition to your web handler processes, and the worker processes use a database to get instructions to run functions, and then they run them.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In | GSoc | #11
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #433 (Aug. 11, 2020)
  • Pysa: An Open-Source Tool To Detect & Fix Security Issues In Python Code

    Facebook has open-sourced Pysa, an internal tool used on Instagram to detect and fix bugs in the huge Python codebase of the app. Pysa can automatically identify vulnerable code snippets written by Facebook engineers before they are integrated into the social network’s systems.

    It is a static analyzer tool meaning it works by scanning code in a “static” form before the code is compiled. It hunts for common patterns that are usually observed in bugs and flags the potential issues in the code.

  • Facebook Open Sources Analysis Tool for Python Code

    The security-focused tool relies on Pyre, Facebook’s type checker for Python, and allows for the analysis of how data flows through code. It can be used to identify issues related to the protection of user data, as well as flaws such as XSS and SQL injection.

    In addition to making Pysa available in open source, Facebook released many of the definitions that it leverages when looking for security bugs, making it readily available for others to start analyzing their own Python code.

More in Tux Machines

Purism Launches $99/m Librem AweSIM Cellular Service

The Librem AweSIM is the latest string in the social-purpose company’s bow. It costs $99 a month. For this price buyers get a new sim, a new phone number, and unlimited talk, texts, and data (including over 5G where available) that works with the Librem 5 phone. And since the cellular account is registered under Purism’s name rather than yours it could provide you with an additional later of privacy protection from nefarious carrier tactics. Purism say the plan can be cancelled at any time too, meaning you won’t be locked into a 12 or 24-month contract. Read more Direct: Purism Launches Librem AweSIM Cellular Service Announcing Librem AweSIM: A Privacy-focused Cellular Service for the Librem 5

How I Switched from Windows 10 to Linux Mint

Ok, now I have decided to switch to Linux but here comes the first question. Which distro will satisfy my needs both in terms of GUI and other aspects? Linux is not something new to me since I have been working with RHEL based distros in my work for the past 4 years with the command-line. I know RHEL based distros are good for enterprises but not for personalized desktop environments, at least that’s what I am thinking till now. So I started my research to find the distro that should be easy for me to use and at the same time should have good community support if in case I ran into some problem. Among many Linux distros, I drilled down my list to 4 flavors. Read more

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Review: Acer Swift 3 with Ryzen 7 4700U is a $650 laptop that punches above its class

    While I did not take the time to install a GNU/Linux distro to local storage and test battery life and long-term performance, I did take an Ubuntu 20.04 LTS LiveUSB for a spin and found that almost everything seemed to be working out of the box.

  • The Preservation and Continuation of the Iconic Linux Journal

    As we welcome the return of Linux Journal, it’s worth recognizing the impact of the September 22nd announcement of the magazine’s return and how it sparked many feelings of nostalgia and excitement in thousands among the Linux community. That being said, it is also worth noting that the ways in which journalism has changed since Linux Journal’s first publication in 1994. The number of printed magazines have significantly decreased and exclusively digitally published content has become the norm in most cases. Linux Journal experienced this change in 2011 when the print version of the magazine was discontinued. Although many resented the change, it is far from the only magazine that embraced this trend. Despite the bitterness by some, embracing the digital version of Linux Journal allowed for its writers and publishers to direct their focus on taking full advantage of what the internet had to offer. Despite several advantages of an online publishing format, one concern that was becoming increasingly concerning for Linux Journal until September 22nd, 2020 was the survival of the Linux Journal website. If the website were to have shut down, the community would have potentially lost access to hundreds (or thousands) of articles and documents that were only published on the Linux Journal website and were not collectively available anywhere else. Even if an individual possessed the archive of the monthly issues of the journal, an attempt to republish it would be potentially legally problematic and would certainly show a lack of consideration for the rights of the authors who originally wrote the articles.

  • What is cooking on KDE websites this month (September)?

    The wiki instance we use, there migrated to MediaWiki 3.34 the latest LTS version, this bring a few improvement in the translations module and fix the problem that translated pages couldn’t be moved arround. The commenting plugin was sadly discountinued in this version and instead the Echo extension was added and provide a way to ping people.

  • SoK 2021: Mentor Wanted!

    The Season of KDE is a 3 weeks long program that provides an opportunity for people to do mentored projects for KDE. We are still looking for more mentors for SoK 2021. So please consider mentoring for this year season and adding ideas related to the project you are working on in the Wiki page. And joining the #kde-soc channel.